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Thread: Zeroing´new scope

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    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Post Zeroing´new scope

    How do you go about zeroing in a new scope?At what distance do you sight in?

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Thumbs up heres what I do....

    If you have a laser bore sighter, use it to get on the paper.
    I don't, so....
    I attach my scope and head to the range. Here's what I do: Be sure to use a gun vise to hold your rifle. Its WORTH the extra few bucks for one. This is necessary for this technique to work. It will minimize the movement which will allow you to get on the money immediately. It will save you ammo $ in the long run too.
    Vise clamp your gun down and pull the bolt out. (I'm assuming you have a bolt action.) sit back and look through the bore to your target at fifty yards. Line up the bore and then look through the scope and get them close on the bullseye.
    When you feel your relatively close to the target, pop the bolt back in and take a shot at the bullseye at the 50 yard target. Load another round and do the same thing EXCEPT after you line up the crosshairs on the bullseye, crank your scope cross hairs to your last shot taken. Be sure to not move your gun after eyeing the bullseye and then moving to the new location.
    Bingo! you should be on target or very close. Several shots may help, but isnt always necessary. Move your target out to 100 and pop one off. I'm usually looking to be about 2" high at 100 to be on target at about 200-215 yards. Move your target out to 150 and then 200 and get comfortable with it.
    I've dead zeroed guns with two shots!!
    Hope this helps....Frank

  3. #3
    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Thank you!

    Thanks a lot Frank!I really appreciate it!

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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Great Explanation Frank!

    I follow that exact same procedure and it does work. I used to sight rifles back home and did the exact same thing and added a third shot further out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullkurl View Post
    If you have a laser bore sighter, use it to get on the paper.
    I don't, so....
    I attach my scope and head to the range. Here's what I do: Be sure to use a gun vise to hold your rifle. Its WORTH the extra few bucks for one. This is necessary for this technique to work. It will minimize the movement which will allow you to get on the money immediately. It will save you ammo $ in the long run too.
    Vise clamp your gun down and pull the bolt out. (I'm assuming you have a bolt action.) sit back and look through the bore to your target at fifty yards. Line up the bore and then look through the scope and get them close on the bullseye.
    When you feel your relatively close to the target, pop the bolt back in and take a shot at the bullseye at the 50 yard target. Load another round and do the same thing EXCEPT after you line up the crosshairs on the bullseye, crank your scope cross hairs to your last shot taken. Be sure to not move your gun after eyeing the bullseye and then moving to the new location.
    Bingo! you should be on target or very close. Several shots may help, but isnt always necessary. Move your target out to 100 and pop one off. I'm usually looking to be about 2" high at 100 to be on target at about 200-215 yards. Move your target out to 150 and then 200 and get comfortable with it.
    I've dead zeroed guns with two shots!!
    Hope this helps....Frank


    Good post but fire 3 shots and then move your crosshairs to the center of the group.

    I use a bore sighter in my living room and then go too the range and shoot for group at 100 yards. After you get your 3 shot group at 100 yards make the approriate scope changes and then shoot for group again. Being a handloader I don't worry too much about the number of rounds it takes to get the group to shoot where I want it. The bore sighter will get you on paper at 100 yards.

  6. #6
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    Default Another hint

    Here is another hint. I look for my load on the RemShoot program. It is easy to play with and you can adjust for your maxinum range for a give round. I then print it our and go to the range. Once sighted in, I check the ballistics at several yardages to see if they match the program. They are usually pretty close.

    I then go home and type out the yardages and +or- distances on WMS Word, print it, and tape it to the bell on the rear of the scope. That way, if I ever see that ram of a lifetime at a given distance and need to put her in there, I have a reference for all the yardages out to 500 yards. (NO, I am not a 500 yard shooter.)(Prefer a bow).

    Just a hint for failing memories.
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    Franks (fullkurl) description is spot on with what I do. Never have had the desire to buy all the fancy laser boresighters, that old school way has always worked well for me. The only thing that I would reccommend is when making adjustments to your scope only move one way at a time. For example if your shooting high and left make your adjustments to the right and once you have your windage right make your elevation (up and down) adjustments and your good to go. That little tip can possibly save you a little frustration.

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    100m and 4cm higher than zero...
    I guess that´s about 100-120 yards and 1,5 inches higher than zero...

    Klaus

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    Ditto what fullkurl said.

    The greater your bore sight distance (peeking through the barrel) the closer you will be firing live ammunition.

  10. #10
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Thumbs up what fun is two shots?

    I was over at Johnsons gun range in Sterling awhile back and watched a couple of fellows shoot up a box of ammo....
    I finally asked if I could help, I told them I was no expert, but I had some time behind a rifle or two.. First I pulled all the loose screws from the mounts, and set them with some locktite. snugged them up and then bore sighted as Frank suggested,, ( its amazing that the cross hairs and the bore should be lined up ) At least thats what these fellows were saying..lol
    I buried that gun in sandbags, and touched her off....
    at 50yds, I adjusted it twice and then said ,,have fun..
    they shot anouther box, and concluded that the gun was a no good SOB.
    I asked If I could shoot it again, and they said OK,, I shot two in the nickle @ 100yds.
    they left......
    You can't help those that won't be students.
    My son and his buddy that doesn't have a dad around shot about a million rounds of dads ammo...
    We went home and reloaded it all back up... 2.5 hrs of pulling the levers on the Rockchucker, and using the trickle charger etc...
    They did not realize how much time it takes to load ammo right, and now I think they will be a little more stingy with the shooting, as I told them you have to replace what you shoot...
    It was so much fun to watch those boys enjoy shooting dots,,, I think we will do it again,, soon..
    Max
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    Max-
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    Default 3 Shot groups.

    I agree with the vise method. But I shoot 3 shot groups and adjust from the center of the group. I also adjust up/down then reshoot a 3 round group, then adjust the left/right and reshoot a 3 round group. But I do one other small detail. After I make any adjustment to my scope, I lightly tap the scope on the adjustment knobs. This makes sure I get the full adjustment. Remember tap, not beat the scope.

  13. #13

    Default If you don't have a vise...

    If you don't have a vise to use, try sighting in at 25 yards first. Most rifle calibers sighted in @ 25 yards will be just about dead-on at 100 yards. Because each click will adjust most scopes 1/4 inch @ 100 yards, when you adjust for windage multiply the number of clicks x4. This will get you dialed in pretty quickly, without using too much ammo. Then you can fine tune your zero where you want it @ 100 yards (I usually go 1-2 inches high).

  14. #14
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    Thumbs up Zeroing a scope

    Shepherd scope.... One shot zero...

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default elaborate, TMA

    My good friend has missed two sheep in two years with a Shepherd scope. Human error?, I 'spose. He still swears by it. I'd swear at it.
    I'd like to hear more, though.



    Frank

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    Default Shepherd scope

    I would also like to hear more about this scope. I have seen the ads in Shotgun News and other papers, but still have doubts. Tell us more please.

    Thanks

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    Shepard scopes are calibrated for specific bullet weight and caliber at specific velocities. That too me is the big drawback too using them. You can't swap the scope from one rifle to another in a different caliber.

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    Default Shepherd Scope

    I too was very skeptical about these scopes – both their abilities and the one shot zero but I decided to buy one to see. They are indeed everything that they are advertised to be!

    They make several models and each is good for a number of different calibers (there is chart on their web site listing a portion of the calibers so while they are not necessarily calibrated to a certain caliber, they are divided into useable groups.

    Their website is http://www.shepherdscopes.com/index.asp . They have allot of information regarding the “how-to’s”, the why’s and their compatibility charts. They also have a catalog with additional information. You will probably gain more from those than if I rattled on here for countless hours. While it is their own site and its sole purpose is to sell scopes. I have found the information to be accurate.

    I have the V1 which is a 6X18X40. The cost for this scope is $700 (other models $600) wherever you buy it – from Shepherd or a dealer, so it’s comparable to other midrange priced scopes. The adjustments are easy and the glass has incredible clarity. It takes a bit to get used to how it works and it may be considered a little “busy” buy some when looking through it. Once you get used to it, it will quickly become a favorite. Mine is on a Remington 700PSS (.300 Win Mag) and I love it.

    As far as someone missing with it, I would have to say that it’s not the scope. Anything’s possible but ass everyone knows all too well, miss can be attributed to any number of things – mostly the guy looking through the scope.

    If your in Valdez, and would like to shoot it or at least fondle it, I’d probably be willing to let you do it as long as you wiped the drool off afterwards. I go to the range quite a bit when the wind isn’t blowing 90 mph off the glacier like it has been for the last week.

    Tim
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  19. #19
    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Amazing!

    Wow thats amazing if you can zero in with just one shot!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlleninAlaska View Post
    You can't swap the scope from one rifle to another in a different caliber.
    Hi Allen, You could do!

    When adjustment is made on the gun, You could swap from one to another: I use my Rem Titanium .30-06 with my Winchester 70 in .375H&H and would be able to use any other bolt action with the same scope!!! It´s a tricky thing, but that´s what my Titanium scope mount is build for...! Using one scope on different guns without rezeroing between swapping!

    Klaus

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