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Thread: Muggy sleeping bag...

  1. #1
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    Default Muggy sleeping bag...

    I'm currently using a Marmot helium sleeping bag and have noticed that it is extremely muggy. The tent ventilates well (no/very little condensation) but my bag is hella humid even when it's cold and dry. I wake up pretty sweaty even with the zipper unzipped all the way.

    I was wondering if anyone else has or had a problem like this and what y'all recommend to remedy it? Should I get a liner for sweat absorption or should I sleep with a bag of rice?

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Perhaps try a liner of some sort. There are quite a few out there maybe one w/ cool max would help. I have a feeling you are simply a hot sleeper and put off more moisture than the bag can transport. Have you tried a synthetic fill bag? Do you have the same issues w/ them?

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Sounds like too warm a bag for the conditions it is being used in - that is a 15 degree bag, what was the temperature when you were using the bag? Depending on the tent, temperatures inside a tent can be anywhere from 5 to 20 degrees warmer than outside ambient temperatures.

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    Temperatures ranged from up 30s to lower 20s at night with a decent wind blowing through so the bag may have been a little warm. I've had a synthetic bag in similar situations with the same temperature rating and it was no where near as muggy. I tried sleeping with the bag as a "blanket", fully unzipped and my body directly on the sleeping pad, and it was still muggy. Basically, no matter what I did the bag just didn't breath. It's really annoying having one side of you be super cold and the other covered in sweat.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    That is classic! I have found myself in similar situations. I now carry only 20* bags in the summer/fall and just plan on layering up in it on colder nights.

    It sounds like the bag was just simply to warm. but another good thing to make sure is that you are not breathing inside your bag. You exhale an amazing amount of moisture and if you do it into your bag it will certainly make it damp in short order.

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    A liner isnt going to help anything, you thought it was muggy before and it will be worse with a liner....you need a different bag for summer. Say around 30* rating.

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    with a good 15 degree bag like the helium, you need a lighter bag for those temps. it was just too warm for you. i have had that happen many times in my down bags. also, is the helium the EQ or regular one? the EQ has a more water resistant shell. i have the helium and hydrogen and they are great bags. if you have the cash, the hydrogen is a great bag (it is a 30 degree). in the summer i use it as a comforter and lay on top of my pad.

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    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Vapor-permeable is the adjective, and characteristic, you're looking for.

    Taylor

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Taylor View Post
    Vapor-permeable is the adjective, and characteristic, you're looking for.

    Taylor

    Okay......

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    I have found that sleeping bags that have taffeta nylon liners tend to stick to my skin, and feel sort of muggy or slimy. For that reason, I only buy sleeping bags that have a soft cotton liner.

    I feel the same way when placing the sleeping bag on a inflatable rubber or plastic mattress or pad. Perspiration is expelled away from my body, can't pass the pad, and comes back into the sleeping bag. Now I use breathable foam pads of roll beds with a cotton liner. As these pads or beds get soaked during the night, I let them air-out during the day by creating lots of ventilation in the tent. Also, the heater helps things dry out quite fast.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default No solution? More answers!

    Good thoughts among previous responses. One other thing I've tried is airing the bag out during the day. Puzzling to me - sounds like it's been cold enough.

    You sweating at home?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6XLeech View Post
    Good thoughts among previous responses. One other thing I've tried is airing the bag out during the day. Puzzling to me - sounds like it's been cold enough.

    You sweating at home?
    I do the same with my sleeping bag. I just have a rope tied to the two ridge poles of my 8' x 10' tent, and use this rope to hang the sleeping bag and other stuff to dry when I am not at the campsite.

    I don't zip my bag when not cold enough, and use it as a blanket instead. Only zip it when real cold such as when ice forms on the top outer layer during the night.

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