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Thread: Kids ATV

  1. #1

    Default Kids ATV

    Looking for one for a 6 yr old boy. Is a 110 too big? He is mech inclined drives power wheels and a bike without training wheell since 2 days before 4 yrs old. But, he is fearless....what is the size under 110? Could he ride it for a couple years? Someone near Talkeetna gave him one but it is a death trap and I will not even try to get it running. He is heart broken, so let me know if you know of a reasonable one, probably under 110. Where can I find a chest protector? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    I purchased a Polaris 50cc machine for my 5 year old earlier this year. Trust me, there is a lot of difference between riding an electric "toy" or tiny bicycle and one of these small gas powered rides. I understand the desire to find a machine that the child "can grow in to", but after doing the research, I'd advise against trying to cut corners. I think even more important than engine size is to pick one that physically fits him NOW. Can his feet easily reach the footrests so that he can shift his weight as necessary? Can his hands PRESENTLY reach and manipulate the throttle and brake levers? The physical differences between a 6 and 10 year old are enough that you are not going to be able to find a machine that is truly appropriate for both ages.

    When talking engine size, you need to differentiate between 2 stroke and 4 stroke. 2 strokes will have approximately twice the power as a comparably-sized 4 stroke, but no where near the torque. Most new machines nowadays are 4 stroke.

    The "official" guidance is no larger than a 50 cc for kids over 6, and no larger than 90cc for kids over 12. While many people regard those limits are legal CYA, I think that a 110cc machine for a 6 year old is pushing the envelope farther than you probably want to.

    You may have heard about the smaller ATVs (those under 90cc) getting caught up in a lead-ban. The Consumer Product Safety Commission has decided to put off enforcing this rule for a year, but many dealers are no longer carrying the smaller (under 90 cc) machines because of it.

    Many manufacturers make 50cc machines. A few, such as CanAm, also make a 70cc as well or in place of a 50. Most manufacturers also make 90cc machines. The only 110cc's I've heard of are Chinese off-brands. Typically the frame size increases with motor size--but there are variances between manufacturers, so shop around.

    Depending on your budget and the kid's size, also consider the Polaris Rzr 170--which has a roll cage and seat belts.

    How much can you throttle the power down so that it will still run and pull, while limiting top speed? Like you said, young kids are fearless--but an early bad experience can permanently turn them off from wanting to ride. Realistically, you probably don't want the kid riding much over 20 mph--and only after they have developed the skills to handle it. Don't get too hung up on suspension travel for these machines--they are usually only a few inches anyway. With their very-short wheel bases, they tend to buck around on bumps rather than absorbing them to any great degree (another reason for wanting to limit the speed...)

    On these smaller ATVs, particularly the off-brand ones, parts availability and overall reliability can be an issue. Do your homework before buying one.

    Features you are going to want are electric start, adjustable throttle stop, and if you plan on riding in crowded areas such as Jim Creek, some kind of headlight is a good idea to increase their visibility.

    Also, increased weight of the machine will lower the combined machine-and-rider center-of-gravity, and thus increase stability in off-camber situations. So while light-weight is desirable for ease of loading and getting it unstuck, as well as racing, for a learner you might want to consider weight to be an ally--so when comparing, give the nod to the heavier machine.

    Finally, on your question about chest protectors, be sure to differentiate between those designed to protect from rocks being thrown from machines in front of you (which is what most usually are), and those designed to provide actual impact protection in the event of a crash.

  3. #3

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    sr12345 has given you some solid advice. Hopefully, to add something meaningful to this thread, I will give my thoughts.

    Personally, I would call all the dealerships and look for a new, brand name, reasonably priced, 90cc hold over. I have been told the cheap 110cc Chinese atv's out there are not all that safe. The chain sprocket is exposed by the childs foot, and to me they look top heavy.

    When I was in search of an atv for my daughter I looked at a few 50cc atv's. Come to find out most brand name 50cc atv's are Chinese/Korean atv's with spiffy name brand stickers. If you switch your sights to the 70/90cc models of the same brand you will gain a motor with higher quality parts, running lights, and a few other upgrades. The aspect that really led me to a 90cc for my daughter was the fact that a lot of the 50cc atv's are of similar dimensions, but with a smaller motor and less features for only $500 less at the time. I ended up buying an 07 90cc Can Am.

    That atv was a big large for her at the time. Her feet touched the floorboards and so on, but the atv was large enough for both me and her to ride together. You sure can't do that with Hot Wheels. With both of us riding at the same time I was able to coach her and stop the atv when she was going to fast or out of control. It took a lot of patience and many hard lessons learned on her part but five months later, and a healthy dose of govenor, she is driving the atv all by herself around a 1 acre lot. Would you have guessed my daughter turns four in two and a half months?

    For my child it has worked out well, but it might not with yours. Go with your gut and whichever route you choose make it a fun event whenever you pull out the wheeler for him to ride. But when he does not listen or becomes irresponsible make it be known. That worked for me. Strap a helmet on the lil one, train him, and have fun.

  4. #4

    Default Child ATV

    Thanks. Will take advice into consideration. I thought the 110 maybe too big. And the Chinese one looked too unsafe.

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    when my sone turned 6 a few years ago I got him the Arctic Cat 50.. although everything but the stickers was made by Kymco it had held up to tons of beatings..... and use..


    now my son is 9 and I need to get another..... I am thinking the Arctic Cat 150 ... which not sure if its still kymco but I think it is....

    but he has been riding for the last 3 years..... .


    another story my daughter..... ( abuddy thought hey she is his daughter I can let her ride this she knows how.) Well she has eye sight problems.. and is technically right now legally blind ... so I never had her drive an ATv..


    well the buddy put her on one of the death trap 110's I wasnt around at the time I was cutting camp wood


    well she hit the throttle and there she went.... smopke right through camp hit my ATV and flew off.... its a **** good thing I taught my kids helmets Rule.... cuz she would have been a life flight helo ride out of where we were at....( I was pissed and started flipping out..... )


    so just make sure what size you buy matches the rider style as mentioned above.......

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    Member Ebbtide's Avatar
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    I posted a Honda 90 ATV on craigslist a few days ago. You could bring you kid by and see how they do. I bought it when my son was about 8 y/o and wished I would have bought it earlier. He had a 50 cc previously and maxed out its capabilities rather quickly. If interested, look for the Honda trx 90 in South Anchorage.
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    Default Go with a 50

    I bought my 5yr old son, and 7yr old daughter Yamaha 50ís. I too pondered going with a larger machine. I can say that after two years of riding them Iím glad I bought the 50ís.

    The 50ís are lighter, a smaller person can learn to handle the machine. A week after my son started riding he rolled the machine on its side. Scared the hell out of me; I was outside with them, and let me tell youÖ you canít run fast enough to stop what your eyes will watch! That taught him a good lesson, and he is cautious about what he rides over now.

    Here are some things to consider: Breaking, smaller, lighter machine will stop quicker, and easier. The smaller kids just donít have the forearm strength to lock up the breaks. Weight; how much weight do you want on top of your son? Do you want him to master the machine, or the machine to master him? Getting stuck, my kids are learning how to get unstuck by their self.

    After about 2 months they will ride at full throttle, no matter what size the machine. We are going on year 3, and Iím ok with letting them continue to ride the 50ís. Now they are now learning how to ride the machine vs. just hanging on for the ride.

    Protective equipment: Helmet, goggles, Chest protector, boots, and gloves (thin gloves to prevent blisters).
    Never let him ride alone, you will always want to outside close by.

  8. #8

    Default My Five Year Old Rides a 90cc

    Sounds like everybody here as already given you great advice. Our son sounds exactly like yours fearless.

    My two kids ages 4 and 5 each started riding two years ago as passengers on our Yamaha 350 and 700. We started off on the power-wheels bikes and once they got the feel for those wanted to upgrade to something larger to allow them to go along on rides with the family on their own.

    We initally looked at the off-brand 50 cc bikes for my then 4 year old (he fit well) but appeared that he would have only gotten one year out of it. To include as previously mentioned the sprocket and gears appeared exposed to his legs.

    We decided since this was a starter bike (and didn't know if he would be that into riding) we purchased a 90cc bike from ACME. The first summer he rode at age 4 he couldn't stay out very long because he was tired from wearing the helmet and pushing the levers. Although, his first rides were in our wooded and hilly back yard on a 1/2 acre -he learned to ride up at the Knik River Bridge by the sand bars and did really great.

    By the next summer he was unloading at the race track and follows behind me on my bike with my husband following him down the wide open trails to the mouth of Jims creek. He can now easily shift his weight, control the bike, spin-out, and get stuck and un-stuck by himself. At this time the governor is only out to 10 mph with plenty more to go (although it will probably be at lest next summer before he gets more throttle).

    Personally, I think that he is ready to take on some smaller trails but the frame clearnace to the ground is very low and still sometimes can cause them to get stuck on large rocks (again proably would not be an issue with more throttle). I checked into some of the other kid ATV's and the clearnace is approximately the same on each of those as well.

    He has rolled it once when he first started riding when he went out of our driveway and onto the road and turned around to look at his "flag" on the back, a little scratched and banged up (scared me to death) but a lesson learned and has never occured again or went to blacktop.

    One thing, I do like about this is when we ride if and when he gets tired (not so much anymore) two people can easily pick it up and strap it down to the back racks of a larger bike and carry it out on the back. For us we went this route to ensure the interest factor would remain.

    The drawbikes to these bikes is the batteries. If left connected when not in use normally have to find yourself jumping the battery from yours until it is charged up and would definately give it an overall tightening of componets prior to first ride.

    Again, go with your gut instinct, while he has enjoyed his four wheeler he now his eyes set on wanting to ride dirt bikes.....good luck!

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Default Bought my 7 yo an 80

    I did the same research a couple of years ago, and I wound up going with a Yamaha grizzly 80 for my (then) 7 year old son. There was almost zero difference in overall machine size between it and the raptor 50, and it was choked back so much that it would hardly move in 2nd gear (three speed foot shift) This was perfect for him starting out. I had him use only first

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKsoldier View Post
    I did the same research a couple of years ago, and I wound up going with a Yamaha grizzly 80 for my (then) 7 year old son. There was almost zero difference in overall machine size between it and the raptor 50, and it was choked back so much that it would hardly move in 2nd gear (three speed foot shift) This was perfect for him starting out. I had him use only first
    The autoclutch manuals are great for this! I started on a ds80 dirtbike at 7. It had a clutch but my dad told me to ignore it except for stopping and starting. To start I did everything in second gear, never shifting. Then I started banging through the gears without the clutch. It wasn't long after that before I was jamming through the gears and able to use the clutch properly. I even learned how to feather the clutch to get the revs up to yank the front end. The important thing when they start out is to get them focused on DRIVING THE BIKE! Keep the other stuff to a minimum. If they are worried about all sorts of other things they can get flustered and forget to do things like steer
    I have 2 Suzuki LT 80's that I am hoping to rebuild for my boys. I would like to find another one or two for additonal parts but it is hard to expect my wife to go and pick them up with me gone. My goal is to work with them to rebuild their quads so they have some understanding of what makes em tick. My dad brought home my first dirtbike and handed me a manual to go with it, he said "Boy you better read through this thing and lear how to fix it, cause if it breaks and you can't your going to get mighty tired walking everywhere!" I still fix my own stuff to this day.

  11. #11
    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    LOL, I don't know what happened to the second half of my post. It got cut off. I agree the auto clutch trannies are great for the kids. The other thing I like about the Grizzly 80 is that all of the performance mods are reversible, and it will run forever so when my son moves up to something bigger, I can choke the 80 back again and his sisters can learn on it too.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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