Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Fly in hunt for 1?

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    9

    Default Fly in hunt for 1?

    I have been unsuccessful in finding a partner to go to Alaska with. I was to hunt with my wife until we had a addition to our family. There have been people willing but when it came down to it they aren't people I feel have a good sense for what is going on around them. As a result I have hunted most of the lower 48 and the parts of Canada you can w/o a guide. Is it really out of the question for me to come up for a fly out hunt by myself? I have done plenty of hunting by myself but I am not claiming to be an expert in Alaska.

    Pete

  2. #2
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Thumbs down Solo...

    I'm generally a strong advocate of solo hunts, and I often encourage people to strike out on their own as a great learning experience and confidence builder. But, sincerely, if you are not familiar with this country I would not recommend it.

    Alaska is bigger than you might think. The storms are truely wilder than you can imagine. The isolation is complete when you are out there by yourself. If you lived here and had been preparing for a solo hunt with "baby Alaskan steps", then I would support the idea. But coming up from the lower 48 to Alaska for a solo hunt is just too big of a leap.

    Although I have completed 18 successful fly-in and/or backpack solo hunts for sheep, mt. goat, black bear, and regrettably also for moose, I believe it would not be responsible to recommend a solo hunt for you or anybody unfamiliar with Alaska, given the limited amount of information provided.

    One goal is to live a full and exciting life. Another of my lifes goals is to grow old enjoying my kids and their kids. So get a hunting partner...and a satilite phone.

    Dennis
    AK TAGS

  3. #3

    Default

    What were you wanting to hunt......and where were you wanting to hunt....?

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    I'm generally a strong advocate of solo hunts, and I often encourage people to strike out on their own as a great learning experience and confidence builder. But, sincerely, if you are not familiar with this country I would not recommend it.

    Alaska is bigger than you might think. The storms are truely wilder than you can imagine. The isolation is complete when you are out there by yourself. If you lived here and had been preparing for a solo hunt with "baby Alaskan steps", then I would support the idea. But coming up from the lower 48 to Alaska for a solo hunt is just too big of a leap.

    Although I have completed 18 successful fly-in and/or backpack solo hunts for sheep, mt. goat, black bear, and regrettably also for moose, I believe it would not be responsible to recommend a solo hunt for you or anybody unfamiliar with Alaska, given the limited amount of information provided.

    One goal is to live a full and exciting life. Another of my lifes goals is to grow old enjoying my kids and their kids. So get a hunting partner...and a satilite phone.

    Dennis
    AK TAGS
    Please explain the"regrettably" part. just curious.

  5. #5
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim in anchorage View Post
    Please explain the"regrettably" part. just curious.
    I am assuming that he is referring to just how un-fun packing an entire moose out solo must have been.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I am assuming that he is referring to just how un-fun packing an entire moose out solo must have been.
    So I guessed. I dropped a 50 right next to the raft on a solo float trip, and that was a 2 day chore cutting and loading. I just wondered what he went though.

  7. #7
    Member Phil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Liverpool, NY (a suburb of Syracuse)
    Posts
    494

    Default Second

    I absolutely second the recommendation for a satelite phone if you insist on hunting solo. And carry it with you - don't leave it in camp. Read what Backcountry Robb wrote about safety. In spite of our best efforts, accidents do happen. A satelite phone can be a life saver.

    As an outsider, I have hunted Alaska many times and I still feel more comfortable when I have a companion. Of course, my age may have something to do with that but I hunted Mt. goat in Alaska when I was 37 and I was very thankful for companionship.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    2,127

    Default

    Obviously a companion increases your safety exponentially but that said, it's often about the choices you make. Most great "adventure" stories have a bad call or two behind them. (most not all, crap happens)

    If you want to do a solo, it's so about the choices you make, if it's moose, don't shoot one far from camp, have an extraction route in mind before you pull the trigger, read up and watch videos on field dressing a moose (it's not rocket science but there are definitely some good tricks and themes out there). It seems so many times that if you have a bunch of guys...someone always thinks that a three mile pack is that much easier (I dont hunt with that guy anymore)

    Get in shape and take your time. Bring solid and tested equipment. (no price tags when you get off the plane)

    Definitely get a satellite phone, it's about half as effective as a partner but it's better than smoke signals or deep prayer. Just play it way conservative, no reason to go all hardcore on your first trip, plan an easy float or a drop off in an area that has some other folks at least within the general area.

    Even the time spent there with nothin but the amazing environment that Ak offers you will be time and money well spent. Don't get all wrapped up in having to shoot something to be successful.

    disclaimer: this only applies to folks that have a head on their shoulders, don't hit the panic button easily, have extensive experience dealing with dead critters in other places, know how to guy out a tent, are in decent shape, don't have too much pride to ask questions, actually listen to the answer to said questions, respect the environment, have some mechanical aptitude, and are generally just not a ****** nozzle.

  9. #9
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Lightbulb Go solo

    ...one last parting shot about going on solo hunts in Alaska...

    Again, I have often been an advocate of solo hunts for various reasons. But do not go solo in Alaska because you can not arrange for hunting buddies to go with you.

    Rather, go solo in Alaska only when it is in your blood and heart and every waking thought, and your friends are begging to go with you. And then, go solo on a lengthy excursion only after many weekend or three day outings, and after hundreds of winter hours at the gym and only after many hundreds of summer trail miles.

    The wrong reason to go solo...is because you don't have hunting buddies who will go.

    The right reason to go solo ...is because you have the training, experience, confidence and the burning desire go on a soul searching solo expedition, while your friends are pleading to go with you.

    ..and don't forget about those pleasures in life like your lady and kid(s). If you screw-up bad enough on a solo gig, and sometimes it does not take much...they gonna miss you. Solo in Alaska is not right for everybody.

    Dennis
    Alaska True Adventure Guide Service

  10. #10
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,392

    Default

    Having only done one fly-in hunt, I'm no expert on the field...but I feel like I recall people mentioning on here that some air services absolutely will not drop off solo hunters. Is this the case? Will they only make exceptions for past clients that have demonstrated their competence? Or...am I remembering incorrectly?

  11. #11
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default case by case

    Hi Brian,
    Your memory is correct, in that each air taxi service handles solo hunters different. Twenty years ago I had one air taxi refuse to take me out, only to have his brother agree to take me a few days later. Keep in mind that the same guys who fly us all out for compensation, will also conduct the search and recovery, not for compensation, if a hunter fails to show at the landing strip on the pick-up date.

    Some will. Some will not. Some can be persuaded. Some can not be persuaded. It is their airplane. And they have already paid $100,000.00+- for an insurance policy for June through September. Every time an air taxi drops somebody off I believe he is wondering if "the surviving spouse" and her lawyer are going to test the insurance policy.

    Dennis

  12. #12

    Default just my thoughts

    Here is what I learned from several solo hunts in alaska while being stationed up there. Either a Sat phone or a personal beacon should be on you at all times. Have a plan, give it to someone and stick by it. Know your limits and stick to them. Make sure your gear is top notch. I would say the biggest thing to worry about is the drastic changes in weather. Have you ever packed in Alaska??? The only reason I felt confident enough to go solo---was because I worked for a guide and packed out 5 moose for him one year. With that said, I think solo moose hunting is nuts---unless you have a chain saw to butcher the critter with---because you aren't going to roll him by yourself. I was lucky that there was a family staying in the area that I was hunting---they walked the 1.5 miles from camp to come help me---thank God they did---because I am still not sure how I would have finished that task. It took 4-10hr days to get my bull back to camp and I was whooped. The good aspect of hunting solo, you dont have to count on someone else---you only have to convince yourself.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    today-Idaho
    Posts
    394

    Default 6 posts

    You do not have many posts here. I assume you have not 'advertised' here. Placing this note may net you a couple of private messages from others in your shoes.
    Last year I searched about for a partner and finally found one. I used several sites. The partner is a great person and fun to be around, but, I suggest you do a shorter/closer trip together before you go bush.
    I did get an outfitter to drop me solo, I can give you his name if you PM.
    6, 10, 14 days alone can be a VERY long time. I personnaly enjoy it now but I recall some sadness at first. Kinda like watching a comedy alone and giggling at the funny parts, looking around and finding no-one to share it with.
    Be very, very careful and have a great time!

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    9

    Default

    First, I appreciate all of the replies.

    I think I should clarify: I have hunted solo exclusively for the last 5 years and am no stranger to the deafening tone in your ears after days of absolute silence, its cleansing. The reason I wanted to go with my wife is we wanted to share the experience together. I was interested in a partner because I'm not stupid, there are alot of ways to die in the bush. You never saw anyone butcher a deer more deliberately then me alone, miles from help. I have top end equiptment but may get a heavier tent because I don't have to carry it. I carry my pack year round. I also camp on the ice in northern Mn. And Wi. in the winter below zero. Not the most comforable thing in the world but I get out 3 times more due to the cost savings. I have a compass and a spot, they share the same spot around my neck. I also was not going to tackle moose, just caribou, Blacks (if avail),wolf.

    All that said: I'm not stupid, and appreciate the advise of people who have been there.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,636

    Default

    Whitetailsinc,
    Common sence aint so common, as we know, so guys here are just kicking out what they think is important.

    Hunting alone is just fine, I do so rather often especcially during winter, and I boat around alone, often. No satlink, but often a Marine VHF hand held.
    I bring my wife and kids camping/hunting quite often, even when she was expecting, maby you should bring her anyways....Good times, fresh air and exercise is good for a woman and kids.

    You should Hunt Alaska, its worth the risk.
    Go missing or if you get killed, oh well, you'll die in action.

    Never hunt Alaska and grow old with regret.



    Just do it.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Soldonta, Alaska
    Posts
    315

    Default Go for it

    You sound plenty experienced to me. Driving in your car to work is way more dangerous than a alaska solo hunt. These guys are trying to help you but you already know you can do it. Pilots dont like droping off solo guys. My last solo hunt was a goat hunt and i had to talk the pilot into it. I prefer to hunt with a partner but if i have a permit i am going hunting with or without. Have a good hunt.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •