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Thread: Catquivers

  1. #1

    Default Catquivers

    Does anyone here use a Catquiver? I have been thinking about using one of these instead of a regular quiver but am trying to find some feedback on them. For the price of a good quiver I can get a Cat for about the same price.

  2. #2

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    I'm not sure what the catquiver is, but I just recently switched to the tightspot quiver and am very impressed with it. It's definately worth a look.

  3. #3

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    Catquiver is a small backpack with a quiver attached to it, comes in several different configurations.

  4. #4

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    they do look neat but my concern with using them is where do you put your frame pack? Sure you can hook it to the side of the frame pack while in use....sounds like more of a pain to me.

    I have a lakota style quiver I can sling wherever I want without tying anything up. works well, but probably not for most people. I love it though!

  5. #5

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    Well I wasn't planning on using one while backpacking, I want one for day hunts where all I need are just a few things to get me through the day. I have a full size Osprey for backpack hunts and just carry my bow.

  6. #6

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    I'm sure they'd work well for day hunt quivers if weight isnt an issue. They have a ton of different sized bags for them I think the largest is the the 5? Personally I've given thought to building a st charles style quiver, which is basically a cat quiver made back in the 30's. But honestly most of my hunts are back pack based, weight being an issue, I can only afford to carry one quiver.

  7. #7
    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    I am not a huge fan of the on the bow quivers, so i bought one and just strap it to the small backpack that I usually carry with me when I am out hunting.

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    I started using them the spring of '08 while on an Peninsular bear hunt. I've since used them on several different hunts and have no plans on going back to hauling arrows around on the bow again. They are secure, easy to reach plus makes for a lighter setup. I have a couple of different models and depending on what I need in the way of extra gear, I pick the one for the job.

    They were hard to find a while back. I heard their factory was damaged in a fire. Glad to hear they're back in business.

  9. #9

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    I made a quiver that I can sling over my neck or strap to a pack. Used some thin walled 4" pvc, 1/4" threaded rod, and 1" foam seat/knee cushion.
    Carosel holds 6 arrows, protects whole arrow from the elements or brush. Could use smaller diameter for fewer arrows. Works for my style of hunting.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bowguy View Post
    I started using them the spring of '08 while on an Peninsular bear hunt. I've since used them on several different hunts and have no plans on going back to hauling arrows around on the bow again. They are secure, easy to reach plus makes for a lighter setup. I have a couple of different models and depending on what I need in the way of extra gear, I pick the one for the job.

    They were hard to find a while back. I heard their factory was damaged in a fire. Glad to hear they're back in business.
    How easy is it to pull an arrow out of the Catquiver when you need to make a shot?

  11. #11
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    As easy as with a bow quiver with the added feature of little to no movement seen from the front. Reach behind you, grab the arrow shaft and with a slight upward pull, the arrow will be free of the quiver. Another nice feather is the overall length where the arrows are kept is fully adjustable.

    I mainly went with the Catquiver because of the high winds generally found on the Peninsular. I just thought less wind load on the bow would be a good thing. At crunch time I was glad I was using this quiver. Since then, I've used it on antelope and whitetail hunts. It will be with me chasing elk come September.

  12. #12

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    Which version is good for day hunts? I was thinking of the Catquiver III.

  13. #13
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    It really depends on what you'll be carrying. The model III will carry a good bit of gear. Always better to have a little extra room than not quite enough.

  14. #14

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    Works great in open country. Easy arrow access and keeps your feathers dry. If you plan on traveling through thick stuff leave it home. You can't duck low enough or side step without catching a limb. Be sure the arrows are in properly and the quiver adjusted. If an arrow falls out it will land on your calf. If travel down a steep slope take it off so you don't fall on your arrows if you slip. If you're day tripping get a III or smaller so you don't carry too much. They're not a back pack. Get the waist fanny pack option to help carry your water. The pack gets too top heavy with all your gear plus water. String wax helps take the squeaks out. Practice with it loaded full of gear. That's when you'll likely get your shot right out of camp.

  15. #15
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    Interesting that I found the location of the quiver on the back made for easier traveling through alders than would have been if using a bow quiver.

    Boud'arc makes some good points. The Catquiver does have limitations but I think you'll find it to be a good alternative to the bow quiver.

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