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Thread: Salmon meat yield?

  1. #1
    Member Crab_n_fish's Avatar
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    Default Salmon meat yield?

    I've seen online charts for how much meat one will get off a given size halibut - i.e., a forty pounder will dress-out up to sixty percent of its weight with (presumably) no bones attached, or about twenty-four lbs.

    However, not knowing the formula of live weight versus dead weight when it comes time to field dressing, this chart then becomes a little puzzling:

    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/halibutcharts.htm

    That same forty lber yields thirty pounds of meat. I guess the bones and head/cheeks are included?

    What is the ratio for the average King or Red salmon, for salmon filets with belly meat attached and ribs removed? An inquiring and fast-emptying freezer wants to know!

  2. #2

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    Depends who is doing it but generally speaking you want to shoot for 60/40 (i.e. 60% meat).

  3. #3
    Member Crab_n_fish's Avatar
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    What sparked this inquiry was my cousins recent halibut trip out of Ninilchik a couple weeks ago, when he came home with 84 lbs of boneless halibut filets. I posted the live weight of the fish in my journal, and
    the resultant yield matched the 60/40 ratio very closely. Then I read a post today, on this
    very site, comparing what a fresh caught king would price at the
    grocery store upon dressing.

    For example, a twenty lb king would dress out at, oh let's say, twelve lbs.
    That 12 lbs x 13.99/lb at the local fish market would come to the equivalent of your catch as a nearly $168.00 fish!

    Basically, that one fish "paid for" that new Penn Spinfisher SS reel I just bought! Woooohooo! (Sometimes ya gotta rationalize
    your expenses with your woman, ya know?!!!) ...thanks!

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    Member nategr's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crab_n_fish View Post
    What sparked this inquiry was my cousins recent halibut trip out of Ninilchik a couple weeks ago, when he came home with 84 lbs of boneless halibut filets. I posted the live weight of the fish in my journal, and
    the resultant yield matched the 60/40 ratio very closely. Then I read a post today, on this
    very site, comparing what a fresh caught king would price at the
    grocery store upon dressing.

    For example, a twenty lb king would dress out at, oh let's say, twelve lbs.
    That 12 lbs x 13.99/lb at the local fish market would come to the equivalent of your catch as a nearly $168.00 fish!

    Basically, that one fish "paid for" that new Penn Spinfisher SS reel I just bought! Woooohooo! (Sometimes ya gotta rationalize
    your expenses with your woman, ya know?!!!) ...thanks!

    Your paying too much at 13.99, oh what, you said rationalize, you mean at 17.99/lb Get ya a loomis to go with that penn SS.

    Not to get off track, I have two penn slammers, ones a little older than the other, One has the made in the USA on it, guess where the other is made.

  5. #5
    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Default Spot on....

    Quote Originally Posted by Whiskeypeet View Post
    Depends who is doing it but generally speaking you want to shoot for 60/40 (i.e. 60% meat).
    This is correct... I would add that wtih salmon depending on the body condition the meat to weight yeild would be 40-60% of the total weight.... 1-3% dehyration rate is commonly accepted for total weights of fish after several hour out of the water.

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    Default More bang for your buck...

    Often times the blade removes the fillet and then head, viscera, and bones are tossed.

    In that batch is a prize called the collar; the area that protects the gills with hard plate and flesh.

    Remove it and you will find a tasty addition that is great for the base in fish stock (as are bones and tail) while at the same time after cooked and cooled, removed and picked through for meat.

    This certainly is not my idea, it is a First Nation skill learned years ago from those who waste nothing.

    As to skin, scale it before removing it, then cut it up for flour and fast fry chips.

    Though it's your buck, you can do the same with a hen...

    Rosenberg/Florida
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


  7. #7
    Member Crab_n_fish's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nategr View Post
    Your paying too much at 13.99, oh what, you said rationalize, you mean at 17.99/lb Get ya a loomis to go with that penn SS.

    Not to get off track, I have two penn slammers, ones a little older than the other, One has the made in the USA on it, guess where the other is made.
    I was throwing out a figure, Nate! I'm not sure what fish cost per say, at any given local Wasilla seafood counter, and that is because I have no need to buy it when I can catch it! (I do know, however, that Copper River Kings are over 20 bucks per lb...maybe near 30 by now!)

    (source:

    http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/newsr...ry/408145.html )

    In all seriousness, though, having grown up in Texas, both inland and on the coast, Penn reels are tops to many serious salt fishermen, and to a lesser extent on freshwater lakes/rivers. You have good reels in either the Slammer or Spinfisher series. I've owned two 9500SSm
    (eggbeaters) and loved 'em!

    Yep, its sad that Shakespeare bought the Penn company -- and reels are now coming from China...Hopefully Zebco doesn't have new competition now! (Then again, Penn does make the lower-level CV series!)

    A forum link on the purchase:

    http://www.rodbuilding.org/read.php?2,217951,218124

    Notice all the puzzled people?!
    --

    Tynmon, thank you for the great reply. It just dawned on me that egg sacs can get quite heavy too, and are indeed a factor.

    Also, I remembered fish shrinkage when ya land that slot limit speckled trout on the Texas Coast. Yeah, it may have barely made the minimun 15" mark, yet on ice it may lose a fraction of an inch and the game warden will soon be writing ya a ticket!
    --
    Bernard, your reply was excellent as well...Noting that you live in Florida, you probably know that Redfish heads are great on the BBQ grill! I've always saved a few for that one day friends came over, huddled around the pit with adult bevarages and let that mighty fine meal drive us nuts as it slowly cooked. Also loved that redfish on the half-shell! *Yummy*!!!!

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