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Thread: The Feeling

  1. #1
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    Default The Feeling

    I've been fishing with Roe on the bottom of the river now for 2 seasons, and I can feel the Bites but for some reason I cannot hook on to one and reel it in, Am I slow on the pull or is it just not my luck. Some days it will be a little pull and yesterday was a big pull but nothing in the freezer yet! I guess the question that I have is what does it feel like to hook one or what kind of pull should I expect? Any info would be much appreicated!

  2. #2
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    Okay, I am not sure were you are fishing kings at Bigbertha but what I have found in most places is that it is better to wait than to set the hook to soon. Kings will take it and if you wait a few seconds they will turn with the bait and pretty much hook themselves. Still set the hook at this point but be careful if the king has a full head of steam going away from you how hard to lay the wood to them or something will give. Line, rod, or the hook will just pull out but something bad will happen.
    Fishing the Little Su I always had better luck with a moving set up. Bounce your presentation through the hole (drift it with the current) unless you are using a plug, spinner, spoon, wiggle wart type of lure then work it like normal.
    I noticed back in the day that on the Deshka (when bait is legal) down buy the mouth in that slow water that they barely bite and will let it go if you do not hit them when you feel them. Almost feels like a trout bite there. But if you go upstream a few miles they will take it if you let them so wait,wait,wait..get em.
    You will know when you get a drive by from a king as there will no mistaking the power that you will feel from them.
    On another note use a single hook or a if you are allowed to use multiple hooks use two single hooks with the second one acting as a trailer with the bait attached to the first hook via a eggloop knot. Never ever use a treble hook with roe if at all possible.
    Hopes this helps a little and good luck BigBertha.
    Last edited by iceblue; 06-09-2009 at 20:29. Reason: added word

  3. #3
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    Default

    So in other words I should let the pole go until I know for sure the King is running or are we talking on the 2nd or 3rd bend pull back?

  4. #4
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    What happens is that the when the king takes your bait and turns away from you your rod will double over and line will be coming off of the reel. This is what you are waiting for. If the fish takes your bait and comes at you then that is another story and you will need to catch up to it (reel fast) and when you feel the weight of the fish then you set the hook. Still, you want to give the king a chance to take the bait and like I said before it is better to wait than it is to set the hook to soon.
    I have seen kings nibble, nibble, nothing for seconds, nibble, nibble, nothing, and then whammo off it goes like a rocket. Got one the other day that this went on for up to thirty seconds and we were just running plugs without bait but it still did not take it right away. My advice is when you get hit say one king salmon, two king salmon, three king salmon and then set the hook or try to wait at least three seconds before moving the rod. But once you start to move the rod there is no turning back. Just try to make sure the fish has it before you hit em.

  5. #5
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    Default Set the hook

    There are many different opinions. One of the best guides on the river says he sets the hook the very first time he feels the fish. I usually wait for the second tug unless the first tug almost takes the rod out of my hand. By waiting for the second tug, I know for sure the fish is there and I am more ready to set the hook. Usually I have also dropped my rod tip "feeding the fish" allowing the fish to take the bait w/o feeling the weight of the cannonball, and giving me a good range of motion to set the hook. I keep my thumb on the spool the first time I set the hook. Many people will tell you this is not correct and it might not be, but it works for me. I know when these fish are fresh from the ocean they have very hard mouths. They are not trout or catfish and you will not rip their lips off. Hit them as hard as you can. Depending on what the fish does, if I can, I will then set the hook again, this time without my thumb on the spool. This lets me confirm my hook set as well as check the drag. The fun has now begun.

  6. #6
    Member Zissou's Avatar
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    Default

    I caught my first king at ship creek last year, when the tide came in and made flippin' impossible. So I got lazy and left my rig at the bottom of the river and sat down, I was maybe 50ft downstream of the dam cable.

    The line was tight, and the current of the river pulled on it just enough to give the rod some tension. After a few minutes, the tip begin to tap, and in a panicky sort of way, I did want anyone might do; I set the hook. And there was nothing.

    So I begin to think it was my imagination, reeled it in and reset it. Moments later, there was that tapping again, but this time I decided to watch. It began for a moment and then it stopped. It would wiggle, tap some more, stop for a moment, and then wiggle a bit again. It was so slight, I pointed it out to a girl that was sitting next to me, and she said it was nothing. I started to think it was a small smolt or fish pecking at my rig. Then, very quickly, the rod and line went completely slack. I was like and then realized that the only thing that made sense was that a fish had taken it off the bottom, sinker and all. WHAM! I set the hook and pulled in my first king, which turned out to be 27lbs. I was ecstatic.

    Since then I've been a believer in just being patient. Make sure that fish has a hold, whether it's a steady bend or hard pull, before you set the hook prematurely and spook it.

    I remember another time where I was sight fishing for Kings less than fifteen feet away in a clear river, and I could never feel the take, even after hooking several fish. My only hint was that my line would stop and I couldn't see the lure anymore. Set the hook, bam, King. They're really gentle sometimes.

  7. #7
    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Default Spot On...

    Quote Originally Posted by iceblue View Post
    What happens is that the when the king takes your bait and turns away from you your rod will double over and line will be coming off of the reel. This is what you are waiting for. If the fish takes your bait and comes at you then that is another story and you will need to catch up to it (reel fast) and when you feel the weight of the fish then you set the hook. Still, you want to give the king a chance to take the bait and like I said before it is better to wait than it is to set the hook to soon.
    I have seen kings nibble, nibble, nothing for seconds, nibble, nibble, nothing, and then whammo off it goes like a rocket. Got one the other day that this went on for up to thirty seconds and we were just running plugs without bait but it still did not take it right away. My advice is when you get hit say one king salmon, two king salmon, three king salmon and then set the hook or try to wait at least three seconds before moving the rod. But once you start to move the rod there is no turning back. Just try to make sure the fish has it before you hit em.
    Spoken like a true veteran... I also like to wait... Funny I have had the same experience's w/ plugs... Sometimes they will bite on those things forever it seems like, just have to wait tell the hook themselves.

    Some of the best backbouncing guides I know like to just stop all movement one getting a bite, just let the fish take the bait and wait patiently, typically these fish will swallow the bait if they are allowed too.

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