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Thread: .243 for Goat?

  1. #1
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default .243 for Goat?

    We all know those hairy cliff-dwellers can be very tough.

    Has anybody killed a goat with a .243? What bullet/load would you recommend?

    Wife will be hunting for a billy this fall and she is deadly with her Winchester Ranger youth .243.

    Drop a line if you have some experience...

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    Default 243

    I wouldn't do it myself as I have found them to be very tough to kill.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I'm sure someone will say its good enough for brown bear if the hunter shoots stright. JMHO but the goat seams about twice as hardy as the biggest whitetail and a shot that will kill him before he can run a hundred yards may place him where he is lost to about everything but bugs. If I had to use it I would chose the biggest strongest bullet made for it

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Suicidal Mt Goats...

    fullkurl,

    I would not be concerning about a well placed .243 bullet killing a billly goat. But I would be very concerned about the goat recovery. Mountain goats, in my experience and observation, are "spring-loaded" to launch off into a suicidal dive into the worst available junk when they get shot. So pick your shots, her shots, carefully.

    But...I (my client hunters) have also shot two mountain goats in rather gentle feeding areas where they died without a life threatening recovery effort. I would sugggest hunting "late season", rather than "early season". The "early season" goats, especially while resting, have always been high in elevation and in terrible rocky and "cliffee" areas. So when they die they tumble in the rocky chutes forever. My "late season" goats lave been just above the alder brush line. So when they die they hang up in the alder brush.

    I generally like big bullets to knock the heck out of Mr. Goat and immobilize him ASAP. In your case- and I know that you know this- carefully pick your shot (her shot), at a "recoverable" goat. Double lung or shoulder shot with a .243? I don't know. How about suggesting a double lung shot that will also break the far shoulder. And get as close as possible. It is easy to talk-write about this stuff, harder to get a billy goat to pose in the perfect position.

    Side note...while I truely love guiding client-hunters and friends in pursuit of all species, I also truely dislike "guiding" my family members in dangerous situations...Subject matter for a new thread someday...

    Dennis
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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Wink I don't get it.....

    well it is now nearly a year since i joined here....


    and i have listened to all you guys ...sheep hunting is hard...
    Goats are worse...

    what is up with that? why do you guys all want to perpetrate a complete and total myth?

    in all my life i have harvested Dozens of sheep and probably 15 goats at least...

    the table fare is second to none i will agree with that...


    But come on? how hard can it be? DEATH defying???

    Not hardly...






    dang just go out to the barn... grab one and smack it on the head...simple and done in short order...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  6. #6
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    well it is now nearly a year since i joined here....


    and i have listened to all you guys ...sheep hunting is hard...
    Goats are worse...

    what is up with that? why do you guys all want to perpetrate a complete and total myth?

    in all my life i have harvested Dozens of sheep and probably 15 goats at least...

    the table fare is second to none i will agree with that...


    But come on? how hard can it be? DEATH defying???

    Not hardly...






    dang just go out to the barn... grab one and smack it on the head...simple and done in short order...
    Yuk, yuk!

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default

    i'd go with the nolser partition in it, gonna take my kids 243 to kodiak this fall and give it a run just to see how it works out.
    i'd try it.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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  8. #8
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    i'd go with the nolser partition in it, gonna take my kids 243 to kodiak this fall and give it a run just to see how it works out.
    i'd try it.
    Is that part of his trifecta?? Cant remember if thats what he had or not...

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    My wife will be shooting her 7mm-08 for her goat hunt. Also considered by many to be too light for goats, but I would rather she shoot something she is comfortable with than risk a poor shot with a higher-powered rifle. I figure she'll push 140 grain noslers if they fly as well out of her rifle as the core-lokt bullets have thus far. I'll also be backing her up with a larger gun, and if there is any move towards a cliff, I'll do what I can to help out.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    I'm sure someone will say its good enough for brown bear if the hunter shoots straight. JMHO but the goat seams about twice as hardy as the biggest whitetail and a shot that will kill him before he can run a hundred yards may place him where he is lost to about everything but bugs. If I had to use it I would chose the biggest strongest bullet made for it
    It's Good enough for Brown Bear, if the hunter shoots straight. I have only harvested twenty'some Mt. Goats, but my experience is, they react the same for a well placed .243 Win. as they do from a well placed .338 Win. Magnum. I have had .243 Win. shoot end to end through five plus feet of Caribou using the 95 Grain Nosler Bullet. Hornady has factory "Heavy Magnum" loads for the .243 Winchester. Yes, a Mt. Goat is the slowest to die with its heart shot out, and yes it can stand there for 15 seconds dead on it's feet before it drops, but dead is dead.

    Some animals like Mt. Goats just take a long time to drop. Rather than more powerful firearm, hunters would be wise to learn the strange route of the Mt. Goat spine. A spine shot takes more skill, but it is the only shot that will drop a Mt. Goat in his tracks, right now. Mt. Goats are the toughest of all Alaska animals to kill quickly, but more powerful firearm is not the answer for such a "THIN" animal, perfect shot placement is your friend.

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    Default 243

    Quote Originally Posted by driveacub View Post
    I wouldn't do it myself as I have found them to be very tough to kill.

    On second thought, a cousin of mine came to AK many years ago and I took him goat hunting. He shot a small billy with his 243 with no problem. He handloads and was shooting Nosler bullets and was probably pretty hot on the load. He is an excellent shot and it was well placed and definitely did the job.

  12. #12
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    huntak, ya the 243 is part of his little rossi trifecta, .22, .243 20 ga.
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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Aren't you guys non res, Frank? What does her guide recommend?
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  14. #14
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martentrapper View Post
    Aren't you guys non res, Frank? What does her guide recommend?
    This hunt is taking place in Idaho, marten.

  15. #15
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Thanks, guys.

    Dennis, we're going to try and be patient, get this goat done on as safe/sane ground as we can. There is a ton of craggy country here. It's a tough gig with goats, but shooting right at or near timberline should save some carnage.
    Jake, I know that you've posted (videos etc.) on the toughness of these creatures...was glad that you jumped in, we'll go Nosler partition 140 gr or larger if available.
    We'll give it some practice time. If she isn't comfortable and accurate with that load, she'll shoot my 300.
    Either way, shot placement will be key,

    Trap, if we go goat hunting in AK, we'll call our son in Fairbanks and go git 'er done... (unless the second degree kindred regs have changed?)

    Looking forward to reading your wife's hunting story, Brian.



    Here's a thick early-season Idaho goat in wife's area...
    Last edited by fullkurl; 10-17-2009 at 20:31.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default hang on sparky

    Better back off on that bullet weight. The 140grain is coming out of a 7mm-08. Shoot either an 85 or 100 grain. You will have a tough time even finding a bullet more than 110 for a .243. They're nice flat shooting guns; have a great time!

  17. #17
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    Better back off on that bullet weight. The 140grain is coming out of a 7mm-08. Shoot either an 85 or 100 grain. You will have a tough time even finding a bullet more than 110 for a .243. They're nice flat shooting guns; have a great time!

    Okee doke, Wp4f....
    Just getting aware of what's out there for the 'lil .243.

    We'll get educated with possible loads and we'll shoot them to find the sweet stuff.

    Thanks for the input...

  18. #18
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    This thread has been explored before on the forum. I would file my opinion behind BRWNBR and recommend the standard NP. My reasoning is that the explosive effect of the front 1/2 of the NP anecdotally has proven to be devastating with on the average. a more rapidly lethal end result on Mt. Goat. Since the goat is more or less "slab sided", high velocity premium bullets have more of a tendency to have "passed thru" before significant tissue damage has resulted. A premium bullet hitting a bone would in essence function similar to a NP. The other recommendations such as pinpoint accuracy, spinal shot, and late season hunting are about as sage as it gets. Good luck.

  19. #19
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Frank i have some 100 gn nosler partions if you want i will send you some to have loaded up.... so you know what you are shooting....


    and to answer the PMs.....


    yup thats a lot of sheep

    nope not from montana..

    dont wear button flys...

    AK farm raised. through and through....
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  20. #20
    Member icb12's Avatar
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    I've seen one goat killed with a .243. It stood there.. and stood there.. and stood there.. and for a change of pace.. it stood there.




    Then it fell over.

    I've also seen one take 3 kill shots from a .300 mag and still not manage to die the way it was suppose to.

    Echoing the other sentiments. Good bullet, good shot placement, good conditions (i.e. billy not standing at the top of a huge shale chute that reaches all the way to the saltwater), and be ready for a follow up through the shoulders to put him in the dirt.
    Have fun!!

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