Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: drift boat owners

  1. #1
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default drift boat owners

    I am looking for some input from the drift boat owners out there. I am buying a boat in the spring, and am trying to figure out exactly what I want. I am leaning towards a 17'x60" aluminum boat, Willies has some pretty good deals on their site. Anybody run a boat this size? I am looking for a boat for 2 people to fish out of, with the option of being able to put a third person in. I have fished from a few 20ft guide boats, but nothing smaller. I am also curious about fiberglass boats. Anybody row a glass boat? From what I have read, they are heavier, but a little smoother ride in rough water, but the durability worries me a little. I know most manufacturers have a great warranty, but if you have to ship it back to the pacific northwest for repair, that would add up fast.

    I know some people will reccomend getting a raft, and I thought about it, but I really want a drift boat. I will be fishing mostly the Kenai, so I think the boat is the best choice for me. I have a one man raft for fishing the valley, so the boat is just for the kenai Penn. Thanks.


    Jake
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

  2. #2
    Member Tight Lines's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Campbell, CA
    Posts
    218

    Talking Drifty

    I have a 16X54 FishRite and fish up to 3 in the front seat (pulling plugs or back bouncing). One thing I found out after getting a drift boat is you canít row and fish at the same time. So unless you become a bolder (on anchor) you donít fish.

  3. #3
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default rowing and fishing

    Thanks for the info, I am aware of the no fishing while rowing rowing business. I was talking about having 2 seats in the front, and one seat behind the oarsman for the third person. How does the 16ft row with 3 in the front? That would be nightmare with 3 people flyfishing up front.

    Jake
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

  4. #4
    Member Tight Lines's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Campbell, CA
    Posts
    218

    Wink Row, Row, Row your boat!!!

    As far as rowing goes three in the front is easier that two in front and one in back. The two in front and one in back set up works but you must make sure the transom stays out of the water or you will be pushed down stream.

    Dave

    Never tell people your problems, half of them don't care, and the other half think you deserve it .

  5. #5
    Member Mark Collett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Between the Willapa Rivers, United States
    Posts
    467

    Talking Lots of Options

    Jake,
    Getting a drift-boat opens a lot of doors,so do your homework before you decide what kind/style of boat to get.There are many quality boats being made by many different manufacturers,I'd suggest hitting the many websites available,check out various styles,sizes,and configuration then take the plunge.
    I've been on the oars for over 25 years,mostly on the Olympic Peninsula,but also a few years up here on the Kenai.I've rowed glass boats,metal boats,and even a few wood boats.There are advantages for each kind .While fiberglass boats can be damaged by rocks, trees,and other obstacles,the same can be said of other materials as well.However all can be repaired if/when the need arises.With a glass boat if you poke a hole in it you can get a fiberglass repair kit at your local hardware store.If you poke a hole in an aluminum boat they will need to be welded back together which is a little more costly in time and money.Wood boats can be beautiful to look at but require a lot of maintenence to stay that way.As for driftability,my personal choice is a fiberglass boat.They will slide over rocks better than an aluminum boat which tend to stick on rocks in a low water situation.If you plan on running into a lot of stumps,sweepers,or boulders then an aluminum boat can be a tougher boat as metal won't crack as easily as glass.Metal boats always feel colder to me glass boats seem to have a warmer feel.Whichever you choose a driftboat is a great way to spend time on the water.
    As far as being able to fish while you're on the oars------I have to disagree with you and tightlines as I've caught many fish while going solo.When I built my mini-drifter I planted a pole holder just behind the oarlock on the right side.Put your pole in there and you can pull plugs all day long Plus when you are on the oars you control where the plug is working by how you position the boat.Just keep an eye out on your path and work the boat where you want your plug to go.The same can be said if you are fishing a diver and SNG with eggs.Make the boat do the work.I've seen so many people fighting against the current when they really don't have to.It's all about letting the water be your friend not an advesary.Learn to read the water and relax.If you are not comfortable fishing alone teach you fishing buddy how to row and take turns on the oars.That can be entertaining and fun as well.Said and done-------welcome to the world of the drifter---it's a wonderful world......

  6. #6
    Member TYNMON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Corvallis, Oregon, United States
    Posts
    918

    Default If you really want to fish three in a drift boat...

    Quote Originally Posted by jakec5253 View Post
    Thanks for the info, I am aware of the no fishing while rowing rowing business. I was talking about having 2 seats in the front, and one seat behind the oarsman for the third person. How does the 16ft row with 3 in the front? That would be nightmare with 3 people flyfishing up front.

    Jake
    Not sure the size of ppl we are talking about here... But to displace the weight, the bigger the boat the better.... Consider a 18 X 72, 19 X 72, and or 19 X 66.... These bigger boats are much more confortable to fish out of and you can actually walk aroun din them and still fill secure.... I have a 20 X 72 and on of my good friends has a even nice 17 X 60.... You know which boat we both preffer to fish out of even when it is just the tow of us? You got it the 20 X 72.... Esp with two or three is is really nice to fish out of... My 20" boat will fish on in the front, once center, and one aft very compfatably... This is a great way to go for trout and steelhead while fishing on the move.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jakec5253 View Post
    From what I have read, they are heavier, but a little smoother ride in rough water, but the durability worries me a little. I know most manufacturers have a great warranty, but if you have to ship it back to the pacific northwest for repair, that would add up fast.




    Jake

    I'm pretty sure fiberglass is actually lighter. As far as warranty concerns, I think Clackacraft has authorized warranty repair centers so you don't have to take it too the company to get it repaired, you might call them and ask about that. Don't forget Lavro's either. . .they have (or had) a cool video on their site about the pro's of glass.

    I too have rowed a lot of different boats for work and pleasure. I have to say that I like fiberglass also. The only reason I think I would own a metal boat for in Alaska is so I could have a heater and not worry about catching the boat on fire (although I use a propane heater in my fiberglass boat now with little worry). If your going to be rowing in any low water, gravel bar type situations on a regular basis, seriously consider glass.

  8. #8
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default boat size

    Quote Originally Posted by TYNMON View Post
    Not sure the size of ppl we are talking about here... But to displace the weight, the bigger the boat the better.... Consider a 18 X 72, 19 X 72, and or 19 X 66.... These bigger boats are much more confortable to fish out of and you can actually walk aroun din them and still fill secure.... I have a 20 X 72 and on of my good friends has a even nice 17 X 60.... You know which boat we both preffer to fish out of even when it is just the tow of us? You got it the 20 X 72.... Esp with two or three is is really nice to fish out of... My 20" boat will fish on in the front, once center, and one aft very compfatably... This is a great way to go for trout and steelhead while fishing on the move.
    I agree that a bigger boat would be more comfortable for 3 people, just like a 40ft motorhome would be more comfortable than a pop up tent trailer, but a 20ft boat is out of my price range. I am looking for a boat that can fish one or two people most of the time, with the ability to put a third person in occationally. I have been reading as much as I can online, and to me it seems like a 17' boat would be the best compromise for my needs. Thanks to everyone for the input, please keep it coming.


    Jake
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

  9. #9

    Default

    There are 2 more options you did not mention- composite and plastic. An outfit called freestone boats, or something similar, makes some very cool looking boats that use some sort of super fiberglass with kevlar or some such. It's a small company, but they seem like serious boats.

    Boulder Boat works makes drift boats out of the same plastic that whitewater kayaks are made out of. Last year I saw a few on the Kenai, and I saw a guide in one this year. I have not rowed one yet, but the guys I have talked to say they row really well and that they are really light. I think plastic has nothing but advantages over glass and particularly over aluminum. It would stay warm to the touch like fiberglass, be quiet like fiberglass (and not GONG like aluminum), slide over rocks, weighs the least of any material, looks like painted wood, and is virtually indestructible- if my experience with kayaks holds true.

    Hog Island boats are also made of plastic, but I think they look kind of ugly, and they weigh too much.

    Good luck in your search.
    Doug

  10. #10
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default wood boats

    Anyone rowing a wood drifter? They are beautiful, but I am curious about how much goes into maintaining one. How do they handle compared to other boats?


    Jake
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

  11. #11
    Member TYNMON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Corvallis, Oregon, United States
    Posts
    918

    Default Wood boat are awsome...but not really..

    Quote Originally Posted by jakec5253 View Post
    Anyone rowing a wood drifter? They are beautiful, but I am curious about how much goes into maintaining one. How do they handle compared to other boats?


    Jake
    Wood float hihere in the water then Aluminium or Fiberglass and they row very light and nimble... Unfortunately they are a maintenace nightmare and it is very important to store them inside, esp w/ AK elements at work. Just the everyday scrubbing of the indide that you wouldn't bat an eye for a metal boat, would be very hard on varnish.

  12. #12
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default wood boat

    Quote Originally Posted by TYNMON View Post
    Wood float hihere in the water then Aluminium or Fiberglass and they row very light and nimble... Unfortunately they are a maintenace nightmare and it is very important to store them inside, esp w/ AK elements at work. Just the everyday scrubbing of the indide that you wouldn't bat an eye for a metal boat, would be very hard on varnish.
    Thanks for the info. That is kind of what I figured, and is more work than I want to do. But man are those boats pretty!


    Jake
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •