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Thread: newer raft and would like suggestions

  1. #1
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    Default newer raft and would like suggestions

    i got a 13 x 6 raft non self bailing and i built a frame out of 2x6 wood, please any suggestions and ideas would be appreciated
    before

    after

  2. #2
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default questions-

    Cole,

    What is that yellow piece in your floor? Also, I see the rope securing the frame to the sides of the boat... do you have D-rings or is it a molded rubber fitting? What is the brand of the boat (looks like a Udisco?)

    Thanks!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  3. #3
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    Default

    the yellow is thick foam to add some stregth to the bottom, and it is a riken pioneer. and also it has the metal rings attached to the sides

  4. #4
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Frame

    Welcome aboard Colepiece..
    normally the seat portion is what lays on the tubes, and the length portion sits on top of the seat boards, this way you have a little room to install your risers for your oars... the air space gives you room for nuts and bolts etc. to not get near enough to the raft to puncture or wear on it.
    If you have these sitting on top of the seat bench,you would not need to have the protective foam, as it would not come into contact with the raft material. just swap places with the seat lumber under the length peices.
    what are your plans for the risers?,, and what type of oars and length oars do you have, or plan to have?
    can you tell us the length of your boat, and more important the width?
    this will help decide the length of oars if you don't already have some.
    How are you attaching the frame boards together? using carriage bolts?
    anouther question is what kind of budget do you have for this project?
    If you can spend a few dollars on a couple of pieces of Aluminum pipe, you can do away with the length long boards completely, then use some risers that attach right on the pipe....
    just some thoughts..
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  5. #5
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Frame ideas-

    Cole,

    The NRS Skidguard frame is an example of what Alaskacanoe is saying. HERE'S A LINK; you might get some ideas from this. It might be cheaper to just buy one, unless you are set on doing it yourself.

    He's right about your side rails; they should not be resting on the tubes. If your frame is a square, just flip it over and turn it and you're set. The old raft frames were made of lumber, but they were heavy and prone to wear. One of the modern aluminum frames will last your lifetime. For $100 more than the skidguard frame, you could go with the NRS Longhorn frame. I run one on a round boat I have and it's great. Much lighter and stronger than a wooden frame.

    Even so, if you're set on wood, you'll want some oar stands to bolt on. HERE'S A LINK to what you need. You'll want either oarlocks or pins and stirrups with this setup. You can build the pins yourself, but you'll need to purchase the rubber bumper that goes on top (it keeps someone from getting impaled if they fall on it), but it will probably be cheaper to just buy them already rigged.

    You can get all of this stuff from Alaska Raft and Kayak in Anchorage; they're the Alaska dealer for Northwest River Supplies (NRS).

    Also I'm a bit concerned about that foam piece in the bottom. It's not going to allow your floor to flex like it should and if you run over a rock, you could tear your floor. It will also trap sand and debris and could cause abrasion damage to both your floor and your tubes. Something to consider. Your boat is designed to be tipped over on shore or bailed by hand when it gets water inside. That's going to be difficult with a chunk of foam floating on top. An alternative (if you want a more rigid, insulated floor) is to talk to the boys at Alaska Raft and Kayak about replacing your floor with a self-bailing floor. For this boat it might be prohibitively expensive, but there's no charge for asking...

    Take care,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  6. #6
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    Thumbs up Riken Pioneer

    Here is a little bit of the 411 on your boat:

    Quality depends a bit on the year of manufacture... these are pretty good traditional design non-bailing rubber rafts and generally serve folks quite well at a price point. Tho' attention to basic detail is good --- one typical trait you'll find here is that your boat will feel heavy duty enough, yet more emphasis was placed on lots of softer rubber coating vs. the best base-cloth. By doing this you get a boat that will flex quite a bit even at full air pressure, lag somewhat on handling/performance, and rips can lead to fairly significant tears.

    As Mike Strahan pointed out... bag using much of a bottom devise inside the raft for rivers & streams (moving waters where pulling up on the banks or navigating shallows will be part of the experience). You'll just add safety issues, headaches down the road, and repair time/expenditure to your raft.

    On flat water like a dinghy/tender and using small motors... by all means 'floorboards' are a good thing to have.

    Max was also spot on w/ how to re-orient the 2x6 planks. The seating area needs to at least be flush to the thwarts extending to side tubes. If not your ass will be bouncing up and down, cross boards will stress downward, and you'll be inefficient on the oars.

    Countersinking all hardware is a good practice and get rid of the foam... you want good contact and no slop between boat & frame. Use the D-rings on the side to secure the frame solid.

    Now all you need is these parts:
    http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...23&deptid=1178
    --- pay close attention --- they do not come as a pair!!!
    While these are not the best models to chose from from different supply - they are good and exactly what the you need to pull this frame together. Then get the appropriate related items (like a set of locks) and frame is complete.

    Last suggestion... cut yourself two oversize square or small rectangle 2x6 (one for each side board) and place (like an extra reinforcement shim acting also as a riser) between your side board & metal stand base. This will help prevent wood cracking under torque, give your knees a little more legroom, plus you can have a few more (like 3-4 pairs of holes drilled in fore to aft mostly centered up on each side board for some quick adjust ability).

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