Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Bear hunting "ala' 1916

  1. #1

  2. #2
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Thumbs up Peninsula storms...

    Interesting read, wantj...
    With the wonderful equipment we all have today, it is hard to imagine how rough and tough those early hunts were. (And on TV, "celebrity hunters" talk about a tough, hard two day hunt in a Texas high stand!)

    I believe you have been there, down the AK Peninsula that far. Probably many, many times.

    I have only spent four spring bear seasons in that area, out that far, with AAA Alaskan, Rich G, and on personal excursions...
    The storms are amazing. The wind blows so hard that water blows out of Cold Bay and up onto the tundra. The horizontal rain blows so hard that rain drops are driven painfullly into any exposed skin. Little mountainside waterfalls blow up into the air, not down. Great storms.

    Wantj, did you hear about the time Roger M (AAA Alaskan) flipped in Cold Bay (1995?). Almost no Roger, no more. He lived because one of his assistants, a very able seaman, came back 2 1/2 miles in 12"+ seas to rescue his cold and nearly "gone and done" self.

    The end of the Alaska Peninsula...The Mother Of All Storms...rugged, unforgiving, actively hostile country. Beautiful!

    And the bears...the area of my sole B&C brown bear kill.

    Dennis
    AKTAGS

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    I read all the old books of that time I can find and I'm glad we have better bullets today. Hunting trips back then were for sure trips and time ment little.

  4. #4
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Talking 12"?

    Correction...When Rogers assistant came back to get em in Cold Bay, to save him, the swells were bigger than 12 inches...more like 12 foot white-caps. Very grave weather conditions with terribly dangerous seas....small typo...opps.....DB/AKTAGS

    Anyway...today, that country is the end-of-the-earth. In 1916 it must have been far past the end-of-the-earth.

    Old time stories from the "good old days", or more recent...bear tales in the King Cove/Cold Bay area are gonna be thrilling.

  5. #5

    Smile just plain tough son-of -a guns..

    What a man. Went to sea as a young man, jumped ship in Hawaii, took a steamer from Seattle to Alaska. Hunted polar bears on the sly in Russian territory, married native, established a major hunting opertion on Kodiak Island with a big boat and filmed it and toured the lower "48" to promote it early in the 20th century. Some how he managed to survive all this while carrying a 30-06 for those big bears and the bullets weren't as good as what we have now. The mold is broke. He enjoyed a freedom that will never return.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1,131

    Red face

    Very exciting hunting back then. I was struck by the number of shots fired with the bullets having no effect. The .45 70 government was I think long since developed by then with 500 grain bullets. I think this would have worked better for bears but thats just me. Guys were brave back then......
    I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. Fred Bear

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    Interesting read, wantj...
    With the wonderful equipment we all have today, it is hard to imagine how rough and tough those early hunts were. (And on TV, "celebrity hunters" talk about a tough, hard two day hunt in a Texas high stand!)

    I believe you have been there, down the AK Peninsula that far. Probably many, many times.

    I have only spent four spring bear seasons in that area, out that far, with AAA Alaskan, Rich G, and on personal excursions...
    The storms are amazing. The wind blows so hard that water blows out of Cold Bay and up onto the tundra. The horizontal rain blows so hard that rain drops are driven painfullly into any exposed skin. Little mountainside waterfalls blow up into the air, not down. Great storms.

    Wantj, did you hear about the time Roger M (AAA Alaskan) flipped in Cold Bay (1995?). Almost no Roger, no more. He lived because one of his assistants, a very able seaman, came back 2 1/2 miles in 12"+ seas to rescue his cold and nearly "gone and done" self.

    The end of the Alaska Peninsula...The Mother Of All Storms...rugged, unforgiving, actively hostile country. Beautiful!

    And the bears...the area of my sole B&C brown bear kill.

    Dennis
    AKTAGS
    Only hunted the Peninsula once in the mid sixties. Spent all of our bear "time" on Kodiak. It is very interesting to see how guiding has evolved as experience has been gained and pasted on both from the hunting and guiding standpoint (at least with some segments of the industry ).
    Joe (Ak)

  8. #8
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Didn't he use a Savage 99 in 300 Savage when he started in Alaska

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •