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Thread: Trailer bunks

  1. #1
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default Trailer bunks

    Stupid question... Will just regular pressure treated wood from lowes work to replace my wood trailer bunks?

  2. #2
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    Default

    Sure it will.

  3. #3
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    Default yup

    thats what i used, works good. I pulled off the carpet and re-stapled it to the new bunks. Probably not the smartest thing, as i think the carpet holds the moisture in and makes it rot, but what else am I going to do? I don't like scratches, and i put plenty on the boat running it, so i don't need any more putting it on the trailer!!!

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    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Default

    If you cut the ends you can get stuff from SBS to treat the ends so you do not expose untreated wood.

  5. #5

    Default trex

    anybody ever try trex composite decking or a comparable product? Seems to me the plastic impregnated wood would holp up well...I'd have tried it by now, but none I can find in Bethel...

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  6. #6

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    Trex may work but it is very flexible. I don't know how well that would work. I'm sure it would hold up very well to the water though. We put a piece on a cross section of the trailer because the keel was hitting it and gouging the hull. It sometimes hit a bolt head that stuck up so we put a piece of trex there and it stopped the gouging. Lasted about 4 years and then we sold the boat. I bet its still there though.

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    Well my fiberglass guy says that most hull bottoms he has had to to refinish are most worn on the hull due to the grit (silt, sand, etc) captured in the outdoors carpet that everyone uses to cover their bunks. When I showed him a piece of Trex (which I was planning on using as the bunk framing material, he said " just use this alone without the carpet so it won't hold any silt or sand like carpet would and you will be good". He said the Trex is softer then the gelcoat and won't scratch it up. I will be trying this out next summer.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bethell View Post
    anybody ever try trex composite decking or a comparable product? Seems to me the plastic impregnated wood would holp up well...I'd have tried it by now, but none I can find in Bethel...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bethell View Post
    anybody ever try trex composite decking or a comparable product? Seems to me the plastic impregnated wood would holp up well...I'd have tried it by now, but none I can find in Bethel...
    Try the Lumber Yard yet?

  9. #9
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    Default Treated lumber plus UHMW

    I'd go with treated lumber with UHMW screwed into the top. CAC Plastics in Wasilla used to have a scrap bin full of UHMW for a couple of bucks apiece.

  10. #10

    Default Trex

    TREX and any other composite decking is NON structural. That the reason you do not find beams and timbers made our of composite material and also why the joists on a TREX deck must be 16" OC.

    I would not put my skiff on a TREX bunk.

    I like TREX, but that is not what it is made for.

    Tom

  11. #11
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    The framework on the trailer is the ONLY structural support. The bunks are only the surface of the hull transmitting the force (load) to the trailer framework. I have seen 30'+ boats on 2X6's for bunks bolted to the framework of the trailer. The Trex is NOT carrying the full load of the boat - it is only transferring that load to the framework of the trailer - hope that clears it up for you.


    Quote Originally Posted by Cresent Hills View Post
    TREX and any other composite decking is NON structural. That the reason you do not find beams and timbers made our of composite material and also why the joists on a TREX deck must be 16" OC.

    I would not put my skiff on a TREX bunk.

    I like TREX, but that is not what it is made for.

    Tom

  12. #12
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cresent Hills View Post
    TREX and any other composite decking is NON structural. That the reason you do not find beams and timbers made our of composite material and also why the joists on a TREX deck must be 16" OC.

    I would not put my skiff on a TREX bunk.

    I like TREX, but that is not what it is made for.

    Tom
    Tom,
    I with you. That stuff would eventually sag in between the supports. I have a 16' piece left over from a project laying in the backyard and it looks like a limp noodle laying on uneven ground. I remember picking it up in the middle and it was dragging on the ground at both ends.

    I have alunimum bunks (2" by 4" rectangle) with UHMW attached. Have not seen another trailer like it in a while. Way nice setup.

  13. #13
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Default

    The problem with preassure treated is the chemicals used to treat it will eat the hardware used to install it on the trailer.
    Most guys will use pine or cedar and put several coats of varathane on them before recarpeting.
    I just did mine a couple of weeks ago and did it that way.

  14. #14
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Default Trex is great

    Trex decking works excellent for bunks and supports. No worries on rot and as others have stated, no carpeting or debris to worry about.
    Look at Greatland Welding's boats and trailers that he has been building. All his trailers are equipped w/trex. Been doinf it for years and they hold up well. I'll replace mine w/trex when they wear out.
    See for yourself at the Lil Su boat launch as many of his boats are down there.
    BK

  15. #15
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    Default

    The red colored outdoor lumber will not react with the metal like the green pressure treated lumber will. The trex is indeed like a wet noodle and will sag between the supports eventually but it won't rot. It's very expensive though.

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