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Thread: Day Pack?

  1. #1
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default Day Pack?

    Tried to do some searching in the archives but didn't have much luck. What do you use for a day pack for a moose or bear hunt? I have a cabelas frame for pack out quarters but it just doesn't seen to make much sense to put it together with the bag for day pack, too big and to much weight, bulk??? Am I looking at this the wrong way. I had bought a newer military style pack but the weight is waaay to much!! What works for you? Size, brand, required features, ect? Any thoughts would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    It seems that the Badlands and Eberlestock packs rule the hunting day pack scene. I went with eberlestock's x-1 bag for the included rifle scabard. The Badlands batwing design is pretty sweet though. Both packs are tough.

  3. #3
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    look at black creek alaskan or canadian packs as well

  4. #4
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    I have a $65 backpack from Samís Club, light, and waterproof. The items you put in the pack are more important than the day pack.

  5. #5
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    I use this one - Kelty Grizzly

  6. #6

    Default cilogear

    The 45L work pack is pretty awesome. They are made in Portland Ore not in China. They are extremely light and expand enough to carry a load the suspension will carry a load as well.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  7. #7

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    There are some great daypacks available by quite a few companies. Of of the negatives to a daypack is not being able to pack out much meat on the first trip out. If you aren't far and it is fairly easy terrain it may not matter as much as if you need to return several miles in ungodly terrain! For scouting, a daypack works great or for short hikes not far from a boat, camp, or vehicle!

    I have a couple Badlands daypacks that I have used and abused over the years. They have great zippers and pockets. I use an entirely different Arcteryx mountaineering pack for hauling out camp plus meat. For meat hauling I would think you will need something larger than 4500 but for a daypack 2200-4,000 ought to work fine.

    I am in the market for another hunting daypack and have been shopping around. It's too bad that some of the hunting backpack manufactures haven't picked up more ideas from the mountaineering world....super light weight, quick drying, updated padding, etc. Sitka finally figured this out w/hunting clothes and is making a mint!

    Obviously you may want to look at your gear to figure out which daypack may work. If you carry a tripod plus spotting scope you may want larger outside pockets or pouch that will give you quick, easy access but keep it covered when it is rainy or muddy? It is also nice having some sort of pouch and straps on the side where you can secure your rifle so your hands are free for climbing? I also like lots of small pocket for quick access to maps, waterbottles, knife, flashlight, etc. Another nice feature is full length or frontal access to your entire pack so you don't have to unload all your gear to reach something in the bottom. I do quite a bit of antler shed hunting and it is nice to have lots of straps to attach antlers, jacket, and other things to the outside.

  8. #8

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    Check out the Mystery Ranch NICE with crew cab. This is a do everything pack. Opens up to pack quarters and gets small enough for a great day pack. Expensive but hands down better then the badlands gear.

  9. #9

    Default Backpack Weight?

    I really don't like to bash gear, but one thing you may want to do is research how much the daypack/pack you have in mind weighs? I have heard nothing but good things about Mystery Ranch and Eberlestock packs, but boy are most of them heavy! Sometimes it may be worth the additional weight if ithe pack is made of excellent materials and craftsomanship so there may be a trade-off! If you have a chance, take a look at the pack and try it on with a load before making a decision! I went to the Mystery Ranch website and the "Nice" pack mentioned above is only 1900 cu in and weighs 8 lbs 1 oz...holy smokes that is heavy for a pack that size?

  10. #10
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    Default daypack

    I have spent way, way too much money on small packs that haven't done what I needed/wanted. Have been looking towards the eberlestock/badlands style packs for a while, but just can't bring myself to drop the coin. Guess I'm a little gun shy.

    Personally, I hunt in my 2000 model year Barneys frame with the second version of cabelas bag. Finally wore the bag out after 15 years... generally I hunt on the run, packing camp with me as I go until I find what I'm looking for. Wouldn't recommend this for Moose for obvious reasons, but I have been known to pack a forky 8 miles to the truck. Not saying I'm the sharpest tool in the shed...

    Meat and everything goes in the bag, I don't take it off except to wash it after I've made it dirty. Tape the pins & clips so they're quiet and away you go. It's always been on the small side at 4000ci, but it's forced me to not carry too much crap. Can be a good thing. Frame & bag weigh just over 8 pounds. "Must haves" + pack weight = 28 pounds. That is including 100oz of water. Only thing that changes my pack weight on the way in is food. On the way out, if all goes well I'm one pooped pup & headed back for more!

    If I was hunting from a boat, bike or airplane.... I'd have a day pack and leave the freighter at camp. Too broke to have toys or rent some time in one, so I hoof it. No room for a daypack when you're already carrying your life on your back.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimss View Post
    I really don't like to bash gear, but one thing you may want to do is research how much the daypack/pack you have in mind weighs? I have heard nothing but good things about Mystery Ranch and Eberlestock packs, but boy are most of them heavy! Sometimes it may be worth the additional weight if ithe pack is made of excellent materials and craftsomanship so there may be a trade-off! If you have a chance, take a look at the pack and try it on with a load before making a decision! I went to the Mystery Ranch website and the "Nice" pack mentioned above is only 1900 cu in and weighs 8 lbs 1 oz...holy smokes that is heavy for a pack that size?
    It's 1900 to 5000. It can go even larger with the additional purchase of the lid and load cells. My friend is a hunting guide here in AK and in MT. His first pack was a badlands and it was destroyed on the first hunt. Broken zippers, stitching and buckles. Switched to the Mystery Ranch and have had no problems since. What he likes about the pack is the way it functions as a day pack (can break down for a carry-on on the plane) and also put an entire moose quarter in it. Yes expensive but worth it. The company has been around and the owner was the original owner of Dana Design packs. Sold to K2 and started mystery ranch. Two other friends were set on a Barnies Pack but after seeing the versatility and trying the Nice Frame with Crew Cab Pack on ended up purchasing the Mystery Ranch.

  12. #12

    Default Pack Weight!

    The daypack/pack conversion is a great idea although I still think 8+ lbs is an incredibly heavy pack! Most large 5,000+ cu in mountaineering packs weigh 6 to 7 lbs and are designed to carry 50 to 80+ lb loads and 4,000ish cu in packs are usually in the 4 to 5 lb range. Maybe Mystery Ranch is worth the $ and weight? Hopefully some of the hunting pack companies catch on and look into developing lighter packs! Up-to-date, super tough, waterproof, and light weight materials are available! Mountaineer guys risk their lives packing up Mt Everst and other treacherous mountains so they must work pretty well? I know I would be the first in line to buy a Mystery Ranch if they came out with a 6 to 7 lb version that is 5,000+ cu in...they are a fantastic company!

  13. #13
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Something I started doing a few years back...I have my Barney's pack that I leave in camp or on a boat. I have a nice Camelback day pack that is made for Snow Boarders that holds plenty of water, emergency supplies, small amount of food, and game bags. I can lay out my space blanket to put meat on if needed. When hunting the Sag, I always keep this smaller bag with me at all times as you *never know* what is going to happen around the next bend. It works great! I would not want to haul meat with it, but it will keep you alive if needed in an emergency
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  14. #14

    Default Pack weight

    "The daypack/pack conversion is a great idea although I still think 8+ lbs is an incredibly heavy pack! Most large 5,000+ cu in mountaineering packs weigh 6 to 7 lbs and are designed to carry 50 to 80+ lb loads and 4,000ish cu in packs are usually in the 4 to 5 lb range."

    I think that is where most, not all, of the difference is. A mountaineering 5000+ cu in pack 6-7 lb and rated for a 50-80lb load vs a hunting 5000+pack 8lb and designed to carry well over 100lb loads

  15. #15
    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimss View Post
    The daypack/pack conversion is a great idea although I still think 8+ lbs is an incredibly heavy pack! Most large 5,000+ cu in mountaineering packs weigh 6 to 7 lbs and are designed to carry 50 to 80+ lb loads and 4,000ish cu in packs are usually in the 4 to 5 lb range. Maybe Mystery Ranch is worth the $ and weight? Hopefully some of the hunting pack companies catch on and look into developing lighter packs! Up-to-date, super tough, waterproof, and light weight materials are available! Mountaineer guys risk their lives packing up Mt Everst and other treacherous mountains so they must work pretty well? I know I would be the first in line to buy a Mystery Ranch if they came out with a 6 to 7 lb version that is 5,000+ cu in...they are a fantastic company!
    Hunting is not mountaineering. The crew cab isn't designed to haul 50 to 80 pounds of warm clothes and freeze dried food. The crew cab is designed to haul from 0 pounds to 180 pounds of whatever the hell you put in it. Meat, horns, knifes, sticks, rafts, clothes, rocks, concrete blocks, guns, babies, aircraft tires, firewood, and god knows what else. Its designed to haul seriously messed up loads in the worst possible terrain and weather and be as comfortable as possible for the user. Mountaineering packs have a whole nother design function and use.

    Bottom line, if you are worried about those couple extra pounds maybe Hunting just isn't for you. I'll take the extra weight for a crewcab any day because i know for a fact it will go to hell and back with 2.5 blacktails all boned up on the inside in the pouring down sideways rain, with my gun gypsy rigged to the back while I beat through devils club and alder patches and slide down mountain slopes in the mud and skunk cabbage and fog trying to find some flagging that doesn't exist anymore, and when I finally get back to the truck, my shoulders will feel good, my hips good, my back good and the pack will be begging to do it again tomorrow.

    You want to see jealousy, go hunting with someone that has a crewcab. I've never been more jealous in my life.

  16. #16
    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    I have been search and reading reviews on packs for quite some time now too, I want a day pack that i can fit everything in and be able to strap my bow too. I think that i am going to go with the Badlands 2200 because of its internal frame design and the pull out meat cover.

  17. #17

    Default Wow!

    All I can say is WOW! Just thought I would point out how heavy some of the current hunting packs are and that there are other options! If you want to compare oranges to apples....I wouldn't call crampons, ice axes, slings, helmets, belay devices, wired nuts, wall hammers, piton, hooks, cams, rope, etc..plus all the gear to stay alive in blizzard conditions for several days much different than a lot of stuff we carry hunting? As we all know mountaineers are granola toting whimps compared to us hunters! No need to be concerned about 2 extra lbs on a hunters back!

  18. #18
    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimss View Post
    All I can say is WOW! Just thought I would point out how heavy some of the current hunting packs are and that there are other options! If you want to compare oranges to apples....I wouldn't call crampons, ice axes, slings, helmets, belay devices, wired nuts, wall hammers, piton, hooks, cams, rope, etc..plus all the gear to stay alive in blizzard conditions for several days much different than a lot of stuff we carry hunting? As we all know mountaineers are granola toting whimps compared to us hunters! No need to be concerned about 2 extra lbs on a hunters back!
    You just made my point. "apples to oranges" . hunting packs to mountaineering packs. Different environments, different tasks, different loads. I never said anything about the manliness or the diet of mountaineers.. so Im not sure where you inferred that..?

    My point is I've never seen a mountaineer packing loads as heavy as or as awkward as a hunter. Nor have I seen many hunters at crazy elevations with crampons sitting out a blizzard.

    MY .02. You don't need to be worried about that two pounds. Its been said before on this forum and others. They only people you see complaining about the weight of a MR are people who don't own one. The people who own them and use them.. don't complain about the weight.

    Im all for ultralight gear, but this is one spot where it does not concern me.

  19. #19

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    I guess I am still a little bewildered in regard to mountaineering vs hunting. In both instances there "can" be heavy-awkward, heavy loads involved. 2 lbs is 2 lbs and if you are like me and other hunters, mountaineers, or whatever you are constantly searching for ways to drop ounces off your load. 2 additional lbs is actually quite a bit of weight on anyones back...especially when hauling freight up giant canyons or trying to cover miles each day. Obviously there are trade-offs between confirt, weight, durability, etc for the particular task at hand. I have no doubts Mystery Ranch (and other hunting pack companies) are an awesome pack and design but all I am saying is with all the current hi-tech materials available today it would be great if some of the hunting pack companies came out with lighter weight packs....the mountaineering and ultra-light backpack companies sure have!

    I know there is a time and place for a particular piece of gear/clothing but if you are given the option of wearing a heavy pair of wool pants or a mountaineer pant (such as Mamut Champs, etc) for climbing a hill which one would you grab? Sitka is a company that is making a fortune off hunters since they picked up the idea of manufacturing lighter camo hunting clothes that are super durable, light, and functional that are based off mountaineering clothes principles.

    The same thing can be said about packs but it seems like no company has steeped up to the plate yet! There is always room for improvement just as you can usually find a way of taking a few ounces out of your pack! A 8 to 10 lb pack seems like an easy thing to shed some weight when there are super packs available that weigh 6 to 8 lbs! If you are happy with your Mystery Ranch...great..but if Mystery Ranch came out with a similar pack that was 2 lbs lighter I know there would be a lot of guys standing in line to get them....just as guys are frothing at the mouth to get a hold of some of the new Sitka hunting clothes line! I am certainly eager to see what new gear is available in the coming years to shed a few ounces off my back!

  20. #20

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    Jimss,

    I see your point about the weight and using materials like the mountaineering packs do. I haven't spoke with the guys at MR but I know Dana (the owner) built high quality mountaineering packs when he owned Dana Designs and that was his focus there. What I'm getting at is there must be a reason he isn't making the pack lighter because he has that knowledge. Could be durability, strength, or some other reason. I do know there is no comparison between Badlands and MR. The crew cab was actually designed for special forces military use and the pack is built to hold 3 50 cal ammo cans. My guide friend lives in Bozeman and is in and out of the shop oftern. I'll have him ask the guys at the factory and see what response they give. It's a good question. Lighter is always better but like said before I'm not going to sweat 2lbs. The durability and versatility make up for it. All things equal and 2lbs lighter I'm going to take the lighter pack. Again all things equal.

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