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Thread: Inflatable Kayak bracing

  1. #1

    Default Inflatable Kayak bracing

    When hardshell kayaking whitewater the high brace is commonly used for regaining balance, and in return the kayaker avoids having to perform a roll. After vigorous training a kayaker can partially overturn to the point that their head is in the water, but still can easily pull their head out of the water, again avoiding a roll. Backing a high brace with a scull y stroke one can even leave their head in the water popping it out at will, etc.etc.
    Bracing a IK is different becuase of the construction designs of the different watercraft, mainly the width, and edging. Generally speaking, there are exceptions, and various levels of skill,( BUT) if most of us focus on our high brace we are usually too far on edge in an IK to pull off the brace. This common mistake is why you see lots of IK guys swimming even though their boat is more stable. More stable only means more UNSTABLE when on edge, duh!!!! so a technique fashioned to balance a per comparison unstable craft, will not work as well with a more stable craft.
    Another problem is risk of injury and the nessecity for ultra strict form when trying this brace in an IK.The shoulder strain is enormous and risk of injury is multiplied becuase of the width of an IK, which leads to the instant suprise at edge. The energy/ force required to halt the momentum of an overturning IK on edge is immense.
    The low brace has more potential (imo) for an IK and is more effective mainly becuase it can be used to enhance balance along with regaining lost balance. Since almost all IK's- cannot be rolled, a boater too far on edge is doomed/ it's over, no high brace will work, so prevention of losing balance should be the main goal.
    I usually boat class III and IV with select V and after I adjusted my brace I rarely swim, only one this year. I do use a high brace, but have had much cleaner runs after rearranging my order of operations, concerning when and how I use it.
    Try this in a pool or lake. A great drill we do in hardshells is have a kid get on the back of our kayak and try to over turn us one way or the other, by suprise. This drill develops a good high brace for hardshell kayaking, try it with an IK and see what happens. You will find when you hit edge there is no recovery.....Now change your mentality from recovery to prevention, use a low brace and prevent, the kid will have a much harder time getting you on edge and over turning you.
    Hope this helps,
    MO

  2. #2

    Default Pro and Con IK thread

    Sorry guys, I meant to post this on that thread. Just something I have noticed and worked on, and it seems to work better for me.

  3. #3
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    Thumbs up Good post & Good points

    Ahead of all the self-bailing sit-on-tops like AIRE Lynx... Metzeller had the Spezi and Spezi L.

    The old I-beam Metzeller design was traditional shaped from the sense that it was 'decked' w/ a small cockpit seat much like a hard shell. These boats had good primary and secondary stability (not nearly as forgiving as today's Lynx) nevertheless, had reduced recovery characteristics once over a bit too far or attempting complete roles.

    The reasons for this tho' are much the same as the majority of today's self-bailing designs.

    Yes... there is that lack of edginess or predictability on edge w/ most IKs... on the other hand, it is actually the extra buoyancy of the side tubes (same quality that allow forgiveness and stability) that upsets an IK paddler's recovery as an end-result of continuous (but irregular) up-lifting.

  4. #4

    Default Incept K30X/Sally

    Brian or others, what do you know about this boat? From the side it looks like my mega rocker, just alittle longer and much lighter.
    I wonder if one would be better off just to hardshell kayak, the packability would be there, but I cannot see other advantages. However,this IK does seem as close as it gets to a hard boat.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by markoathout View Post
    Brian or others, what do you know about this boat? From the side it looks like my mega rocker, just alittle longer and much lighter.
    I wonder if one would be better off just to hardshell kayak, the packability would be there, but I cannot see other advantages. However,this IK does seem as close as it gets to a hard boat.
    I'll go out on a limb here to say that I do not think much of the Incept Sally. Not totally fair to say for certain… yet stats are not as convincing as the great paddling on the promotional side.

    Some will recollect... I took this stance on the NRS "Gig-Bob" before it hit the showrooms and determining pretty darn well by design that it was a highly detailed, overpriced crapper when it hit internet marketing publicity. It plainly does not hold to the fundamentals that a reliable high-pressure inflatable drop-stitch anything must be over built and heavily constructed vs. morphing it into convenient lightweight/pack-ability. If you research or examine the base cloth, matrix, and coating it will reveal all hype and exhibit very slim evidence of any durability or excellence.

    Incept has a good reputation in some ways, and has been reasonably innovative over the years. Tho' Incept boats do make the grade maintaining a convincingly high degree to detail... the higher prices do not reflect their line-up in terms of durability and value. I like some Incept products, but only to an extent.

    The base cloth on the Sally ("Manufactured using only the finest quality fabrics containing 1100 dtex woven polyester base cloth") is a base cloth more akin to PVC coated sales/marketing banner ads at sporting venues... So this leaves the coating or 2-sided coatings to the base cloth a bit undisclosed wouldn't you say? Why? With Incept it's been traditionally a plastomer. So what is it? PVC? Urethane? Why is it so light? Too light a base cloth? A little too little coating? or Both? How are they achieving more stiffness/rigidity? Designing/constructing a higher pressure system might be one example, but at what expense and how about making a field repair. How strong is Alaska field tough vs. too light/compact and not reliable enough?

    Where I am going with this is to say that paddling Sally may not be much of a progression out in the real world. Would I prefer to see it and use it to defend my stance or re-evaluate with some practical hands on? 100% for sure!

    - For now I won't be holdin' my...

  6. #6
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    Default Polyurethane Alloy

    Figured it was worth mentioning and forgot in above posting that this is one of the formulas for fabrication materials Incept uses... This can be anything from pvc/urethane combos and even a urethane/rubber (natural or synthetic) combination formulations bonded to a base cloth.

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