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Thread: I caught a big one.

  1. #1
    Member trapperbob's Avatar
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    Default I caught a big one.

    I caught this pacific sleeper shark in the sound last friday, the biggest fish I have ever landed. Estimated between 10 to 12 feet and 500 to 700 pounds. To be fair about the story the second hook on my set up stuck through the anchor line when the fish was 20' to 30' down. We cut it loose after a couple pictures.




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    Member Tolman24's Avatar
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    Nice fish. That is a big one.

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    Member trapperbob's Avatar
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    Default Couple But from the same outing



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    Thumbs up Wow! Nice Catch!!!

    Haven't shark fished in PWS yet... mostly out in skiffs and kayaks --- lol

    - that shark is huge!!

    - wonder what it would taste like? --- lol

    Were you trolling, jigging or soaking?

    Way Cool Shark! I'm a bit jealous - Were you targeting Shark at the time?

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    That is awesome!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    We've caught up to 100 of those in a day while longlining for sablefish out in the sound in 2,000' of water. Something has changed out there. My parents have been fishing the Sound since the mid-70s and did not catch a single one of those until 1988. They caught two that year, and no more until the early 90's. Now we only catch ~30 on a regular day, but if we leave our gear down very long they will absolutely devestate the fish that are on the line. Something shifted in the food supply or currents that brought the sleeper sharks into the Sound in serious numbers.

  7. #7

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    Are sleeper sharks that common? We're not confusing them with salmon sharks are we. The pics look like a sleeper to me. Catch a hundred in a day, really? Cool pics.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OATS View Post
    Are sleeper sharks that common? We're not confusing them with salmon sharks are we. The pics look like a sleeper to me. Catch a hundred in a day, really? Cool pics.
    Yes, really. We haven't had any 100 shark days in the past four or five years, but we'll still catch 30 in an average day...sometimes more. We've only caught one salmon shark ever - we're longlining in 2,000' of water, and salmon sharks are surface feeders.

    I'm going out to fill my sablefish permit fairly soon. I'll post an update with our shark numbers when we get back.

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    Member sevenmag's Avatar
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    fantastic pics trapperbob^^ thank you for sharing.
    sevenmag

  10. #10
    Member trapperbob's Avatar
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    Default This shark was caught @ 90'

    I was soaking bait on halibut gear with a circle hook at 90 feet. Brian do you care to guess at size. I don't claim to be a good judge.

  11. #11

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    i have hooked a lot of them soaking bait at around a hundred fathoms out of whittier. it seems that when they first bite they swim up with the bait. my line goes slack right away, and you reel up to feel a big fish on your line. you hope it's a giant halibut but its not. after a couple of minutes my line just goes slack 90% of the time. this is because they roll on the line and their skin rubs right through the spiderwire with all the strain of them on the rod. can be frustrating in lost gear and time.

  12. #12

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    Very Cool!
    I have been wanting to catch one for a longtime, but never have, in SE. Thanks for sharing!

  13. #13

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    Thanks for the clear up on that Brian. Totally different world down at 2000'.....thats really down there. Had no clue there are that many of those guys out there.

  14. #14
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Nice fish, Bob! Bet your kids were impressed with ole Dad! They sure aren't very pretty.

    Pete
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Question This thread is really cool!!!

    What do you do w/ this kind of shark?

    - catch & release only?

    - are they good to eat?

    - If I'm sitting there in my Cat or kayak... do I put the bait right on or a bit above the bottom like Hali fishing?

    When these sharks are around are they an indicator of something else down there good to catch for our more typical take off the food chain?

    - Could a catch/release be dangerous and difficult scenario to be avoided when in a large inflatable?

    This thread is really cool!!!

  16. #16
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    As for eating, I'm going to guess no. There is a very similar shark in the Atlantic called the Greenland shark. According to a National Geographic article I read a few years ago, natives from Greenland will feed the shark to their dog teams, but only after soaking the meat in the ocean for 48 hours. Prior to the soaking, the meat has a toxic (but not lethal) effect on the dogs. I don't know the details, but that doesn't sound like something I want to eat. We kept the first two we ever caught and tried to find a buyer for them - no luck. When you cut them open, their meat looks almost exactly like fat tissue - very soft and spongy - not at all like other shark meat I've seen before.

    They're quite docile at the surface, so I don't think catch and release would be too much of a problem. They have very small teeth, but I wouldn't recommend trying to recover your hook unless you've got some very long pliers. We had a less-than-intelligent crewmember stick his hand right into the mouth of one of these sharks one time. A few screams and bandages later, he decided that wasn't such a good idea.

    As for if they're an indicator of other fish, all I can say is that we catch them most often on black cod (sablefish). They'll try to eat the fish that's already on the line and then get hooked themselves.



    Bob - I'm not a very good judge on their size, either. I've never strung one up on a scale, but our guesses are right around what you guessed. We've caught a few that have to be pushing the upper hundreds to almost a thousand, but I think most are in the 300-500 pound range. Just a guess, though.

  17. #17
    Member trapperbob's Avatar
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    Default Another the next day

    The next day less than a 1/4 mile away, I believe we had another one take the bait four times but apparently we were not able to get the hook stuck in. Of course I don't know what it was but it felt equally as large. It would pull very hard uptide for 5 to 8 seconds and then let go ???? I will fish there again so we will see. A lot of salmon on my finder the whole time we were fishing.

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