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Thread: Anyone Know how to wire up 12v and 110v in camper?

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Default Anyone Know how to wire up 12v and 110v in camper?

    Just bought a used truck camper and want to get it wired up with a few batteries. Want to run off battery power and shore power when available. Just enough for a few lights and some small eletronic devices no A/C or microwave.
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    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    Does it have any wiring at all? Lamps? Heater fan?
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    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phish Finder View Post
    Does it have any wiring at all? Lamps? Heater fan?
    Nope none at all. Just propane lamp, heater and stove. Doesn't need outdoor lights or anything like that just all interior lights and a few 110v receptacles. I guess I need a converter/inverter but unsure about it.
    Former A.F Staff Sergeant

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    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    It may be easier for you to buy a couple of LED lamps and an inverter for your truck. Either that or a generator. Starting from scratch with wiring is a PITA. I used a small inverter that plugged into the cigarette lighter and ran off the battery or alternator. The LED lamps are $15 at Costco and use C batteries. That would be the most economical and practical unless you had to have power in your camper.

    If you really want power, one of these may be your solution:
    http://www.amazon.com/Duracell-DPP-6...6561689&sr=1-1

    It's doesn't cost much more than a deep cycle battery and it doesn't require a drill and wires.
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Yeah I might do that. I've been doing a lot of research on it and it seems straight forward just tedious. Got some time to decide since it needs some structural work done first and a new paint job. Interior will be done last. Thanks for the info.
    Former A.F Staff Sergeant

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    here is the cheap easy way..

    Battery opperated lights... stick on's... been it, done it, still do it...

    the time you need the light is getting up and about or settleing it. other times your propain is the best choice or it is still light out.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    So you're saying to not even bother with battery power at all? Isn't that pretty much like tent camping?
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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doug1980 View Post
    So you're saying to not even bother with battery power at all? Isn't that pretty much like tent camping?
    not when you can buy self adhesive lights that take a D battery at wall mart and be done in 15 minutes.

    or LED lights with some double stick tape and be done in 17 minutes... and NOT have to worry about running your truck down.

    how much time will you actually be IN THE CAMPER?

    eat sleep heavy rain... the rest of the time is out by the camp fire or off doing what you went for.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    not when you can buy self adhesive lights that take a D battery at wall mart and be done in 15 minutes.

    or LED lights with some double stick tape and be done in 17 minutes... and NOT have to worry about running your truck down.

    how much time will you actually be IN THE CAMPER?

    eat sleep heavy rain... the rest of the time is out by the camp fire or off doing what you went for.
    Yeah I hear ya, I think my wife has this delusion of what camping is all about. She even wanted me to put in a real toilet and shower....in a 4 foot tall camper... that's impossible. lol Not much for roughing it.
    Former A.F Staff Sergeant

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Hey Doug-

    I saw and responded to your post on your camper on the Woodall/Good Sam site.

    Here's how you could do it:

    - Get a good quality, RV-rated deep cycle battery, terminal busses to accomodate different leads from each terminal, several feet each of 14 ga. red and black wiring, connectors, etc.;
    - get an on-board trickle charger such as a Schauer brand;
    - get a small inverter with several outlets (they're ubiquitous);
    - by an accessory cigarette lighter with mounting tab and inline fuse.

    Find a place to put your battery (mine goes outside the camper in front of the wheel well, but you may have a battery compartment, just make sure it is vented). Mount the trickle charger next to it and hard wire it to the battery. Make sure the AC plug is handy so you can charge your battery between outings.

    Next, hard wire your inverter to your battery somewhere in your camper's interior. Do the same with your cigarette lighter, so that you can plug an appliance of either voltage into the proper receptacle. You can also route some household electrical cord (such as you would use for a lamp) up a corner or through some wire molding directly from the battery to a 12v overhead light which has its own switch. Voila! You now have an electrical system!

    You can make your travels last longer by carrying a small generator and extension cord on a hitch carrier so can charge your battery. You also may be able to trickle charge with a small solar panel.

    Happy camping.

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    I saw and responded to your post on your camper on the Woodall/Good Sam site.

    Here's how you could do it:

    - Get a good quality, RV-rated deep cycle battery, terminal busses to accomodate different leads from each terminal, several feet each of 14 ga. red and black wiring, connectors, etc.;
    - get an on-board trickle charger such as a Schauer brand;
    - get a small inverter with several outlets (they're ubiquitous);
    - by an accessory cigarette lighter with mounting tab and inline fuse.

    Find a place to put your battery (mine goes outside the camper in front of the wheel well, but you may have a battery compartment, just make sure it is vented). Mount the trickle charger next to it and hard wire it to the battery. Make sure the AC plug is handy so you can charge your battery between outings.

    Next, hard wire your inverter to your battery somewhere in your camper's interior. Do the same with your cigarette lighter, so that you can plug an appliance of either voltage into the proper receptacle. You can also route some household electrical cord (such as you would use for a lamp) up a corner or through some wire molding directly from the battery to a 12v overhead light which has its own switch. Voila! You now have an electrical system!

    You can make your travels last longer by carrying a small generator and extension cord on a hitch carrier so can charge your battery. You also may be able to trickle charge with a small solar panel.

    Happy camping.
    Cool thanks for the info. I'm sure I will figure it ot. Got it all tore apart today and replaced a lot of rotten wood. Trying to get the otside all done then I'll move inside and fix that all up. Electrical is a high priority along with the propane system. It's so much fun though.
    Former A.F Staff Sergeant

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    When I added a 12v outlet to my pickup camper for the laptop inverter, I had to solder the connections to keep the voltage up. The inverter would buzz and carry on with just crimp on connections.
    Something to keep in mind as you wire.
    Last edited by travelers; 07-03-2009 at 06:29. Reason: bad spelling
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