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Thread: Deshka to Lake Creek

  1. #1
    Member Fisherwoman's Avatar
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    Default Deshka to Lake Creek

    I've been told that a trip from the Deshka landing to Lake Creek is possible in my 20' Weldcraft Renegade and should only take about 2 hours.

    Besides mapping it before trying it - any suggestions for me?

    I've only been on Lake Creek once, and that was via fly-in to Bulchitna lake.

    Thanks for any help!

  2. #2
    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    beautiful fun trip - makes me wish gas wasn't so expensive (and that I still lived in anchorage)

    go all the way to the mouth of the yentna - don't try to take the shortcut that the airborters and some others might. I think it only saves 2 or 3 miles and it you'll be hating life if you get stuck trying to save 2 or 3 miles! (I know from experience!)

    if you're unfamiliar with the run down from the landing to the yentna see if you can talk to someone else launching and if they are going your way ask if you can follow them.

    if you're going to fish the mouth of lake creek lots of the boats up there rig a bouy to their anchor set up and then just use a short rope and caribeaner to hook up to the bouy - when you hook a king you unhook from the bouy and ease your way out of the crowd to fight it and land it.

    If you like meeting new people Dan and family at Yentna Station are great - we always stopped in for gas and coffee on snow machine in the winter.

    Lots of friendly folks on that river - enjoy the trip!

  3. #3
    Member Fisherwoman's Avatar
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    Bouy, anchor, caribeaner, nice folks, all the way to the mouth - Check!

    Sounds like this might be a great adventure!

    How much extra gas should we take? The tank is 35g, and we're installing a flowscan this weekend, so I'm not sure how fast we use it up yet.

    Thanks for the info.

  4. #4
    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    Probably should ask what kind of experience you have on rivers in your boat or prior boats.

    What other rivers have you been on? Do you have the gear (and know how to use it) if you get stuck?

    Don't be intimidated, it's just that people have been turned off from jet boating by biting off more than they can handle right away without building some experience first. One horrible experience can sour people pretty quick!

    Don't forget to plan for paying at the landing...no idea how much it costs these days. I think they have a website.

    As for how much gas - figure out what you burn and then be sure to take some extra. If you want to buy gas enroute - Yentna station sells gas and they are probably 20 or so miles into the 50 or so mile trip - not sure if anyone else along the way does (we always hauled drums), but don't cut it too close as drifting is not nearly as fun when it's unplanned!

    Things look different coming down river on the return part of the trip - don't rely on a GPS for precise navigation or to run when you can't see but it can help you remember which side of an island to take if you have one and record a track on your trip in. (I say don't use it as gospel guide to where to drive your boat - because in addition to the biggie of "eyes belong outside the boat" even a 12' error, which is about as good as my gps gets, can put you 24' off course (12' error when you recorded the track and another 12' when you are following it back out) and that's assuming your GPS is zoomed into the 200' scale and your precisely on your track - mine is never zoomed in that far and I don't follow a track super closely.

  5. #5

    Wink

    The run to Lake Creek is an easy one. All big river and deep channels, if you stay in the mainstem of the rivers. If you have a chance to look at a map, it will help. Pretty simple run though, even without a map. Lots of places to explore along the way as well. Check for fish in any one or more of the clear water tributaries along the way. Like Moose Creek, Indian River, etc. Fish spawn in the tributaries as well as rest up there, before going on upstream. Pike, Rainbows, Salmon and right now Hooligan are the fish of the day. Bring a net and bucket.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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    Default can I make it with a prop

    I have no river exp. but I need to get it I am taking my 22"atec up the yukon I need to learn some how any Ideas

  7. #7
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    I think it is about 47(?) river miles to Lake Creek. You should run into someone making the run.

    Remember it takes more gas going up river than it does going down.

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    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    I think it is about 47(?) river miles to Lake Creek. You should run into someone making the run.

    Remember it takes more gas going up river than it does going down.

    And it is "UPRIVER" both ways. BassKing is pretty close on the trip miles I generally run about 100 miles between checking a few spots and moving around on the river and most times chasing a few fish.

    When water is running low it's easier to pick your channels. High water is where folks find themselves in trouble as main channels flood and higher water only channels look good. Then you come back and the water isn't nearly as high and those channels are now dangerous or have no water.

    The Su does get quite braided in a few places going to the Yetena and it is sometimes hard to see what is main river vs a side channel as the river does make a few hard bends. Just read out as far as you can see and constantly scan and it will be fine. At the confluence of the Su and Yetena, you "MUST" not turn in earlier or fade to the right. Stay mid channel. It is wide here. You want to get close to being almost down river of the Yetena before turning back up into the Yetena river. The south bank on the Yetena is where the good water is. Coming down the Su you will see a cabin with a flag on the hill for the turn upriver.

    A good rule of thumb is a high steep bank means deeper water. But do look for slough off or trees leaning into the water. Wide river areas can be tough. Slow water and shallow water can be common. Also when running near the bank keep a sharp lookout for under water sweepers and sweepers in general. It was just a few years ago where a young man was fatality injured on the Yetena by a sweeper.

    If you find someone to run with from Deshka Landing ask them if they run the "Barge Route" this is the best water low or high water, especially higher up the Yetena River.

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