Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Over training question?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    324

    Default Over training question?

    When training a hunting dog how often should you give them a day off? I view my retriever as an athlete. Do dogs need a rest or recover day in their training schedule as people do? Just curious. I searched this forum for it but found no info, thanks for any sent my way.
    "A dog has no use for fancy cars or big homes or designer clothes. Status symbol means nothing to him. A waterlogged stick will do just fine." Marley and Me

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    324

    Default additional info

    I train with my dog once a day for anywhere between 5 minutes and up to an hour. The time she spends training daily really just depends on how she reacts to it. If she looks tired or like she needs a break. If she is going strong I'll let her go for an hour. She is still peppy and eager to retrieve for me every trip, I was just wondering if a 1 day break(or more if necessary) will help prevent injury and burn out. Once again, thanks for any info.
    "A dog has no use for fancy cars or big homes or designer clothes. Status symbol means nothing to him. A waterlogged stick will do just fine." Marley and Me

  3. #3

    Default

    I try to maintain a "Balance" in training.
    Vary from yard drills to field marks or water marks(non cheating for young dogs).
    Having variety keeps them from getting bored. Gives them a better attitude also when it comes to going back to yard drills.

    Having a day off is good for "soft" dogs that don't do well with repetition. Those hard driving dogs just get more revved up when they finally get to work. It really depends on your dogs attitude and how you work with her. Maintaining her good attitude is just as important as the training she is receiving.

    Also, stop your training early. Especially when they are doing well. Go out with a plan in mind of what you want to teach. But also have an idea of what to back up to if your dog runs into trouble. Go back to something your dog does well so you can end with the dog being successful.
    I've seen so many folks that will keep doing the same thing until enevitably the dog fails. Well why keep doing it until the dog has trouble. Stop early and celebrate the success instead of having to rebuild the dog when it fails.

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

    Default Balance

    Wetlands is right with that even for people. I trained with Dan DeVos back east. He trained and handled a number of FC CFC and even with these "Hot" dogs he balanced tasks from marks to blinds. Set up easy tasks then difficult but always ending on a good note. If the training is diverse its not work, its play for the dog and more fun for the trainer.
    www.alaskadognews.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •