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Thread: Best factory .243 ammo for heavy game?

  1. #1
    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Default Best factory .243 ammo for heavy game?

    Just a quick question here - That hunting trip I talked about in the other thread - I'm now planning to get my son a Rossi Trifecta for the trip. He'll be carrying the .243 bbl unless I take him out after grouse and ptarmies. I'd love for him to get an opportunity to shoot at something bigger though. I know .243 is extremely light for moose, although I have heard of them being taken with the .243. I won't have time to develop any handloads, so I'm wondering what the best factory loads would be for heavy game. He won't be shooting at all unless the animal is inside of 100 yards, and I'll be backing him up with a .300 WM. Thanks in advance for the knowledge.

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  2. #2

    Default Get a 270 Win barrel

    A 243 is doable for short range neck shot otherwise I wouldn't use it. I would argue that a 270 win with 150 grain bullets would work better and still wouldn't kick that much. It is a good place to start.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    kaboku68 - I agree that a 270 would be better for taking a moose, but not better for my son. He's 9 years old and fairly small. Any 270 small enough to fit him would be too much recoil. I'm set on the 243 for him for now. This will be his first experience with a centerfire and I don't want to induce a recoil flinch that will hurt his accuracy. I'm convinced there's a 243 round out there that will go through the boiler room on a moose at close range. Looking through my Lee reloading manual, I see it's possible to push a 100 grain bullet over 3000 FPS, so I would think it's just a matter of finding a bullet that doesn't expand too quickly so better penetration is possible.

    The whole idea of him actually shooting at a moose is dependent on how he handles the .243 at the range before we head out. I just want to be prepared with the best possible ammo in case I feel he can handle it. If not, he'll have it to grow into.

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    Moose, Brownbear, Muskox and Caribou , Rem corelocks, 100 gr. been there, shot that, many, many times.

    Teach the boy to shoot with confidence and skill, and then enjoy the hunt.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  5. #5
    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Thanks stranger, those Rem corelocks are pretty common, too. I shouldn't have any trouble finding them.

    He's pretty confident and very accurate with his .22, I'm looking forward to taking him to the range to let him try out the 243.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

  6. #6

    Default the true "flinchless" rifle

    We hunt whitetail. At the time I groomed my step boy he was about 12 and very light framed.
    I also chose the .243 in Rem Model 7.
    Make sure his introduction to the rifle at the range includes a good set of head muffs, that little load cracks. If he doesn't hear it, he won't flinch.
    Rem core locks 100gr. Very accurate and so far nothing but deadly on anything he points it at.
    Big heavy hogs, and whitetail.
    I am always amazed at the destruction from that small chunk of lead. Top it off with the fact that he can place a shot withing about 2" at 100 yards makes for a good combo.

  7. #7
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Default

    I bought my boys the same setup. I have read this here:http://www.go2gbo.com/forums/index.p...,161241.0.html

    Please read the post about them. I haven't taken them to the range yet to see if this is the same as the above post. If it is the 80-95 grain bullet should work well. Good Luck

    Ron

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    Thanks canyoncastle, sounds like your son is really enjoying that rifle!

    Ron, I appreciate the tip. If I remember right, the .243 bbl for the trifecta is 22". I'll keep that in mind and buy a box of lighter rounds too, in case I have trouble with the 100 grs. Hopefully that was a problem that has been addressed already by Rossi.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

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  9. #9
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Great round for a kid. I shoot a 6mm, which has just slightly higher velocity than .243, and I dislike the Rem Corelocks. They don't get along with the velocity- very bad fragmentation, losing a large percentage of weight on the way through a Sitka blacktail. I also got the occasional "flyer," both on the range and in the field, where the bullet flew way off course. The deer were very dead, with very little meat loss, but I questioned what the bullet would do in a larger, heavier boned animal. I've since gone to the Federal Premium Nosler Partition. That has been a great round. Shot a sheep facing me in the neck; it blew out the vertebra, traveled the length of the body, through part of the backstrap and the kidneys, and exited through the rear ham, beside the tail. Shot distance was about 200 yards.

    My wife has killed two blackies with it, both at about 20 yards, and both very quick kills. One a double lunger/near shoulder, the other a heart shot.

    The Feds are more spendy per box than the Corelocks, but they are widely available, and even if they are double the cost, whats an extra $2 per shot to be sure you're killing what you're aiming at?

    Caribou are very thin skinned and small boned compared to moose; .243 has killed countless caribou. Range isn't a problem- keep it under 300 yards, shoot behind the shoulder. Moose are thicker skinned, bigger boned, but a shot in the lungs will still get through the animal. I'd pass on a neck shot on a big bull moose, as your son will be pretty amped about shooting a big game animal. Don't treat the bullet like its too small to do the job; its a lot bigger than a lot of people give it credit. Just aim for the sweet spot in the crease of the shoulder and let 'er rip.

  10. #10
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    Willphish - Thanks for the input. I don't mind spending a few extra dollars for premium ammo when using factory stuff for hunting. In my own rifles I handload everything, but I'm only going to be home for a couple of weeks on this trip, so I won't have time to develop handloads for my son's 243. I'll probably buy a couple boxes of cheaper ammo - one of ~ 85 gr. and one of 100 gr. for him to practice with and get it sighted in, and then I'll buy a box of premium ammo in whichever bullet weight works the best at the range. Now if only I could fast-forward to August.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

  11. #11

    Default

    I will really take willpishfor4 food side on this one. I have taken many, many whitetails with my 243. I love shooting this gun but the rem corelokts really do come apart. I switched to nosler partitions and that made a huge difference. I honestly would not even think about corelokts for anything larger than deer. Ken........

  12. #12

    Default stevens 200

    I would really look long and hard at the Tupperware Stevens 200. They now go for almost 300 bucks but if you put a little tlc into them they are a great setup and they don't kick too bad.
    I purchased one expressively for my son when he was 10 and he is a small guy as well. You might have to replace the trigger and repaint the stock with some krylon but it is a great little project gun and it doesn't kick as much as my wife's 600 in 243.
    The reason I am pushing the 270 is that it will take down a big moose. A 243 will as well but there is almost no margin for error with the 243. The 270 can bust the shoulder and its not going to get out in the water.
    I shot my first moose with a 270 win when I was 11. It was a 36 in small bull but it went down with the first shot at 240 yards.
    You will be backing up the young guy with a 243 and I have used a 22/250 to take moose, caribou and a small grizzly when I was teaching up north on the Kobuk. However, the distance and set up was perfect up there and the 788 would put bullet into bullet hole.
    In my experience a big 50 inch + moose can take some killing and it would be terrible for the guy not to nail it with the first shot. The Rossi's are accurate but you only have one shot.
    Just check out the little stevens 200 and think what it would look like with a compact 4X. Strangely my son decided he wanted a silver metallic grain. I put camo electrical tape over it when we go hunting. They make that stevens in a 243 as well.
    I will try to post it.
    The little vanguard compact 7mm-08 would be another really sweet starter gun. Thank you for serving our country.
    You won't go wrong with whatever you take as long as you take him along.
    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  13. #13
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    Default Simms recoil pad

    Spend $30 and get him a Simms recoil pad to go with it. My kid liked it so much I bought one for myself.

  14. #14
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Default Just another thought

    I bought my grandson (age 12 ) a Ruger 270 cal with a shortened stock. We use Remington's "managed recoil " loads. 110 grain and he shoots it fine on paper. Can't wait for hunting season.
    Remington also makes these low recoil loads on 30-30 and 30-06

  15. #15
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    Yeah, I plan to move my son up to an 06 when he's around 12. I will hand-load my own "managed recoil" loads for him to practice with then. He's just too small now for me to take a chance with something that could be detrimental to accuracy. I am fairly confident he can handle the .243 for now. I'll back him up on the larger game and when we get a chance to head down to the islands for black tail deer he will not be undergunned. (I'll have my .450 marlin along for brown bear medicine.)

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    Default +1 more for the Nosler Partitions

    For factory loadings AND future handloads... You get the best of both worlds with this bullet no matter the cailber... opens fast (but not explosively) and the rest stays together to drive deeep and damage tissue.

    Good luck and enjoy the time with the kid...

  17. #17
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    Thanks, I'm sure this will be a great trip. I agree on the nosler partitions, by the way. I use them for my handloads in my .300 WM. My wife is picking up my son's rifle tomorrow. We're getting him a Rossi combo with .22 and .243 barrels. Since he already has a .410 I decided not to get the Trifecta, which includes the 20 ga barrel also. The nice thing about the Rossi though is that I can always get another barrel when he's ready. They also make 20 ga, 12 ga, 44 mag and 308 barrels for the same gun.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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