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Thread: Sticky cases

  1. #1
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    Default Sticky cases

    I need a hand here Gents, my cases are sticky. The facts: once fired factory loaded brass full lenght resized, mic'ed and cleaned. The problem: the rifle bolt is hard closing and the rub seems to be on the outside edge of the rims. These rounds were fired out of this rifle. Mdl pre-64 win 70 .338 win mag, Win brass plain and Federal plated, RCBS dies. Am I doing something wrong or is there a fix. Thanks in advance.
    Pete

  2. #2
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    Have you checked case length? Also is the bullet being forced into the lands? What happens when you try to chamber a resized but unloaded case?

  3. #3
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    Thank you for your suggestions. This is happening with unloaded cases. They are once fired out of this rifle. I measured the case lenght with a digital micrometer and trimmed if necessary. I have also looked over the bolt head. When I sand the rim edge with emory cloth the closure gets easier. ?????

  4. #4
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    I use a magic marker and paint the case. Chamber that and remove to check for tight spots. If the cases came out of the gun easily then it must be something you have done or it would fit back nicely. My first guess is oal to long for that bullet. Paint the bullet first and load and remove it and check for rifling marks. And so on. Make sure you are getting full lenght sizing as partial sizing can push the shoulder forward a little. Are you saying that without even sizing this happens? If so, check for out of round on the cases. By sanding the rim ,are you talking of the extractor rim or the neck rim?

  5. #5
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    Default Most likely

    Assuming Fired cases chamber OK,

    And, Sized cases Don't,

    You ain't sizing them enough.

    (Screw down your sizing die, some more.)

    That should probably do it. If it don't, then maybe you have flex in the press, and need a heavier press, more lube, other sizing issues.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  6. #6
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    After reading Smitty's post, I'm thinking that perhaps I haven't been using enough lube and the rims are getting a tiny bit deformed upon removal from the die. Whatever is happening is occuring between the chamber and priming.
    pete

  7. #7
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    Default shoulder bump

    Although it would be a bit surprising after one firing, I would have to agree with Smitty and say it's not over all case length (to the neck) but rather the length to the shoulder. As rbuck pointed out, painting the case neck and shoulder and chambering a case should help find out exactly what is going on, but I'm going to guess that you need to bump the shoulder back further. I would say heads-spacing could be an issue, but as I read it the fact that the cases chambered easily on the first firing would rule that out. I doubt that you are messing up the base/belt of the case by using too little lube. You would have cases getting stuck in the die long before you began damaging cases from too much push or pull on the base.

    As Smitty said, try screwing your die in a little deeper, although not beyond the point where you get *light* pressure between the die and the shell casing. This should bump our shoulder a little further back and make the cases easier to chamber again.

    As a matter of fact, this is how I set my full length dies. I neck size only until cases get sticky when chambering. Then I'll take several of the sticky cases and resize them, starting with the FL resizing die screwed pretty far out. After resizing I test them in the chamber again. If they are still sticky I screw the die in a fraction of a turn and resize again. I keep this process up until I find the point where the cases will chamber easily. Then I lock the locking ring down and I'm good to go...for that particular chamber. Setting your die like this will mean you never push the shoulder of the case back more than necessary. This will help avoid case head seperation if you reload the cases a lot. Of course if you are loading for several different rifles of the same caliber you need to set it to the shorter of the two chambers, or just set it all the way down to begin with and forget about it.

    Between annealing the case necks every four or five firings and resizing no more than necessary, I'm getting ten or more firings out of some of my cases. Of course an occasional trimming and maybe even turning the neck walls might be necessary from time to time as well, especially with cases that have a shallow shoulder angle.

  8. #8
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    I tried the suggestions and the problem is solved, thank you!
    pete

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