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Thread: Buffalo Bore Ammo Fails

  1. #1
    Member Armymark's Avatar
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    Default Buffalo Bore Ammo Fails

    I bought a new S&W 329PD Alaskan Backpacker a week or so ago. I also bought 3 different types of ammo. 240 grain Federal Premium Hydra-Shok, HSM 240 Grain semi-wad cutter and a couple boxes of Buffalo Bore Low Recoil .44 which is 255 grains. I put the tgt frame out at 10 yards with an NRA 100 yard small bore rifle target. About the size of a paper plate. I fired the HSM wad cutters. To my surprise, all 6 hit the black. I haven't shot a large bore pistol for a very long time. Fired another 6 and was not quite as good, but the recoil was not what I expected with the light frame, actually quite manageable! So I loaded the Federals up and had similar results. Now, I loaded the BB low recoil .44s and only 4 of six fired. What the... Cleared the pistol and reloaded with 6 fresh BB. Only 3 fired this time. I went through the whole box of 20 and only half the box fired! Thats right, 10 of 20, 50%! Reloaded the cylinder with the wad cutters, bang, bang bang, all 6! I bought four boxes of that crap! Anyone else have issues like this with Baffalo Bore? I for one will never trust BB.

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Did the primers dimple at all? Are they obviously not fully seated in the pocket or anything?

  3. #3
    Member Armymark's Avatar
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    Hunt, The primers dimpled and they don't look like they were improperly seated.

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    Sounds like the primers got contaminated with something, either at the factory, or after. Gun oil, and WD40 or similar, is famous for "doing in" primers. Many factory-made ammo is now laquer-sealed around the primer to prevent this problem.

    You might want to contact B-B and see if they will reimburse you. I'd be curious what their response is.


    Marshall/Ak

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Lots of folks have the same problem with that ammo

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    Member WaterWolf's Avatar
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    Yipper getting the same reports across most of the boards.

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    I bought a box in 454 Casull and they miss fired. I called BB and he said Rugers have a firing pin problem. Grizzly, HSM and others fired every time. After close examination of the BB ammo I found the primers to be the problem. Some were not seated and some of those were tilted in the pockets. After 10-20 trigger pulls they would seat and fire. BB sucks!

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    I have never had one.........no, not even one round of my hand made ammo fail to fire, in that gun or any other gun when loaded with the same bullets as BB uses. Maybe I've just been lucky.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by marshall View Post
    I bought a box in 454 Casull and they miss fired. I called BB and he said Rugers have a firing pin problem. Grizzly, HSM and others fired every time. After close examination of the BB ammo I found the primers to be the problem. Some were not seated and some of those were tilted in the pockets. After 10-20 trigger pulls they would seat and fire. BB sucks!

    BB says Rugers have a firing pin problem? That's a new one on me! My SRH 454 has NEVER misfired in the several years I've had it. (but then, I've never tried BB ammo) I'm thinking BB needs to go back to school to learn how to seat primers, and stop making excuses.
    No BB for me!

    Marshall/Ak

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshall/Ak View Post
    BB says Rugers have a firing pin problem? That's a new one on me! My SRH 454 has NEVER misfired in the several years I've had it. (but then, I've never tried BB ammo) I'm thinking BB needs to go back to school to learn how to seat primers, and stop making excuses.
    No BB for me!

    Marshall/Ak
    I'm taking it as a bad sign that the company is blaming everyone else. Has a familiar ring to it, doesn't it?

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    They need to take the remaining ammo back and examine it. If they have a quality control problem, taking customer complaints seriously is the only way to successfully deal with it.

    Mike

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    BB always blames someone else.

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    Member Armymark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I'm taking it as a bad sign that the company is blaming everyone else. Has a familiar ring to it, doesn't it?
    I read on the BB web page the .44 mag low recoil was made because they had problems with the +P+ stuff they make was jumping crimp in the 329PD's. I'sn't jumping crimp a reloading failure or an improperly crimped cartridge to begin with?

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    Default 329 PDs...

    ArmyMark,

    Here's a little of what I know... and the thing most people forget... The Smith & Wesson Model 329 PD owner's manual says this:

    1. Don't use ammo that exceeds SAAMI specs for .44 Magnum ammo.

    The manual also tells you to load 6 rounds into your gun and shoot 5 of them. Remove the last round, unfired, and examine it to see if the projectile has moved forwards. If it has, don't use that ammo in the firearm. The light weight of the revolver causes a very fast recoil impulse that causes the projectiles to pull free. It's a known issue in light weight revolvers.

    Buffalo Bore has its fans and detractors. So does Cor-Bon. I've seen a LOT more problems with Cor-Bon ammo than I EVER have seen with Buffalo Bore ammo.

    The BEST .44 Magnum ammo to use in a 329 PD is Federal Cast Core 300 grain lead ammo. Unfortunately, I've not been able to locate this for about a year or two. If you know where it is, please post on the forum.

    I've also seen in older S&W manuals that they said not to exceed 240 or 300 grain projectile weight. I must tell that I can't seem to find my manual to confirm this and my memory is a bit fuzzy.

    One more thing, some S&W 329 PD revolvers do have "short" firing pins. It's a known problem and S&W will fix the problem.

    Kirk out.

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    They just cut too many corners.

    Having those trained bears seat the primers was a BAD idea.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
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  16. #16

    Default New S&W 329PD with 6 rounds of Buffalo Bore

    Three weeks ago I purchased a new S&W 329PD after following many of the related threads on this site as well as reading the 329PD review on GunBlast.com (http://www.gunblast.com/SW329PD.htm). After purchasing the wheel gun, I ordered three boxes of Buffalo Bore's reduced recoil .44 mag that I received about a week later. I shot a couple of boxes of .44 special after purchasing the pistol, but this past weekend I took a box of the BB with me to the range as I wanted to feel the level of recoil as well as validate that my 329 was sighted well (with the BB). My first shot was a dead bullseye (7 yards) while my remaining 5 all found the target progressively lower. After firing all six rounds I realized that I was pulling the pistol downward after the first shot in anticipation of the recoil which is significant. Anyway, I only fired six rounds of the BB; however, they all fired . But after reading these posts I will be firing the remaining rounds in that box over the next week or so as I would like to have confidence that there will be a bang when the hammer falls. I'll post the results of my next shoot ASAP.

    WhiteFish

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    Member Armymark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capt. James T. Kirk View Post
    ArmyMark,

    Here's a little of what I know... and the thing most people forget... The Smith & Wesson Model 329 PD owner's manual says this:

    1. Don't use ammo that exceeds SAAMI specs for .44 Magnum ammo.

    The manual also tells you to load 6 rounds into your gun and shoot 5 of them. Remove the last round, unfired, and examine it to see if the projectile has moved forwards. If it has, don't use that ammo in the firearm. The light weight of the revolver causes a very fast recoil impulse that causes the projectiles to pull free. It's a known issue in light weight revolvers.

    Buffalo Bore has its fans and detractors. So does Cor-Bon. I've seen a LOT more problems with Cor-Bon ammo than I EVER have seen with Buffalo Bore ammo.

    The BEST .44 Magnum ammo to use in a 329 PD is Federal Cast Core 300 grain lead ammo. Unfortunately, I've not been able to locate this for about a year or two. If you know where it is, please post on the forum.

    I've also seen in older S&W manuals that they said not to exceed 240 or 300 grain projectile weight. I must tell that I can't seem to find my manual to confirm this and my memory is a bit fuzzy.

    One more thing, some S&W 329 PD revolvers do have "short" firing pins. It's a known problem and S&W will fix the problem.

    Kirk out.
    I understand how to check the crimp. What I'm talking about is that Buffalo Bore advertises that the Low Recoil .44 Mag was designed specifically for the 329 PD and other revolvers like it. Here is a quote from the company itself with the web link so you can read it yourself,



    When S&W introduced their model 329PD, we noticed that some of those scandium revolvers would experience sticky extraction with our Heavy loads and the recoil in the light weight scandium 329PD guns was horrendous, to say the least. This recoil would some times cause bullets to "jump crimp" thus tying up the revolver. In order to alleviate the recoil, crimp jump and sticky extraction, we have developed this load. It is still full power, but uses a lighter weight, super hard cast, gas checked bullet and will still penetrate very deeply in big game despite its lighter weight. This load is ideal for those of you who carry the S&W model 329PD. This load will not lead your barrel. Do not phone/email us and ask if this load is safe in your particular 44 mag. - it is - providing your gun is in normal working condition. Now there exists a serious full power 44 mag. load that will penetrate big bones (including a bears skull) and drive deeply into living organs and tissues, that has minimum recoil.
    http://www.buffalobore.com/index.php...ct_detail&p=55

    I have extracted this from BB's own web page, but you'll note that it specifically says that the product was designed for the 329PD. I didn't say I had a problem with crimp jump, my issue is the out right failure of 50% of the 20 rounds failing to fire when all other ammunition I tested in the gun, fired everytime. You'll note as well that the ammunition is advertised to be within the SAAMI standards when you read the advertisement. The recoil of the 255 grain cartridges was not anywhere near what might cause the bullets to come unseated and jump the crimp unless the crimp is of the same QC stadards as the rest. The recoil wasn't much more than the wad cutters! You'll also note that it suggests it will penetrate a bears skull (if you can get one to fire before he's sitting on your chest). I take my self defense a little more serious than 50%. Thats the same as a wet flintlock capt.

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    Member Armymark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    They just cut too many corners.

    Having those trained bears seat the primers was a BAD idea.

    Smitty of the North

    Amen brother!

  19. #19
    Member chriso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capt. James T. Kirk View Post
    Buffalo Bore has its fans and detractors. So does Cor-Bon. I've seen a LOT more problems with Cor-Bon ammo than I EVER have seen with Buffalo Bore ammo.
    Kirk out.
    Can you enlighten me about the Cor-Bon issues please? I purchsed some of it as well as some of the BB stuff for my 10mm and now I'm wondering if I should treat it as practice ammo if theres a question as to weather or not it fires when the time comes that its needed?

    Thanks, Chris

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    Default Cor-Bon

    Chriso,

    I've seen Cor-Bon ammo lock up cylinders and give sticky extraction from revolvers. Especially .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum S&W revolvers.

    I don't think I've ever seen an issue in an auto pistol.

    If it doesn't give problems in your particular firearm, I wouldn't sweat it.

    Kirk out.

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