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Thread: How far can you fly per hour?

  1. #1
    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    Default How far can you fly per hour?

    I'm just trying to grasp how far you can get per hour on a bush flight. Seems like most places I've been looking at charge by the hour, I'm wondering how far an hour will get me.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Too many variables

    There are too many variables here. Depends on the plane, terrain, load, good pilot, weather and acts of God. Weather might be good at one end and then you only have to turn around to try another day. 75-90 miles is a guess.

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  3. #3
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Default Flying time

    Lots depends on what type aircraft, weather and winds. I would say in a cub or Beaver 75 to 85 miles, a 206 about 100 miles. Hope this helps. Also, the price per hour, you must calculate x4 for round trip. Example pilot flies you one hour. He goes back to base another hour. He comes to get you 3rd hour and finally flies back to base 4th hour.

  4. #4
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Flight time

    It took 2 1/2 hours from Central, AK to get on the North side of the Brooks, mostly cause we missed our pass due to clouds, so we had to do some canyon turns to gain altitude to get over, although we spent a little time more flying, it was still a flat rate, at no extra cost. But yes, their are unforeseen variables.

  5. #5
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default

    most 206's, 185's will be around 120 MPH but remember by the hour is the WHOLE TIME the plane is in the air..hour out, hour back...pick up is another hour out and hour back. So if you fly one hour from town...you'll pay for 4 hours of flying. some charge extra for landing...or leave the meter running while they unload.
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  6. #6
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default

    As others have said, lots of variables. Keep in mind the clock starts when the engine turns over, so you're paying to taxi and take off, gain altitude etc before you even reach cruise altitude.

    We've chartered about every kind of bush plane there is over the years. Just to give you an idea, we're 160 air miles NE of Fbks.

    Helio - 1hr 40min here (RT 3 hrs 20 min)
    Cub - 2 1/4 hrs here (RT 4 1/2 hrs)
    Cessna 185 - 1hr 30 min here (RT 3 hrs)
    (206 is same as 185)

    That's no wind, calm, no diversions and straight line path the whole way...which happens maybe 10&#37; of the time <grin>. Also that is here on the ground, engine off. Typically a pilot needs to circle a time or two to check strip conditions and wind before landing. If you tell the air charter where you want to go they can generally give you a good estimate of costs. Some air taxis are better than others, pays to ask around and get recommendations.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mossyhorn View Post
    I'm just trying to grasp how far you can get per hour on a bush flight. Seems like most places I've been looking at charge by the hour, I'm wondering how far an hour will get me.

    Thank you.
    Don't forget that if you fly out an hour, you're going to pay for four hours of flight time: Out and back to drop you off (2 hours), then out and back to pick you up (2 more hours).

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Don't forget that if you fly out an hour, you're going to pay for four hours of flight time: Out and back to drop you off (2 hours), then out and back to pick you up (2 more hours).
    And that is if you get skunked, figure FOUR more hours to get the meat and antlers out. And maybe ferry time to a larger lake.

  9. #9
    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    Default

    Wow, that gets pretty expensive real quick. So now charters that charge by the hour that's not per passenger right? I see some places charge a flat rate but it's per person. I've read that with the per hour charge that you can cut costs down if you have someone else or two to split it with. Correct?

    I am moving to Alaska next spring or early summer and I have found myself spending all my spare time immersed in reading and learning everything I can about hunting in Alaska. My biggest problem now is figuring out how to get enough time off work to do everything I want to do up there when I get there!!!

    I have been reading maps, reading the regs, I've ordered books, reading all the archived stuff in this forum, etc. etc. I am so pumped, I appreciate everyone bearing with my questions. I'm just trying to figure out what's doable and what's not. I want to do as much as I possibly can on my own to keep costs down.

    Thanks

  10. #10
    New member akhunter02's Avatar
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    Default It depends

    some charters charge a flat rate for the plane, others by the time the engine is running, others flat rate per person. You also need to check if the rate encludes getting your game out (many dont), many charge for back hauls, some charge a flate rate in and out based on a predetermined amount of weight, anything over that requires a back haul at added exspense. And dont forget the weight they quote you encludes your body weight. For example, they my say we are taking you in a C206, weight allowance is 800lbs. So if you and your partner each weight in at 200lbs that leaves 400lbs for gear

  11. #11
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default

    first thing you'll figure out is alaska ain't cheap to hunt unless you wanna hunt with the crowds. the cheap methods are being hit pretty hard, the more you spend and more research you do ON YOUR OWN the better your hunts will be. don't be a afraid to take the plunge and do a hunt and totally screw it all up...you'll learn so much that way the next trip will be very very satisfying...i've been doing trips over 12 years (about 15-20 trips a year) and i'm still changing cause i learn something new or find something to change to make them better. you can't get that kinda research from the internet.
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  12. #12
    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    If you don't mind me asking, what do you do to find that kind of time to hunt that much a year? I like to think of myself as being a hard working hunter. I hunt in Oregon a lot and have done well and I know that putting the time in is the most important thing. Persistence pays in the end.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by mossyhorn View Post
    ...I have found myself spending all my spare time immersed in reading and learning everything I can about hunting in Alaska. My biggest problem now is figuring out how to get enough time off work to do everything I want to do...
    I think you hit the nail on the head for most guys on the hunting forum...most of us would love about 2 months off every year if we could swing it, just to have time to hunt!

  14. #14

    Default

    Yes, I believe that is the #1 key to what little success I have on my hunt is TIME. I work all year to save up vaction time and work extra comp. time for hunting season. Like this year I only work 14 days during 70 days of hunting season between August 5th-October 17th.

    Sure I could use that comp time to pay for more fly outs and what not, but I'd rather have more time in the field. I really enjoy walk in hunts with my wife which usually take more time but its a vacation to us and enjoy the time spent out hunting together just as much as getting an animal or not.

  15. #15
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default

    mossy i'm a hunting guide with my own business and do all my own guiding so i end up with around 200 days a year in the field...learn alot from goof ups in that amount of time!! hopefully my being in here can help some guys cut some corners off their hunts and avoid some of the mess up that i had to go thru. if i can help..lemme know.
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  16. #16
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    Default usually....

    an air taxi that charges a "flat rate" will include meat transport (but not always - check with the air taxi to be sure). it might be limited to 1 moose per 2 hunters or possibly 1 caribou per hunter, with more animals costing extra. an hourly rate is just that and as others have stated includes the time the plane is deadheading back to base.
    Gary

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