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Thread: worth it?

  1. #1
    Member nategr's Avatar
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    Default worth it?

    This is for those that are in/or retired ADFG or with the troopers.


    I have always loved the water and fish, grew up in Florida by the water. I have contemplated about going into the fish and game area of work but never pulled the trigger. Now I am thinking once again about getting a degree in Fish and Game, found one that is offered by Oregon State that is online and I can work on it while I still work.

    Question is, what does the day/week consist of? Is it behind the desk doing paperwork all day, or do you go out and take water samples and count salmon, then write up your observations? What is the good and bad of the job.

    On the enforcement side with the troopers, what are the major drawbacks?

    Both sides intrigue me; have always liked the enforcement side more, I cannot stand to see illegal taking of F/G, or blatant abuse of a resource.

    I just wanted to get some ideas before I put myself through the ringer with more school. Only a few of my credits from my other degrees will transfer over since they are business related and not science/math related.

    Thanks for any info


    Nate

  2. #2
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default

    Wildlife enforcement is an arm of the state troopers. You will be trained as a state trooper. They are now a separate branch, but you still may end up dividing time between wildlife enforcement and deadbeat dad research, traffic stops, and dv calls in the winter. A current trooper would be able to better answer that question. The way the fish and game office works, for biologists, there will be desk time, field time, and in winter, meeting time dealing with the political end of things a bit- either speaking to your own research or representing the department.

    You may try calling adf&g in Palmer at 907-746-6300 and asking for Dave Rutz or Sam Ivy- they could fill you in on their duties there, and whether its a good choice or not.

  3. #3
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    Smile Conservation agencies

    Though you specified the ADF&G, there are other ways to work in fish conservation aside from the law aspect. If you are also interested in fish conservation you might look to a number of federal agencies that have fish conservation arms within them. The Bureau of Land Management, the US Fish and Wildlife, the National Park Service, and the US Forest Service all have some sort of fisheries arm. Many deal with Subisistance and work with local area agencies (Government to Government, dealing with local Native Non-Profit tribes) to assist with fish management.

    Just thought I'd throw that out there.

    Alaska needs good people who not only enjoy the bounty of fish, but are always in need of those who want to help with the preservation of the future health and population of fish resources.

    Yes, I work for one of them and I help coordinate volunteers who come to Alaska and are Alaskans, each year just of give of their time because they care as well.
    The best of luck in your endeavours.

  4. #4
    Member nategr's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tazman View Post
    Though you specified the ADF&G, there are other ways to work in fish conservation aside from the law aspect. If you are also interested in fish conservation you might look to a number of federal agencies that have fish conservation arms within them. The Bureau of Land Management, the US Fish and Wildlife, the National Park Service, and the US Forest Service all have some sort of fisheries arm. Many deal with Subisistance and work with local area agencies (Government to Government, dealing with local Native Non-Profit tribes) to assist with fish management.

    Just thought I'd throw that out there.

    Alaska needs good people who not only enjoy the bounty of fish, but are always in need of those who want to help with the preservation of the future health and population of fish resources.

    Yes, I work for one of them and I help coordinate volunteers who come to Alaska and are Alaskans, each year just of give of their time because they care as well.
    The best of luck in your endeavours.

    Thanks for that info TAZ. went out to USA Jobs and started looking. I just have to make the choice if I want to go back to school and sacrifice fun time or not.

    And thanks to the others that have PM'd me with info.

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I haven't worked as a trooper in the state, or F&G. I am aquited with a few though.

    In Alaska it would be tough to define the "typical" F&G trooper. There are those that fly massive expanses in the Brooks Range looking for game violators. Those on boats in the Saltwater. Those along the Kenai river, etc.

    I'd expect that you'd be guranteed to be spending some time in the bush, likely a couple years here and there in small communities. Once you've worked your way up then you'll likely have some say in where you'd like to be stationed. But expect starting out they'll put you where they need you, not put you where you want to go.

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