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Thread: Best Cabin Siding for cabins

  1. #1
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Default Best Cabin Siding for cabins

    Hi All,

    What seems to be the best siding for a bush cabin? Based on up keep, cost, and the elements? Thanks.

    Ron

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Road access or not?

    Road access, the best IMHO, siding is Hardiplank cement siding. Low maintanence and pretty much fire proof.

    Off-road access I'd use metal roofing panels.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I'm going to purchase a big planer/moulder that makes 8-10 in. half round log siding to accomodare my chainsaw mill......now to find a source of lumber to feed the beast.

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Default

    Another vote for metal panels. Be sure to use the bottom drip edge.

  5. #5

    Default Metal Panels?

    Really? I agree with the low maintenance and other factors, but do you really want your wilderness cabin to be metal panel? How about log siding? Or just paint over plywood?

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    It is all about intended purpose. Metal siding goes up FAST. It does not need to be painted. It has certain fire advantages. Is pretty good in the wind if installed correctly.

    I need a place to sleep, get warm, relax, cook, have a beer etc... I do not want to have to repaint, restain, caulk, etc. Maintenance is low on my priority list.

    I will have a nice lakefront appearance. Probably the fake log look with shakes on the gable end. If someone is looking at the back 3 sides, they understand the purpose or they are trespassing.

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    I can get there by boat or helicopter. So T111 is not good?


    Ron

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    T-111 works fine. The OSB stuff that's pre-primed holds paint exceptionally well. Since you'll need to put up plywood anyway you can decide for yourself what's more efficient. T-111 works for me. If I want to cover it in the future I can do so. That's what I told myself when I built my cabin. It's been 20 years I and it hasn't been covered yet. In that time my T-111 has required a re-paint exactly once, and that was about 3 years ago. I like that maintenance schedule! On the other hand? My house used to be T-111 and now it's got siding. Different priorities rule in town.

    Metal panels are noisy. When the sun comes up and goes down the metal snaps and pops. Lean anything against it and it dents. Installation is a pain. Metal would be my last choice. But it all depends on your location. If I was building in Cold Bay, metal would become my first choice.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    My beef against plywood and T1-11 comes from porcupine country. They sure love to eat it.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  10. #10
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    My beef against plywood and T1-11 comes from porcupine country. They sure love to eat it.
    Doug,
    They even eat my pressure treated wood.
    Mike

  11. #11
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Whoa...we haven't had that before. They seem to leave all the deck lumber, posts, etc.. alone, but love the salt or whatever in the glue of plywoods. They also love the rubber on propane lines.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  12. #12

    Default siding

    I agree with Doug about the Hardi board over metal R-panels. We own a metal fab shop / metal building business and we use the Hardi products on alot of the buildings now. Less maint. than metal.

  13. #13

    Default

    A real estate agent specializing in remote Alaska recreational property told me that more than half of prospective buyers are from the lower 48. He says outside buyers are usually looking for traditional log cabins to match their idea of what an Alaskan cabin should look like.
    So log siding may be better for resale value. Using an oil-based finish looks nice and is easy to reapply every four or five years when it starts to look dry. It won't be fire resistant like Hardee Board or metal, but would still be a good product. If you're concerned about fire, a metal roof is excellent, and also, to improve your chances, keep a reasonably large clear area around the cabin as a fire break.

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    Member anonymous1's Avatar
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    Default Metal

    I used metal and am glad I did.
    I have seen several t1-11 remote seasonal cabins totally ripped apart by bears, burned up from grass fires and rotted out from blowing rain and snow. When you put up metal its already painted. It takes a little pratice cutting with a skill saw or nibbler and you always need to wear good rubber faced or leather gloves. It lasts good! Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. No popping or sweating if done right.
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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous1 View Post
    I used metal and am glad I did.
    I have seen several t1-11 remote seasonal cabins totally ripped apart by bears, burned up from grass fires and rotted out from blowing rain and snow. When you put up metal its already painted. It takes a little pratice cutting with a skill saw or nibbler and you always need to wear good rubber faced or leather gloves. It lasts good! Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. No popping or sweating if done right.

    What do you have under the metal so it doesn't pop/sweat?

    Ron

  16. #16
    Member anonymous1's Avatar
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    Default metal siding

    well on the 3 cabins I built here on Kodiak Is. I used Champion Metal over a plastic vapor barrier and lots of screws directly into 2 foot spaced purlans.
    I put double adhiesive sealing strips where the metal laps and I foam-o-filled the voids at top and bottom edges of the metal to keep out the draft. 6 inches of insulation on the inside with 3/8 cdx covered with pine paneling made a pretty tight wall.
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  17. #17

    Default always porcupine for dinner

    If you use plywood or t-111 you will never get hungry while at the cabin.
    There will be a steady stream of porkies comming to get a little piece of your house. You can hear them chewing and pop em for dinner.
    If your remote with boat and heli as your way in, how about timber, logs probably the way to go. Are you staying year around? If you got em on the property a few hundred will buy you a chainsaw mill and you can cut em for the floor and the roof. Sounds like you might already have it framed in, is that the case?

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous1 View Post
    well on the 3 cabins I built here on Kodiak Is. I used Champion Metal over a plastic vapor barrier and lots of screws directly into 2 foot spaced purlans.
    I put double adhiesive sealing strips where the metal laps and I foam-o-filled the voids at top and bottom edges of the metal to keep out the draft. 6 inches of insulation on the inside with 3/8 cdx covered with pine paneling made a pretty tight wall.
    Thanks. Just the advice I needed.

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