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Thread: Smoking bellies in a little chief?

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    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    Default Smoking bellies in a little chief?

    I'm smoking some reds. It's the first experience with a smoker and fish. I want to make some squaw candy buy I don't want to ruin good fish. Anyone have any suggestions for making squaw candy for a first timer?

    Thanks
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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Keep your brine and overall process simple. I like a gallon of apple juice, 1 cup sea salt and 1 cup sugar. Make shure you let the fish fully dry after soaking in the brine and take your time.
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    Default even simpler

    I use as just as much salt as the water will absorb while heated, then some will solidify as it cools but that's fine; tells you you're at its solubility level exactly (can't salt it any more; it'd just sink to the bottom). Some say "when a potato floats that's enough salt", but I don't use that method.

    Then one cup white sugar per gallon and let cool to room temp.

    Soak fish for 30 minutes (or 45 if you like it really salty), dry off. A little salt/pepper if you want.

    Smoke it using apple (or alder if they're out of apple) and lots of it, until your instant-read digital thermometer shows the thickest part is just barely done. I forget the exact temp.; its not much; like 120 or thereabouts. (Ask me again when I get some salmon here )

    Pull each one individually when done, checking every 5 minutes sometimes, but soon you'll judge them based on color instead of sticking each one.

    Some people play with adding some brown sugar on top of the fish when close to done, with excellent results, but its stickier to eat.

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    Brown Sugar and salt, mix about 70&#37; sugar and 30% salt. rub the fillets down with the dry mix, place flesh down in a bowl and cover and put in the fridge over night. The salt draws out moisture and make a liquid brine, wash the fillets of and let them air dry for an hour or two then stuff them in the smoker with alder chips.

    I have tried many different brines an methods for my smoked salmon i have found that the simpiler, the better when it comes to a brine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by B-radford View Post
    Brown Sugar and salt, mix about 70% sugar and 30% salt. rub the fillets down with the dry mix, place flesh down in a bowl and cover and put in the fridge over night. The salt draws out moisture and make a liquid brine, wash the fillets of and let them air dry for an hour or two then stuff them in the smoker with alder chips.

    I have tried many different brines an methods for my smoked salmon i have found that the simpiler, the better when it comes to a brine.
    +1

    I use 1 part salt, either kosher or pickling, and 2 parts brown sugar as a dry rub. Osmosis pulls the salt and sugar into the meat. Take a pan or other flat dish with sides on it and put the dry rub into it. Fluff with a fork. Then drop your salmon into the mixture meat side down, what ever sticks is enough to brine your meat. Place meat in layers in a caserole dish, meat to meat and skin to skin. Let the brine sit for at least 4 hours and 12 is better. You will see liquid in the dish which is being pulled out of the fish and replaced with the brine. Once you finish the brine, rinse the meat and let it air dry, this is the most important part in making good looking smoked salmon.
    I have a big chief and I only use 1 pan of wood chips per batch and smoke for 6-12 hours depending on meat thickness and outdoor temperatures. Apple wood is my prefered wood of choice for smoking.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    Quote Originally Posted by garnede View Post
    +1

    I use 1 part salt, either kosher or pickling, and 2 parts brown sugar as a dry rub. Osmosis pulls the salt and sugar into the meat. Take a pan or other flat dish with sides on it and put the dry rub into it. Fluff with a fork. Then drop your salmon into the mixture meat side down, what ever sticks is enough to brine your meat. Place meat in layers in a caserole dish, meat to meat and skin to skin. Let the brine sit for at least 4 hours and 12 is better. You will see liquid in the dish which is being pulled out of the fish and replaced with the brine. Once you finish the brine, rinse the meat and let it air dry, this is the most important part in making good looking smoked salmon.
    I have a big chief and I only use 1 pan of wood chips per batch and smoke for 6-12 hours depending on meat thickness and outdoor temperatures. Apple wood is my prefered wood of choice for smoking.
    Are you doing this with fillets, sections of fillets, or using strips of salmon? I'm going to give it a try, but I smoke strips, usually less than 1" in cross-section either way. I'm wondering if these would be better on the lower end of brine time, i.e. 4-6 hours?

    .
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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickster View Post
    Are you doing this with fillets, sections of fillets, or using strips of salmon? I'm going to give it a try, but I smoke strips, usually less than 1" in cross-section either way. I'm wondering if these would be better on the lower end of brine time, i.e. 4-6 hours?

    .
    I do this with both strips and filets. I usually brine them together. The strips soak more brine in than the filets do (more surface area to volume of meat). 4-6 hours will do you good with strips.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    This is the exact process I use, I always have had great results, scroll down and just follow the steps and it will come out great.

    I usually brine it over night, so its in ther more than 6 hours.


    http://www.salmonuniversity.com/rs_htss01_index.html

  9. #9

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    Thanks, B-radford! That's a very nice website and description with pictures. It really is a simple process, but having not done the dry "brine" before, it's nice to have it so thoroughly laid out. I can already taste the fresh-smoked salmon coming my way!
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

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    B-rad, I appreciate the link. There are some good tidbits in there.
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

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    Keep in mind that while the mentioned process is delicous it is a kippered fish recipe and not a salmon strip(jerky style) recipe.
    pete

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    Quote Originally Posted by pak View Post
    Keep in mind that while the mentioned process is delicous it is a kippered fish recipe and not a salmon strip(jerky style) recipe.
    pete
    Yeah, I meant "strips" as in kippered or hot smoked, not jerky...good point.
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

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    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    For jerky style strips, I use the recipies on the AOJ:

    http://www.alaskaoutdoorjournal.com/...oosejerky.html

    I use this for both moose and salmon, it turns out great. Let them brine over night and then I usually only put one pan of chips on them and then let them cook nice and slow till their done. I also do Mosse jerky with the added liquid smoke because i usually do my moose jerkey in the winter months when it is to cold out to smoke.

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