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Thread: Trees

  1. #1
    Member ksbha4's Avatar
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    Default Trees

    I know that Lowes and HD sell a few Oak and Maples. Do these trees do ok up here? I haven't really seen any real sucessful Oaks and Maples around. Is it a waste of time to try to plant these trees?
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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Those trees are tough to get to grow here. I have seen several attempts and non lived more then a few years.

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    Default I wonder if...

    it has more to do with frost killing off the deep rooted trees vs. our native birch which has shallower root systems. Anybody know?
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    The trees that I've purchased from the big box stores have never survived. The trees that I've purchased from Mill Feed and Bell's have thrived. The local-based greenhouses and nurseries won't sell you stuff that won't grow here.

  5. #5
    Member ksbha4's Avatar
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    Default Hmmm,

    maybe that's why my two apple trees refuse to grow anything bigger than a hazlenut.
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    The best apple trees I ever bought were from the Saturday Market in Anchorage. Locally grafted and very productive. Fast growers, too.

  7. #7
    Member ksbha4's Avatar
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    Default Your Apple Trees

    I take it that your apple trees bloom and produce well. My wife was saying that once again, ours are not blooming. (I'm in Kosovo so I can't do anything about it this year) Do your trees cross pollinate with themselves or do you have another variety of tree that pollinates your apples? As soon as I get home next spring, I will be buying some new trees!
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    I have six trees in a fairly close row. I don't know who pollinates what and I've never needed to assist. They bloom and the bees come. Even with the cold summer last year we had lots of fruit, just smaller in size.

  9. #9
    Member ksbha4's Avatar
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    Default Soil

    Did you do any soil prep or add fertilizers, or did you just plant em' and let em' go? How about pruining?
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    The best production years we've had were years when I used fruit tree fertilizer spikes and regular watering. I've pruned but only for my convenience to be able to mow the area. I know nothing about pruning for the health of the tree or for fruit production. If anyone here does I'd love to learn!

  11. #11
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    The best production years we've had were years when I used fruit tree fertilizer spikes and regular watering. I've pruned but only for my convenience to be able to mow the area. I know nothing about pruning for the health of the tree or for fruit production. If anyone here does I'd love to learn!
    The old rule of thumb for commerical apple growers in NY was prune anything that grows upwards, or outwards.

    The goal being a compact, fruit dense tree at harvest time.

    some people prune for height creating an umbrella or bonsai like effect--all the fruit bearing branches within relatively easy reach.

    This thread brought back one of my fonder memories...picking a tart, crisp macintosh or three on the walk to school. (apple trees in my hometown were like dandelions...everywhere)

    Be warned...moose love applebark. Cage your trees if you're going to plant them

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    The best production years we've had were years when I used fruit tree fertilizer spikes and regular watering. I've pruned but only for my convenience to be able to mow the area. I know nothing about pruning for the health of the tree or for fruit production. If anyone here does I'd love to learn!
    I am no expert, but you need to secide if you want a pretty tree or a productive tree. Orchard trees are not good looking trees, but are realy productive. You will want to prune ant branches that cross or are rubbing together. Also any small branches that are compeeting for light with the major branches. There are normally two goals when pruning an apple tree: 1. Initially on young trees to encourage a strong, solid framework.
    2. On mature trees to maintain shape and encourage fruit production.
    The best time to prune apple trees is in late winter or very early spring before any new growth starts. The only growth you ever want to prune or remove during the summer months, when the tree is actively growing, is a sucker. On young and old trees, remove all suckers that grow up from the rootstock.

    When pruning just about anything, including apple trees, here is a list of situations you always want to prune out.
    A. Suckers
    B. Stubs or broken branches
    C. Downward-growing branches
    D. Rubbing or criss-crossing branches
    E. Upward growing interior branches
    F. Competing leaders (the branch that is the tallest in the center where you have pruned the trunk is the leader)
    G. Narrow crotches



    What you will probably be doing is pruning mature or neglected trees

    Mature trees usually already have their shape determined, so it really comes down to maintaining their shape and size. Every year:
    • Remove broken or diseased branches
    • Crossing limbs
    • Weak stems
    • Any branches growing inward to the tree's center
    • Any growing vertically or straight down
    • Thin out enough new growth to allow light to filter into the canopy when the tree has leafed out so the fruit can ripen and color properly
    • Shorten any branches that are too long to avoid leggy growth
    • Shape tree evenly and remember apples flower and fruit on old wood, so head back new growth to direct energy back into the flowers and fruit
    also, if in the past years too many apples have formed and crowded each other out, you can thin the spurs to only a few per branch. This will allow enough light and air to circulate around to avoid diseases and small, puny fruit.

    For neglected trees where the tree has become bushy and weak and will produce very poor quality apples. The tree requires extensive corrective pruning. The main objective in pruning such a tree is to try to open up the interior to allow good light penetration.

    The first step is to remove all the upright, vigorous growing shoots at their base that are shading the interior. It is necessary to select 3 to 5 lower scaffold branches with good crotch angles and spaced around the tree. Limbs with poor angles, and excess scaffold limbs, should be removed at their base. In some cases it is advisable to spread the corrective pruning over two to three seasons. When severe pruning is done in the winter, the trees should not be fertilized that spring.

    It is almost impossible to kill a tree by pruning it, so don't worry about over doing it.
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    I may have overdone it. I just pruned all seven of my apple trees with a backhoe. Seriously, they were fun for a few years, but became a nuisance. I never really liked apples, anyway. I hear cherries do well up here. I may try that next. Do moose knock down fences to get to cherry trees?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    I may have overdone it. I just pruned all seven of my apple trees with a backhoe. Seriously, they were fun for a few years, but became a nuisance. I never really liked apples, anyway. I hear cherries do well up here. I may try that next. Do moose knock down fences to get to cherry trees?
    What did you do with them once they were dug up? If they are still around I would like to collect some wood for the smoker off of them. Nothing better than salmon bellies smoked over apple wood.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Gone with the willows that started me on the tree removal project. I sorry to say I never even thought about saving the wood.

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