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Thread: Kayaking with a knee problem

  1. #1
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    Default Kayaking with a knee problem

    My wife and I have never kayak'd but would like to try it out. She has one knee that is not too flexible and I am just old and not a good swimmer. Is there instruction/rentals available in the Denali area (we live in the Fairbanks area) that anyone can recommend? Or should we just stay on land?
    Thanks!!!

  2. #2

    Default Try inflatables???

    Don't know about instructions, but inflatable's are soft, comfortable, and don't tip like a hardshell. You can just lay in some of them like a bed if you had to! Just did Ressurection river in Seward today, was incredible! Last week, did Portage from Portage lake. I go out of Seward, PWS, really all over in them, even take them on vacations.
    Just an idea if you want something that will get you out there without the learning curve of a hardshell. -Good luck

  3. #3
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    Thumbs up

    Locally Denali Outdoor Center is a possibility located in the heart of Denali.

    That said, my recommendation would be to use my services at ALASKA RAFT CONNECTION and try the inflatable self-bailing Kayak rental with dry-land and on-water instruction.

    The reason I gave you my 'connection' is that my best suggestion would be that you not only see how the kayaks may work for you... but better yet... discover another great option trying one person cat rafts that are very forgiving (confidence building), easier to get in and out (when flexibility or age gets to be part of the persuasion), plus the ability to paddle/row comfortably for a day's outing.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    Don't know about instructions, but inflatable's are soft, comfortable, and don't tip like a hardshell. You can just lay in some of them like a bed if you had to! Just did Ressurection river in Seward today, was incredible! Last week, did Portage from Portage lake. I go out of Seward, PWS, really all over in them, even take them on vacations.
    Just an idea if you want something that will get you out there without the learning curve of a hardshell. -Good luck
    My concern with inflatables would be punctures...or should this not be a concern? Thanks for your input!!!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Richardson View Post
    Locally Denali Outdoor Center is a possibility located in the heart of Denali.

    That said, my recommendation would be to use my services at ALASKA RAFT CONNECTION and try the inflatable self-bailing Kayak rental with dry-land and on-water instruction.

    The reason I gave you my 'connection' is that my best suggestion would be that you not only see how the kayaks may work for you... but better yet... discover another great option trying one person cat rafts that are very forgiving (confidence building), easier to get in and out (when flexibility or age gets to be part of the persuasion), plus the ability to paddle/row comfortably for a day's outing.
    Brian..thanks for the advice. Will contact the Denali folks first and when we get more than a couple days free (later in the summer) will go to Anchorage. Looks like fun!

  6. #6
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    Smile Inflatable Kayaks

    We do offer Statewide services and instruct on the Nenana mostly for intermediate through advanced whitewater rafting.

    On the upper stretches tho' there is very nice class I & 2... great for learning... excellent put-ins and take-outs along the scenic Denali Highway.

    Punctures in the best quality Inflatable Kayaks will not be any real issue or much of a concern. These boats include nearly bombproof fabrication with excellent customer warranty --- that in turn will also long-term protect your investment.

    Please take a look at http://alaskaraftconnection.com/msg6.htm

    Nearing the bottom of the page... it will show kayaks, personal cats, and canoes illustrating just what kind of fun, forgiveness, confidence, and comfort can be had by first timers using these kinds of inflatable boats.

  7. #7

    Smile Bomb proof proven again and again...

    I have three inflatables (use to have four) all are extremely different from each other, cost wise, quality wise, style, and type. Everyone has been through the worst it gets, baked, frozen, airline tested, dragged in shallow water, dragged on dry land, tree crossings in the rapids, all kinds of stuff. No scratches, no tears, no marks, look as if they were in there first season! Yes, bomb proof!
    I look at it this way; If you puncture one or tear it, someone is injuried or dead.

  8. #8
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    Default IK's

    Keep in mind we are talking about IK's with some quality, such as NRS, AIRE, ect. You can easily pop the cheap un-reinforced vinyl kayaks made my sevylor and a few other companies. But, sevylor makes some decent kayaks as well. I use Aire tomcat solo's which are on the cheap end of quality boats, and mine have been through hell, wrapped around fairly sharp rocks, slammed into sharp pointy spruce strainers, and drug across the sharp shale of prince william sound, and they have yet to leak any air. They barely even show wear on the pvc outer layer. I even found pieces of shale between the floor and the vinyl bladder and it held up. They are definitely the way to go when knees and backs are a problem. They even make some rather impressive inflatable sea kayaks that glide and track like I never thought possible in an inflatable.

    Chris

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    Default

    I just wanted to chime in. Don't think that you have to go with an inflatable with knee problems. I have bad knees and I paddle a plastic boat without any problems. I've never paddled an inflatable so I don't know how much difference they make but kayaking does not stress the knees much so I don't think it'll be that big of an issue no matter what boat type you choose.

    My advice would be to try out lots of different boats and see what you like. Try to find a dealer near you that has demo days. Most good dealers will give you a chance to paddle to boat before you buy. Or rent a few times trying different boats each time.

  10. #10
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    Default

    http://www.inflatable-kayaks-guide.c...ble-kayak.html

    I found this "review" website for inflatibles. Looking for similar for "plastic".
    Do you guys agree with the opinions expressed?

    As far as quality top of the line inflatable or plastic what are your opinions?

    I appreciate your time!!!!!

  11. #11
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    Smile I'd have to say...

    I'd give mostly thumbs shaking sideways (not really up - not too down) to the site you referenced in general.

    Most of the content I browsed briefly (I'm familiar w/ the site) in some places can be somewhat off-base to flat misguidance if referencing it for similarities to boating in Alaska. After all it's based in NC.

    ie. even suggesting sevy and sea-e in the prescribed category with the added b.s. commentary sounds a little fishy - maybe bought and paid for a bit so to speak.

    Knocking AIRE lynx series a little in their IK review section in terms of...
    "This two layer system makes maintenance and repair of the Aire inflatable kayak much more difficult than most other rafts."
    IS WRONG to misleading!!!
    AND...
    "While the Aire Lynx is priced very fairly, you can get a boat from other manufacturers (Hyside, Custom Inflatables, NRS) that will cost you a few hundred dollars less and still do anything a non-commercial user would need."
    This is also WRONG & not the way to go about IK purchase or long term use in ALASKA!!!

    Some of their content is contradictory... just one big one here to the link you posted:
    "We learned about inflatables from the school of hard knocks. In our early years we had lower end boats and used boats. Since the mid 1990's, we've used top of the line commercial boats."

    Simply said --- just not comparing apples, oranges, grapefruits, etc.

    There truly are significant differences in these IK boats.

    Sure... You have to look at price, yet really investigate as to why some boats are inexpensive, what makes up the middle ground, to the expensive.

    Yes... you should look at and understand economy construction on up to commercial grade manufacture.

    Availability, warranty and repair issues are important...

    However... the reliability/dependability when in your hands supported by knowledgeable/experienced, helpful, efficient, organized, & accountable customer service on any brand, model, both sales side or repair side is of far greater importance.

    Realize that this outfitter is located in North Carolina likely dealing in high volume customer bases on some easier streams from youth group outings to tourist season and also probably does do challenging whitewater trips... rivers like the Nantahala Whitewater are world famous and the mountain streams are beautiful. I'm pretty dang convinced they aint runnin' routine trips on the Nantahala whitewater w/ cheapo sevy and sea-e.

    I'd take the site you posted based on some of it's merits... they are endeavoring to be helpful and informative. Also read into some of the claims taking notice to some of the contradictions with in its content.

  12. #12

    Default

    I have to agree with ChrisS... I have a knee replacement and it doesn't give me any trouble kayaking and I ride all types of plastics. I've never tried an inflatable but I've done week long trips in my ocean kayaks without a problem and my Wilderness Systems sit-in is about as comfy a boat as I've had the pleasure of using.

  13. #13

    Default

    I have to agree with ChrisS... I have a knee replacement and it doesn't give me any trouble kayaking and I ride all types of plastics. I've never tried an inflatable but I've done week long trips in my ocean kayaks without a problem and my Wilderness Systems sit-in is about as comfy a boat as I've had the pleasure of using.

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