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Thread: Job in Prudhoe Bay - Questions

  1. #1
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    Default Job in Prudhoe Bay - Questions

    My husband has applied for a position, within the company he already works for, to advance in the field of Safety & Health. It is located in Prudhoe Bay. We are now waiting to hear back, I am so excited .
    FYI, we currently live in South Carolina. He has lived all over the US, I have only live in SC, but I did vacation with extended family in AK for a month when I was 14.
    And I have tons of questions! I have been reading on the board for the last two days and that has helped a lot, but...

    What is the closest town for housing, we will probably be renting to start - have a home to sell here first?

    We have a Chevy Z71 4WD king cab truck & a Jeep Grand Cherokee, both are late 90's models, the truck has a new engine. Would you recommend we keep 1, or sell & upgrade? I do know that tires will need to be upgraded and heaters added for oil & maybe transmission.

    I don't know yet if the company will pay moving expenses or if we will have to. If we have to, what should I not leave? I am thinking on the lines of furniture, dishes, tvs..that kind of stuff.

    I know there will be more, but that's all that I can think of for now.
    Thank you for "listening" and I can't wait untill I can say I am in AK!

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    Default Fairbanks or Anchorage

    Hi,

    I work up north in Prudhoe and the airplane that flys workers to and from Prudhoe has 2 cities that it stops in, either Anchorage or Fairbanks. you can live anywhere you just have to be able to get to one of those airports. Some guys that I work with live in Soldotna ( a few hours away from Anchorage) and just pay the airfare to get to Anchorage every 2 weeks. If he gets the job I would come up and travel around to see what part of Alaska you like! hope this helps you out.

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    Default Thanks

    AKOVIS yes that does help alot. Thank you for the info, I am checking things as much as I can online now, I just want to try and be as prepared as I can be. But that definately gives us an idea of how "it works".

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    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    PM sent to you.
    Lurker.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Just to clarify, the oil companies have their own small fleet of 737's that shuttle workers to the slope, they are called Shared Services. There are 2-3 r/t's a day, except Saturdays when they don't fly. Depending on what part of the field he works in, he'll have a set day to rotate in and out.

    While all ss flights run from Anchorage to the slope, only some of them go through Fairbanks. So have him find out when his changeout day will and what flights are available on that day.

    Assuming a 2&2 schedule, it comes down to how far he or you are willing to drive to get to the airport on changeout days, or whether he wants to have a connecting flight to somewhere else in the state. Personally I wouldn't want to deal with connecting flights, flight delays et al. Plenty of nice places in the state within a few hours drive, it just depends on what amenities, or lack of amenities you are after.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Default Slope work

    I also work on the slope and I live in Soldotna. As far as where to live goes you can live just about anywhere you want. I work with people who live in Alaska but also Louisiana, Texas, Alabama, California,Arizona,Maine,etc. etc.
    Some of these guys moved from AK. after they got settled on the slope and some have never lived here.One of my old alternates lived in the Virgin Islands.We worked a 3x3 ( 3 weeks on 3 weeks off)schedule. Anyway you don't necessarily have to move from SC. At least not right away.Many people find they just can't handle the time away from home. You might want to wait until he has decided the slope really fits him well before you move the whole family. The out of state tickets can get spendy but their are ways to get the cost down. Have seen people only lasted a couple of hitches before they had had enough . Just something to consider. CHRIS

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    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    I agree with what has already been said, Slope work and Alaska arent for everyone. Give it a rotation or two before you decide to sell off everything and move up here, he might even be able to stand the slope.

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    There is sound wizdom in these words from the other posts

    We moved up from 9400 ft in the mountains of CO and love it here but it is not for everybody. To move up will cost a good bit to drive. I went throu our house hold this came with us about two trailer loads and that was it. If your vehicals are in good shape and paid off then it would be better to keep them then buying more up here.

    If there are obtions to come up and work rotation before you move then i would do it and get a feel of the place winter and summer. That was not an obtion for us but i do not regret a bit moving up here. We live life year around here and have fun at it.

    Good luck on what ever you decide to do and feel free to PM me if you have further question.
    Regards T

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  9. #9

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    I was curious about the money you spend on the slope...is your housing free for your rotations? Do you pay for your own food? How much money is typically spent on a 2 week rotation? Thanks for the replies

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cmizo View Post
    I was curious about the money you spend on the slope...is your housing free for your rotations? Do you pay for your own food? How much money is typically spent on a 2 week rotation? Thanks for the replies
    I work in Prudhoe (actually up here at the moment), of course there is exceptions to this, but the majority of the employers up here provide you with housing and food which is generally served in a buffet style. Yeah the rotation schedule isn't for everyone but if you can make it work it is pretty darn sweet to have 2 weeks off every month whereas most people work all year for their 2 weeks of vacation. Granted there are no weekends up here. HAHA!!!
    Last edited by Alaska_Lanche; 06-28-2009 at 10:19.

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Ditto to Lanche...its definitely not for everyone and doubly tough with kiddos, BUT if you can hang, it'll be the best part-time job you'd ever have! Oh, and the money you spend on the slope is whatever you can find online....**my wife hates this site***

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    I agree with giving it a try before moving up here. About half of the people from my company live out of state. Personally I wouldn't want to deal with that much flying, connecting flight problems (if your flight from wherever is late, you don't get to work), and an extra 2 days away from home, but....lots of guys do this.

    As for where to live in Alaska, if you are looking to avoid flights, then you just need to find somewhere that you like that is within a few hours from the airport. A lot of guys live in Wasilla, Palmer, Houston, etc. These are places that are a little cheaper to live in than Anchorage if you would rather have a little more land, fewer people, etc. The Kenai penninsula is also pretty popular. Kenai, Homer, Soldotna, etc. You can either drive or fly from these places. The drive would be 2-4 hours and the flight would be 30 minutes or so.

    Here is a good website that you can look at to get a better idea of house prices in various areas. http://www.alaskarealestate.com

    Good luck,
    Richard

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    brings to mind the question often asked..."are you married or do you work on the slope?"

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    Default mechanical jobs on the slopes

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    I work in Prudhoe (actually up here at the moment), of course there is exceptions to this, but the majority of the employers up here provide you with housing and food which is generally served in a buffet style. Yeah the rotation schedule isn't for everyone but if you can make it work it is pretty darn sweet to have 2 weeks off every month whereas most people work all year for their 2 weeks of vacation. Granted there are no weekends up here. HAHA!!!
    my 2 sons will be finished with diesel school this year an they have a couple of years experience how well are the jobs up there for that. we have been to alaska an love it, planning on moving up this coming year. also how much do they pay, not to be nosey but i have heard several quotes.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by angela View Post
    my 2 sons will be finished with diesel school this year an they have a couple of years experience how well are the jobs up there for that. we have been to alaska an love it, planning on moving up this coming year. also how much do they pay, not to be nosey but i have heard several quotes.
    There are diesel mechanic jobs on the slope every different field has a few or a shop full.
    Slope jobs are not always easy to get. Your best bet is to look at all the contract companies as they do all the work on vehicles and equipment up here. ASRC, CH2MHILL,Udelhoven,Peak to name some of the biggest ones.\
    Also check Haliburton, Schlumberger,Little Red services sometimes hire mechanics.
    They need to check those companies websites regularly and when an opening comes up apply for it every day until it closes or they notify you they have your resume.
    Fresh out of college without knowing a someone who works here the odds are slim. There are usually dozens if not hundreds of applicants for every job listing especially with the economy the way it is.
    As for pay I couldn't tell you what a mechanic gets payed. Depending on experience I would guess $22-$25 starting maybe a bit more if the person has a lot of experience. With overtime most people up here make at least $60,000 a year and it goes up from there.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    I will second the statement that you should not move till he has a couple hitches under his belt. I have lived in Alaska all my lifr and almost didn't stay my first hitch up here. It all depends on who you work for and what your doing. I started in the middle of January working outside and it was not fun. One divorce, a new wife and 11 1/2 years later and I'm still working here. It takes time to get the rotational schedule working in the Arctic to decide if it's for you. I would hate to see you spend all the money to move here and find out it's not gonna work out. Doesn't matter how tuff a man is either, this jobs not for everyone.

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    So who are the jobs on the Slope for???

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomtom View Post
    So who are the jobs on the Slope for???
    People with a certain skill set, safety first mindset, ability to speak politically correct, and know somebody with an inside track on the hiring process.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Good answer
    I was hoping you would have added; 12 years experience in industrial construction/maintenance/&operations, certified pipe and structural welder, 7 years of industrial construction management/coordination/inspection, ACI certified construction inspector(none in Alaska, but a few hundred field techs), offshore deepwater drilling(hitch experience), ability to interpret drawings, knowledge of codes, hazmat/safety/firefighter/rescue training, water/wastewater treatment licenses, Class A drivers license, computer literate, clean background....

  20. #20
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomtom View Post
    So who are the jobs on the Slope for???
    I have to agree with Joat on this one.
    One common thing is that I often talk to people with no oilfield experience who think they are qualified for some of these jobs.
    As an example lots of people claim they can weld. Welding mufflers on cars at your local midas is miles away from the welding that is done on the slope. All of our welders can weld stick and tig. Stainless and carbon steel. Your welds will be subject to x-ray inspection looking for even the minutest little flaw. failure rate of less than .5 (1 failure for every 200 welds) is the minimum we are allowed. Our shop is currently at .05 failure rate(1 failure for every 2,000 welds).
    There are a lot of jobs where related experience does apply though. For instance cooks and housekeepers although they are on the low end of the pay scale. Vehicle mechanics and equipment operators etc. etc..
    Safety is our highest priority and if you can't work safe all the time and follow all procedures and safely preform all aspects of your job 100% of the time then the slope is not for you. We are not allowed to cut corners up here.
    I also get people who want to jump into slope work without first gaining some training and experience elsewhere or who don't want to take a lower paying job and work their way up to something better later.
    I worked in the Kenai/Nikiski oilfield for over 7 years before accepting a transfer to the slope. I started at $11 an hour in the VECO shop in 1999 and I was glad they gave me a shot.
    Lots of guys nowadays complain when they start them at $20. Makes me laugh every time.
    Often times companies will hire temporary workers say for a turnaround in Nikiski and will hire a lot of people. You can learn a lot working those kinds of jobs and eventually you will have accured the skillset and the experience and mindset of a safety culture so that you will appeal to a person hiring for jobs up here.
    I know one fellow who decided he wanted a slope job so he began applying. He was persistent and it took five years of applying for every job he might possibly be qualified for before they gave him a shot as a summer hire roustabout.
    3-4 years later he is a lead and doing quite well. How many of you would continualy apply for 5 years?
    A friend of mine was discouraged to not get a job in witch he had over 12 years experience for. He couldn't believe he was passed up figuring someones kid got the job. When I met the guy who got the job I found out he had 26 years experience!
    Don't give up when you don't get that first job you apply for and continue learning and working towards your goal of working on the slope all the time.
    Don't be afraid to take a lesser position and working your way up once you get up here. If possible find an oilfield job elsewhere and you will gain some valuable skills and knowledge that will help you in the future.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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