Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Which Primer Pocket Uniformer

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    301

    Default Which Primer Pocket Uniformer

    I have not been using a primer pocket uniformer, but after reading the advice of some here, it seems like a good idea. Also some of my cases have been very difficult to prime, so I am now looking for one.

    Currently I only load for my 30-06 so I only need the large rifle size, but I plan to load for both large and small rifle and pistol in the future. So far I have looked at the fallowing makes of uniformers.

    Redding Hand tool large rifle Carbide - It is not adjustable so I would need a different one for large pistol, on the up side it can not go out of adjustment. Also I would need another for small rifle. Cost $28

    Possum Hollow Carbide - This one is nice in that it includes a small cutter on the other end. However, some reviews say it is hard to adjust and does not stay adjusted. The up side is I could do every case type with it. Cost $26

    Lyman Large, it does not say so I assume not Carbide - Some reviews said the handle was junk and others said it did not stay adjusted. I would also need a second for small primers, but not for pistol. Cost $17

    Are any of these good choices? If you have an adjustable depth type does it stay adjusted, if it goes out of adjustment does it cut to deep? How impotent is carbide, I would not think it is needed for brass but I imagine that primer residue could be very hard.

    Any experience you can offer would be great.


    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    I tested others but I bought and have been using a carbide cutter made by Sinclair for years. I have cut hundreds (probably thousands) of pockets and it still works perfectly. I haven't checked the price lately, but it is a very well machined piece. If you choose the Sinclair model do not buy their handle, simply chuck the cutter in a cordless drill and have at it.

    I would not buy a cutter that is not carbide. I understand that brass is soft and regular tool steel should last a long time, but a carbide cutter is going to last you forever.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,808

    Default

    I like the Sinclair, too.
    They are carbide.
    I use the power adapters for mine.
    They're not adjustable, so you'd need another one for Large Pistol, but adjusting would be a PAIN.
    I think that carbide is important. I tried a Lyman and it got dull in a hurry. The Sinclairs are still sharp.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  4. #4
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    You definately want carbide. You can then use this cutter in uncleaned primer pockets or actually as a primer pocket cleaner and it will never get dull. The steel ones will dull quickly in the carbon residue of the fired pockets.

    You definately want one to allow the use of a driver attachment.

    The Sinclair is among the best but I would not suggest getting an adjustable one. The Rifle and Pistol in the large size are of different depth. The large uniformer can be made with an adjustable stop to allow you to set for pistol or rifle. They are not worth the extra trouble. Just buy one for large rifle and one for large pistol and mark them. Also a solid carbide cutter that is threaded to accept a screw on 1/4" hex adaptor for your little drill/driver is well worth the money.

    Redding makes all three sizes, LR, LP and SR/SP in carbide and they come with the hex driver attachment or you can buy the extra little screw driver handles to use them by hand. I bought one handle and keep my large pistol uniformer on it and put the hex adaptors on the LR and SR cutters so I can snap them in the driver when needed. I use this driver with the chamferring tool also so I bought an extra hex adapter for it also ($2).

    I have a Sinclair LR/LP adjustable cutter but never remember where it is adjusted and it is hard to set and to measure a few thousandths difference in the depth. I think it is .010" difference, but the point is I don't like it. I guess that's something else I have for sale this week....cheap!

    Sinclair has non adjustable LR and LP uniformers and they are available with adaptors or not I think but they are different. You must specify for hex driver or handle driven. I have a hand driven small rifle uniformer from them also, works fine just slow.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,145

    Default

    Ditto.
    I have Sinclair and also one of Russ Hayden's primer pocket kits. Both are excellent.
    Russ's place:

    www.shooters-supply.com
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Alaska
    Posts
    58

    Default

    30-06 cases hard to prime. Perhaps it is a crimped primer issue (military brass) RCBS and others sell a die /punch combination that removes the military crimp. Don't know if the uniformers work on this crimp issue or not. I do know that the uniformers do a nice job of making the primer pocket round and flat on the bottom. Just a thought.ire

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,808

    Default

    NorthCountry:
    I often had cases of all kinds that were "hard to prime", in this respect.

    They were hard to seat below the case head, or took some real effort. Hard to tell, hard to determine for sure.

    That's the biggest reason I use the Uniformer. After using it, the PPs are squared on the bottom and the primers seat deeper, and well below the case head. I can feel the indentation with my finger. I donít use a straight edge to make sure, any more.

    I also like it because it cleans the PPs well, on subsequent loadings too.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  8. #8
    Member Akheloce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Homer
    Posts
    1,135

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NorthCountry View Post
    30-06 cases hard to prime. Perhaps it is a crimped primer issue (military brass) RCBS and others sell a die /punch combination that removes the military crimp. Don't know if the uniformers work on this crimp issue or not. I do know that the uniformers do a nice job of making the primer pocket round and flat on the bottom. Just a thought.ire

    I wasted some money on an RCBS swage die... PITA to set up, and change between 5.56 and 7.62.

    Picked up some Redding LR, and SR uniformers from Boondocks, and it's 2 twists to remove a crimp.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •