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Thread: Rookie IBEP test question -

  1. #1
    Member nrc's Avatar
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    Question Rookie IBEP test question -

    I read that you need a quiver in order to do the practical section of the cert / class. How many arrows does it need to hold?

    Reason I'm checking is I'll be shooting a longbow for my class at Rabbit Creek on 7/25, and I already have a side quiver that holds 3. I'd rather not buy a new hip quiver if I don't need to. (Since you only take two shots at each station I'm hoping 3 is enough - I can always have spares in the car...)

    Thanks.

    Nate
    Last edited by nrc; 06-22-2009 at 20:29. Reason: needed detail...

  2. #2

    Default ibef cert

    I did'nt use one when I did mine.
    had my arrows in my sons quiver
    and he just passed me my arrows.

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    Smile Dont Need a Quiver!

    I did my shoot last year, and I do not recall anything about needing a quiver. I think DaveintheBush can weigh in on the requirements, as I believe the changed slightly since I shot in August last year.

    However, when I shot last year, I only needed two arrows. That is two for each target. After you shot your two arrows, you went and retrieve them with the fellow to determine if they were kill shot. After that, I retrieved my 2 arrows, and went to the next target.

    The trickly part, what if you have a bad shot and you stick a tree? It may be difficult or impossible to pull an arrow out of a tree. If so, you will need another arrow. Otherwise, lack of arrows in your quiver may only slow down the shoot and cause frustration with others waiting to take their shots.

    Thats my 2 cents worth.

  4. #4
    Member blasterak's Avatar
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    I only needed two arrows when I took the IBEP course but I brought about 3 or 4 on my quiver, I removed the quiver when I shot. It is a good idea to bring extra's because there is a good chance your arrow may get whacked by someone else's arrow. When I went we had four people shooting at one target two times = 8 arrows!. I was afraid I was going to lose an arrow but luckily it never happened.

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    Default The test

    Remember, you shoot 4 targets twice, for a total of 8 shots. You must have at least one kill on each of 3 targets, and 2 kills on the 4th. That is a minimum. If you missed three shots and lost arrows, that could be a problem.
    I do not like the idea of multiple people shooting at the same target at the same time. That takes away the "hunt" aspect that the shoot is all about. I want each hunter to take the time to make their shots, then have time to discuss those shots with me. Yes, it takes more of the instructors time, and shooters must wait a bit. But all of the volunteers I have worked with agree that it is much more fair to do it this way. Quite frankly I could care less about time, and focus on keeping everything as fair as possible. Besides, I don't think a hunter needs to worry about somebody hitting his arrows.
    After the hunter shoots, I walk to the animal and we discuss the hits. Normally he knows if he did well or not. His responses are very telling, and they indicate ethics, morals, sound judgment, understanding of anatomy and responsibility. You see, I have each shooter score himself before I add any input. When a hunter walks up to a hit that is on the edge and scores himself accordingly, I take that into account. We are able to talk about shot placement, location of organs, and what he would do in the field under the same circumstances. I give him a chance to share his knowledge.
    Don't get me wrong, a shot in the gut, legs, butt, or head is a miss. I do not give away anything to make up for bad/poor shots.
    I guess it is not my goal to pass anybody. My goal is for them, through their proficiency and understanding, to pass themselves. I am there to moderate and sign the scorecard.

  6. #6
    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    Default

    You dont need a quiver, but they also dont want you walking around carrying you arrows. As i recall, if you didnt have a quiver, you just had to put them in your pocket. so if you wear a pair of carhartts that have the pockets on the sides of the legs, you got you own pair of quiver pants.

    Things sound like they have changed a bit since last summer, my two brother in laws took it earlier this spring and they were saying the same thing, that everyone would shoot at the same target. I remeber last summer having to shoot, go down there with the instructor, discuss if they were kill shots, then pull your arrows so the next guy could shoot.

  7. #7
    Member blasterak's Avatar
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    Yeah, I thought we would have one person shoot, have the instructor pass or fail him/her and go on to the next. At the course I went to, we all had to shoot at on target and than all four of us would go to the target and look it over. I took the online test and just did the field test so maybe they were pushing for time

  8. #8
    Member nrc's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks everyone for the feedback.

    I'll keep the 3-arrow quiver, and have a few spares either on the table, or in my carhartts.

    Nate

  9. #9
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default take it

    when i took mine there were people who had to share quivers because they said if you didn't have one you couldn't shoot.......3 arrows is fine.....i liked that everyone shot at once...then with four or five arrows sticking out you could see what wasn't lethal compared to what was...the shoot will have 4 targets between 10 and 30 yards...with one usually down hill...shoot twice at each target once standing once kneeling....you have to kill five times....meaning you have to kill 3 animals once and 1 animal twice...and you kill every one meaning you can't kill 1 once two twice and not kill the fourth at all......and don't forget the blood trailing.......good luck with your shoot
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  10. #10
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Nope

    Sorry guys working 4 / 10's a week and 3 hours at another job for a bit.

    There is NO requirement for a quiver. Two arrows is all you need but suggest at least three. If you have three you won't loose any. If you only have two, loosing one is almost a guarantee!

    Good luck. And BTW, you may shoot again if you do not pass on the first try. The object is to get everyone certified. We may now also coach you if we see you doing something wrong like dropping your arm after your release.

    We ran one kid through twice last time but he just could not shoot.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  11. #11
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Nate will do fine on the IBEP, I carried 2 arrows for my test.
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  12. #12
    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
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    Default

    ....thankyou, AK River Rat , and Dave in the Bush- great info, and advice- I will keep a lot of this in mind, for my classes!-
    -this really helps ...

    -I am a new IBEP instructor in Seward- hold the classes here at the house; the blood trailing and proficiency are conducted in our woods next door-
    -I've held 3 classes since the beginning of May-

    -I would recommend bringing at least 3 arrows, as well, for the aforementioned reasons...
    -also, it is nice to practice shooting with the quiver on your bow, if that is how you intend on hunting-

  13. #13
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    Default Safety Safety Safety

    It is paramount. We can not afford for somebody to get injured at a shoot. We can not have arrows flying off into the wild blue yonder due to unintentional releases.
    That is why I stress during the class, and the shoot, that all arrows must be drawn level or pointed down. If an archer "sky draws", I ask them to stop and/or let down, reiterate safety, and have them do it again.
    Some people object that I am changing style, and might affect their shot. I will stick with siding with safety regardless of that.
    I can not think of an indoor range that I have been to that I have not seen arrows sticking into the ceiling, or well above the target butts on the end wall. None of those hits were intentional.
    Imagine being out at Creamer's field, or some other fairly accessible, "congested" hunting area, and somebody lets fly an arrow tipped with razors. Not my idea of a good time, don't know about any of you.

  14. #14
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Agreed, RiverRat. If you can't draw level, you're pulling too much weight for your own good. And in the case of range shooting, the good of others as well.

    Taylor

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