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Thread: First Aid and Quikclot

  1. #1
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    Default First Aid and Quikclot

    Have any of you had to use Quikclot to stop bleeding? I am planning a trip to AK and, as part of my first aid kit, I always include at least one package of Quikclot. I have used it several times to deal with bad cuts/wounds. Quikclot is type of gauze that has a substance in it that causes blood to clot. I was told about it by a friend who just got out of the Army and he had used it when a buddy was wounded. I bought a package of it and carry it with me on hikes. One the people I was hiking with cut himself badly and I used it to stop his bleeding. You just put the gauze pad on the wound and apply pressure. It stopped the bleeding in just a couple of minutes. He ultimately needed stitches to close the cut, but we were able to get him to the emergency room by just bandaging the wound. Otherwise, we would have had to have him airlifted from where we were. Since then, I have made Quikclot a part of my medicine cabinet at home as well as in my backpack first aid kit. It's available at Quikclot.com.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Are you selling it? Cause this kinda sounds like an advertisement...

    As for clotting agents, they have their place, but that place is pretty rare. Learn what the limitations and contraindications are for the stuff you carry so you don't cause a bunch of unnecessary harm. Normal bandaging materials should be used first. I wouldn't waste an expensive clotting agent on wounds that can be easily taken care of with a gauze pad and a little direct pressure.
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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Quikclot should be used as a last resort when other methods have failed (direct pressure, elevation of wound, and pressure points). The use of a cauterizing agent will destroy some tissue that, while stopping bleeding and saving a life, will need to be removed by a doctor. I'm not familiar with the gauze form, but the powder form that is poured onto a wound generates a lot of heat and is extremely uncomfortable (to say the least) for the injured person.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    I am a remote medic and have used both types, loose powder and impregnated gauze, the latter is easier for the ER folks to debris. For traumatic large avulsions and hemorrhage it works and has been proven in battle for combat related wounds such as those inflicted by bullets. So in my opinion pack it along just in case.

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    Default There's better stuff out there....

    But I can't remember what it's called at the moment... I'll ask a few questions around work tomorrow and get back to y'all.

    New stuff does less damage and requires less work to "fix" when the Dr's finally get to work on the patient.

    Mike

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    Member Mr. Grayling's Avatar
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    The powder form is the one that I am familiar with from being in the military. Like Kay9Cop said, use as a last resort even after a torniquet is used. I didn't know they made a guaze form. Sounds like some neat stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kay9Cop View Post
    Quikclot should be used as a last resort when other methods have failed (direct pressure, elevation of wound, and pressure points). The use of a cauterizing agent will destroy some tissue that, while stopping bleeding and saving a life, will need to be removed by a doctor. I'm not familiar with the gauze form, but the powder form that is poured onto a wound generates a lot of heat and is extremely uncomfortable (to say the least) for the injured person.
    "In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." John Muir

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    I agree that the stuff can save a life. I have seen more than one soldier that come into the Balad AFTH while I was AD there and they probably wouldn't have made it otherwise. I will talk with some of the surgeons here and see what their view on it is. I do know this, DO NOT GET IT IN YOU EYES! The powder kind especially can get blown into your eyes durring opening in even a mild breeze and will blind you! I would take extreme percations using this stuff!

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    it has a role in combat wounds. those are caused by high velocity bullets or fragments from IEDs. they do a lot of damage going in or out and cause profuse bleeding.

    wilderness wounds for the most part are not like that and can usually be controlled with direct pressure.

    the gauze form is much better than the loose granular form. i don't think it is needed in a wilderness med kit (unless it is a large kit), but the size of one gauze packet is so small, i couldn't fault someone for carrying it with them.

    it is not cheap though, so if you are short on funds, i would say take a pass on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hre814 View Post
    it has a role in combat wounds. those are caused by high velocity bullets or fragments from IEDs. they do a lot of damage going in or out and cause profuse bleeding.

    wilderness wounds for the most part are not like that and can usually be controlled with direct pressure.

    the gauze form is much better than the loose granular form. i don't think it is needed in a wilderness med kit (unless it is a large kit), but the size of one gauze packet is so small, i couldn't fault someone for carrying it with them.

    it is not cheap though, so if you are short on funds, i would say take a pass on it.
    Hunting rifles cause damage from high velocity bullets and as much as we all make an effort to practice good firearm safety there is an idiot there somewhere that does not.
    Now what ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevelyn View Post
    Hunting rifles cause damage from high velocity bullets and as much as we all make an effort to practice good firearm safety there is an idiot there somewhere that does not.
    Very true. Sometimes all I see are idiots around me. But I don't see hunting rifle/bear pistol accidental discharges or hunting accidental shootings as a probable event when one goes out into the wilderness. No stats to back it up, but I feel it is a very low probability compared to other wilderness related trauma.

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    Default Quikclot

    The military has gone away from Quikclot now due to the damage it can cause. It is actually not authorized to carry now (at least when I was there a year go), although a lot still do over in Iraq. The HemCon hemostatic bandage is my personal choice now. It's expensive though and you have to be in the medical field, government, military, or law enforcement to get it.

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    the army issues Quickclot gauze bandage to insert into wounds. just had some issued to me two months ago. they no longer use the granular Quickclot as it was difficult to use and got in soldiers eyes, etc.

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    Things must have changed rapidly. Were you issued a HemCon as well or just the Quikclot bandages?

    Quote Originally Posted by hre814 View Post
    the army issues Quickclot gauze bandage to insert into wounds. just had some issued to me two months ago. they no longer use the granular Quickclot as it was difficult to use and got in soldiers eyes, etc.

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    no hemcon issued, but they still use it. different strokes for different units i guess. but the one thing you won't find is the granular Quickclot. they all work well and are all expensive.
    Last edited by hre814; 06-12-2009 at 21:07. Reason: info

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    The current use of Quick Clot powder and Hemcon dressings has been suspended by the military here in Afghanistan they are only using the Quick Clot gauze which is impregnated with a different chemical than the powder they previously produced. It works well and does not leave any contaminates in the wound to be cleaned out in the OR and does not cause any burns. It does take a little longer to get the bleeding controlled but well worth the time and for the cheap price and size of the packaging I can't see any reason not to carry it.

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    I can confirm on the last post, Iraq they have stopped with the Hemcon and the powder form of quik clot and are pushing the new gauze quik clot.

    Hemcon is very limited to use for the most part and is hard to apply when there is a lot of blood, it sticks to everything and you still have to apply pressure for 4 to 5 min. It was made for those hard to get to location that a torniquet will not get too ie... pelvic girdal etc.

    Trauma dex is another type out there too.

    The bottom line is don't lose your head and work with what you have at hand.
    Good luck

    Sweepint
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