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Thread: Photographing your piscatorial prizes...

  1. #1
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Photographing your piscatorial prizes...

    Just looked over fish pics accumulated the past year. Enjoyed them all, but pics of fish in-the-water had a special appeal. What do you consider when taking pictures of fish you/others have caught? Here are a few of my "notes to self":

    1. Fishing alone vs fishing with a willing photographer. BTW: calling on an unwilling photographer repeatedly, might mean you'll be finding a new fishing partner next season.
    2. Natural setting: pics in the field, at the site of catch if possible
    3. With the rod/reel, fly/lure if possible
    4. In the water if you can... fisherman in water, fish in water... I have 2 friends who I noticed are masters at holding the rod/reel in one hand, fish (near/in the water) in the other hand while smiling...forming this triangle of interest for the pic.
    5. Fill the screen with your subject
    6. Consider lighting in every shot; good light on fish/faces. Sometimes flash on faces works well with sun on backs (fill-in flash)

  2. #2

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    No blood, hat back, and sunglasses off...

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    Member AKducks's Avatar
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    also when you should take the picture make sure that you are level with the the subject (don't stand to take the photo of someone sitting)

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    Member JustinW's Avatar
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    And for goodness sake don't do the silly thing where you hold the fish as far away from your body as possible in an attempt to make the fish appear larger than it is. Nobody gets fooled by that "trick"

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    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustinW View Post
    And for goodness sake don't do the silly thing where you hold the fish as far away from your body as possible in an attempt to make the fish appear larger than it is. Nobody gets fooled by that "trick"
    In my opinion, it isn't to "trick" anyone into thinking the fish was bigger, it is so you can see the details of the fish better, people do not want to see a pic of the person, they want to see the fish...

    Fish On!
    You know your not catching any fish when you start talking about the weather...


    http://www.alaskansalmonslayers.com/

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    Member JediMasterSalmonSlayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigcox View Post
    In my opinion, it isn't to "trick" anyone into thinking the fish was bigger, it is so you can see the details of the fish better, people do not want to see a pic of the person, they want to see the fish...

    Fish On!
    I like to levitate the fish for the picture
    http://www.myfishingpictures.com/watermark.php?file=133776
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  7. #7
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Kings might be an exception...

    Quote Originally Posted by 6XLeech View Post
    ... pics of fish in-the-water had a special appeal...
    But most anglers are smiling just fine by the time they land old Chinook!

  8. #8
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustinW View Post
    And for goodness sake don't do the silly thing where you hold the fish as far away from your body as possible in an attempt to make the fish appear larger than it is. Nobody gets fooled by that "trick"
    I really don't care about the person I just want to see the fish and most photogs don't really realize this. That's why I hold fish out
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  9. #9
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Winter: time to plan for better fish pictures...

    We all enjoy photos of our outings - not just of the fish, but mostly of the fish and anglers. Until a few years ago, I didn't give much thought to it, but after looking at pictures I thought could have been better (cutting the top half of angler's head off in the picture or not doing a beautiful Rainbow justice due to poor or excessive light for instance), I spent some hours thinking about it and planning to do better. Some good tips by others on this thread already, but here are a few more:

    1. Learn a few techniques: http://www.matthayes.tv/blog/index.p...tch-pictures/: Good general article with sample photos illustrating: how to frame your subject, fill the frame with fish and subject and learning to use "fill-in flash" to eliminate shadows especially around the fish. The sample photos also give examples of how to emphasize the fish, the angler, the fly, etc.

    2. How to pose? Depends on what you want to see in your fish pictures later. A couple of friends of mine use this type pose often - which shows off the fish and flyrod/reel quite well: Zoom in tight to emphasize the fish more or zoom out a bit to include the angler. I did both on this occasion with good results. Attachment 45935Attachment 45936

    3. The components you want are usually: fish, angler, scenery... Here are other good samples worth considering:
    a. My favorite in this link is the last one - a shot for solo fly fishers: http://globalflyfisher.com/gallery/b...tures_of_fish/. Taking pictures when fishing alone is challenging. Sometimes I set up a tripod in advance, but the fish may not cooperate always.
    b. But other topics too: http://globalflyfisher.com/gallery/
    c. Thoughts on photos from Scott fly rods: http://www.scottflyrod.com/blog/view/172
    d. Pro shots: http://www.adambarkerphotography.com...es-underwater/, http://western-fly-fishing.info/wordpress/

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    I have a lot of pictures I wish I had closer and overall better shots of, I used to do the whole person in the shot with the fish, I still do one full photo quick, then get a good close up on it. Well unless I'm not the one taking the picture, then it just is what it is. This picture would have been way better from a staight on angle instead of on top.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_0352.jpg  

  11. #11

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    Rule #1 for me if the fish is to be released is Be Quick About It. I've timed guys getting "just the right shot" and they generally take 3-5 minutes, even though it seems quicker to them. Even if they manage to "revive" the fish for release, I have serious doubts about it living for the next hour. Nutshell, if it's my camera I hand it to someone else before I even land the fish. If it's someone else's fish, I have the camera out before they even land it. My goal is less than 15 seconds end to end for the "trophy shoot."

    Gonna kill the fish anyway? Play pro photographer and take all the time you want.
    This is my favorite grip-n-grin shot. It provided months of tasty meals and now graces our wall as a quality fiberglass mount.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  12. #12

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    I like the person and the fish in the shot. One nice thing about having a 18mp dslr is I can crop photos and blow them up and see all of the detail i want. I usually will take one photo with the fly in the mouth for my journal and then the rest i will take the fly out. I don't really like pics of people holding them to close the the camera. (just my opinion) It's hard to see how big the fish really is. You can make a 20" fish look huge by holding it close the the camera. I also like pics of fish on the measuring board. It's nice when someone says "that fish isn't that big" you can show them the board Ha so there is no fish tales with the measuring board. Its also the easiest and fasted way to get an accurate measurment.

  13. #13
    Member JediMasterSalmonSlayer's Avatar
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    Mise en scene
    http://www.myfishingpictures.com/watermark.php?file=133776
    Jedi Salmon Powers Activated!
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