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Thread: Hewescraft--question for Hewescraft owners

  1. #1

    Default Hewescraft--question for Hewescraft owners

    This is about boat speed.
    I have a used hewescraft 26' Alaskan with twin 115 Yamahas (seems to be the norm). They run great. I question the speed though. Are Hewescraft boats slow? I have been running them at 4500rpm's and doing about 23 kn according to the GPS. WOT does about 30 kn. Is this normal for these boats? I'm fine with the speed if that's typical, but it seems slower that other boats in a 26 foot class.

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    Default weight is always an issue

    when it comes to speed. I have a 26' pacific cruiser with twin 115's and a156 gal fuel tank, radar rack, raft, extra kicker ,grill, and all kind of stuff plus people and my top speed was 40 kts. in Kachamak Bay (tide assist). That was 07'. I haven't seen that speed since. I don't think it's the boat. I'm no expert but I think everything runs better on new plugs. I hope you enjoy your boat as much as I've enjoyed mine. Be safe.

  3. #3

    Default slow...

    I have the same set up and hitting over 35 mph is not hard. I did do 42 mph my first year. I usually run 20 to 25 mph. When was your last tune up?

  4. #4

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    I have an 07 Pacific Cruiser with twin 115's. Those numbers seem right and really close to what I'm running. Keep in mind a knot is 1.15 miles so 23 knots is almost 27 mph.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Wheels View Post
    my top speed was 40 kts.
    Really? Do you mean miles per hour because 40knts is about 46 mph. Upper 30's seems reasonable light. Just my opinion.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildog View Post
    This is about boat speed.
    I have a used hewescraft 26' Alaskan with twin 115 Yamahas (seems to be the norm). They run great. I question the speed though. Are Hewescraft boats slow? I have been running them at 4500rpm's and doing about 23 kn according to the GPS. WOT does about 30 kn. Is this normal for these boats? I'm fine with the speed if that's typical, but it seems slower that other boats in a 26 foot class.
    I would be more concerned about the RPMs at WOT than speed. You should be in the 5700-6000 range. If you are not, you might consider repropping. You do not want to lug these engines. Just a thought.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    I would be more concerned about the RPMs at WOT than speed. You should be in the 5700-6000 range. If you are not, you might consider repropping. You do not want to lug these engines. Just a thought.
    I'm feeling a little ignorant, this is my first outboard after many years of inboard jet boats.

    These engines have over 1200 hours on them, but the seem to run great. It will go up to 5500 or higher actually but I don't like to run them wide open for very long, it just seems like it would be hard on them. It's a four cylinder inline so I wouldn't run my minivan with the foot to the throttle for very long either.

    The props have lots of small dings on them around the edges. Could this have something to do with it? They are also not counter-rotating, and I don't know how much this affects performance either.

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    I would not worry about the counter rotating issue. Deweys does not like to sell the right/left turn combo. Trimmed up you should hit the upper end of the max RPM range. If not, the engines can build up carbon. Don't you remember telling Dad that you were just blowing the carbon out of the old station wagon as you sped down the highway? You do not have to run at WOT, but you should from time to time for short periods.
    Last edited by Brian M; 06-01-2009 at 10:46.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Member EJPainter's Avatar
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    Default

    On our Kenai river boat (yamaha F50), I notice a performance loss when I have dings on the prop for sure.

  10. #10

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    He didn't mean you should run wide open all the time, just be propped so the motors can run up in the 55-6000 rpm range. That way you are not lugging the motors. Cruise at the best ride or economy. I run that Yamaha engine cleaner in my motors, and once a year I do the aggressive clean on it, as stated in the instructions. I gain back 300rpm every spring when I do that. My nephew has the same boat running stainless 15 pitch Turbo's and hits 38-41 mph.

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    Default yes, really.

    I've only hit that speed once but it is my highmark. Coming back from Pearl Island and racing charter boats. WAAAHOOOO!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Wheels View Post
    I've only hit that speed once but it is my highmark. Coming back from Pearl Island and racing charter boats. WAAAHOOOO!!!
    Nice!!!!!!!!!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    My boat is in its third year, and I've never seen anything over 36 mph at WOT and that's at 5900-6000 rpm. I cruise at 4800 rpm which nets 28 mph and 12gph. I've always wondered as the Hewes marketing blather shows top speed of 44mph at WOT for this boat/motor combo. Of course, I don't run at top spped because the fuel burn goes to over 23 gph at WOT!

    SH

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Our '01 model 26 Alaskan (long cabin) has twin 115's as well. With Solas aluminum 4-blade, 17-pitch props, we get just a hair over 35 MPH with it at 5700RPM with a heavy load of 5 hunters and full fuel tank (120 gal.). At that load & speed, we burn about 20GPH. With a lighter load, I'm sure 40MPH is possible in this boat.

    At cruise we're getting 2.1 - 2.2 MPG at 28-30 MPH. Off the top of my head, I don't remember the engine RPM at cruise. 5000 - 5200RPM ?



    If you're not getting the speed you expect, there are a few of things to check......

    1 - Sea Conditions & Tide - a choppy sea and running against a fast tide will slow you down. I know. This one is pretty obvious.

    2 - Engine trim - Do you trim the engines up to find the sweet spot for a smooth ride and better fuel economy? The bow should not be plowing through the water, nor should it be porpoising. The front end should feel light, but not bouncy.

    3 - Trim Tabs - If you're using a lot of tab pressure, they will slow you down. Try shifting your load and using less tab pressure to get a level ride.

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    I forgot to ask if your boat is trailered, or if it sits in a slip. I assume the bottom of the boat isn't fouled with growth.

  16. #16

    Default Props

    I adjust the trim tabs and motors the best I can, and the bottom looks good. We tuned the motors already. It sounds like a first step might be to get some better (less dinged) props and see how it performs. Right now I have three bladed white props with dings on the edges.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildog View Post
    I adjust the trim tabs and motors the best I can, and the bottom looks good. We tuned the motors already. It sounds like a first step might be to get some better (less dinged) props and see how it performs. Right now I have three bladed white props with dings on the edges.

    GO stainless and don't look back. I switched from aluminum 3 blade to stainless 3 blade and picked up both speed and economy at cruise. Deweys will let you swap out props until you get them dialed in. A 1000+ hours is a lot of hours for any prop if they are original. With the higher horsepower outboards, props tend to flatten out after about 800 hours +/- . Now go out and get her bloody! How about some pictures?
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  18. #18

    Default Sounds good.

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    GO stainless and don't look back. I switched from aluminum 3 blade to stainless 3 blade and picked up both speed and economy at cruise. Deweys will let you swap out props until you get them dialed in. A 1000+ hours is a lot of hours for any prop if they are original. With the higher horsepower outboards, props tend to flatten out after about 800 hours +/- . Now go out and get her bloody! How about some pictures?
    Pete,
    I'll look into stainless props. How much are they? What do you mean about being dialed in? Don't I just get two props and put them on?
    And ok, here's some blood from 3 days ago. It was a bloodbath.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  19. #19

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    hes refering to trying different diameters and pitch on your props. Generally the motor can only take a few different diameters, but the pitch can vary to what you want to do with it. And theres always 4 blade vs 3 blade props. I think 4 blades are better to keep you on plane at lower speeds and give you better low end power, but you lose your top end speed. As for pitch, I get confused sometimes. I believe the more pitch you have, the less top end you have but better low end torque, less pitch means better top speed but you lose your low end torque.

    And btw, I'd suggest stainless We ran stainless all last year and switched to aluminum to test different pitch/diameter, and after two trips with aluminum they are all dinged up and bent a little. Just from small junk in the water, not hitting anything with any density at all.

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    Griff pretty much nailed it. Deweys has done a bunch of prop testing, but the numbers they post really are not that realistic. Most of us run our boats full fuel and gear, so the numbers will vary. I believe that they are carrying solas props. I am running a pair of 14.25" x 17" 4 blades and have been very happy. They are not cheap ($400+/- a piece), but your economy should go up and your props will stay true longer if you don't hit any of the big stuff. Nice limit of fish, by the way.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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