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Thread: Sheep Boned Weight?

  1. #1

    Default Sheep Boned Weight?

    As sheep season slowly but surely creeps up I have been trying to figure out pack weights. I am curious what a "mature" boned out ram w/horns + head cape would weigh. Obviously an overall weight of all the meat and bones, etc that are required to be legal in AK.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimss View Post
    As sheep season slowly but surely creeps up I have been trying to figure out pack weights. I am curious what a "mature" boned out ram w/horns + head cape would weigh. Obviously an overall weight of all the meat and bones, etc that are required to be legal in AK.
    For mature rams, Eastern Brooks Range - 200-220 live weight - 100 lbs hanging weight and 80 lbs "boned". From what I saw in Chugiaks those sheep were larger. Sheep from the "southern" ranges tend to be larger. Another 15 - 20 lbs for cape and horns.
    Can be quite a difference between what is "required to be legal" and what is ethical.
    Good Luck
    Joe (Ak)

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Heavy!

    It's always just a major load and you'll have to haul it strait uphill at midnight just to get to the proper ridgeline that will put you back on-route.

    80 Ibs sounds about right. Just imagine strapping two 45 pound Irons from the gym on your back plus gear......ya thats about right and what I'm mentally prepared for.

    I really don't know about sheep. I'll be doing my first sheep hunt this year in the Brooks.

    I've done plenty of large Sitka Bucks and a few large Mt. Goats. All of those have been way back in the mountains on DIY hunts.

    It's almost June and time to get your training turned up a notch. The days are longer and a guy/gal should be taking advantage of it.

  4. #4

    Default Plan for

    about 80#'s, but could be a bit more or bit less depending on bullet damage of meat.

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default sheep weight

    Any where from 75 to 90 pounds, thats including ribs and how much hide you are bringing back, and whether you saw the horns off or bring back the full skull. I have done the sheep packing shuffle before, and most of you know what I mean because even with a barneys pack, sometimes you can't get the whole sheep along with gear at one time, and doing a 3 to 5 mile pack back to main camp from spike camp, you might as well bring the hide and horns and endure the pain rather than go thru it again twice. Besides, foxes and golden eagles will tear up your hide within a matter of hours if left unattended. I'm sure many of you have had this experience. I had to leave my sheep to lay overnite last season, because my kid shot a griz prior, we were only 1.8 miles from our camp as the crow flies, and the bears got to my sheep, but I mange to salvage most of it. We new therewere bearsin the area so we made alot of noise to scare them off the carcass, we were tired and beat, and not about to shoot another griz.

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    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Default

    My experience with eastern Brooks Range rams is similar to Joe Want's describe above. I have seen some nice Chugach rams on the hoof that looked to be close to 50% heavier than some of the Brooks sheep. Maybe 50% bigger is too much, but they were notably larger in the body.

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    Once you get started, do not and I repeat do not stop at a stream to wash the blood out of the cape... It will add another 20 lbs. to the load - I did just that and the cape was like a sponge - had to pack the added water all the way to our pick up point.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default one trip

    The one sheep I harvested was in the Delta draw area, and when I weighed pack with sheep, skull cap, and full hide in it, was 145#. My pack alone when I started in was about 55#, and I had used up my food. Best guess is the meat, hide and horns all together were 100#, give or take 5. And that was full hide and hooves, not just the cape.

  9. #9
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Capes

    Sheep capes will, or course, weigh more when soaking wet. But I do prefer to attempt to wash and scrub the blood out of the cape if it has not dried. Most or all of the water will drip out of it if you hang it over a bush for a night. I fold the capes with "salted skin against salted skin" so the wet hair can drip dry and air dry.

    I take two plastic Gaterade bottles full of salt, or about four or five pounds. After the second salting is shaken off the cape and the bottles go into the fire, you are five pounds lighter for the hike-out.

    Regardless of how much deboned meat you recover, you will have ten pounds less in a few days. Speaking solely for myself, I can eat a lot of sheep meat.

    I generally cook the ribs, which have very little meat on them, over the first open fire after the kill.

    Dennis
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    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobG View Post
    Once you get started, do not and I repeat do not stop at a stream to wash the blood out of the cape... It will add another 20 lbs. to the load - I did just that and the cape was like a sponge - had to pack the added water all the way to our pick up point.
    It is well worth the trouble and slight additional weight to get the blood out of the cape before it dries. Very hard to remove blood after it dries.

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post

    I generally cook the ribs, which have very little meat on them, over the first open fire after the kill.
    Agreed on the lack of rib meat!! Sure wish there was more.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobG View Post
    Once you get started, do not and I repeat do not stop at a stream to wash the blood out of the cape... It will add another 20 lbs. to the load - I did just that and the cape was like a sponge - had to pack the added water all the way to our pick up point.
    We never wash the cape until we get back to camp. Very seldom ever get them off the mountain the same day shot. Important they be well soaked before "scrubbing" so the hairs don't break.
    Have used hydrogen peroxide, but not certain it was that big of a "plus".
    Joe (Ak)

  12. #12

    Default Edible Meat

    According to the regs all edible meat must be salvaged. It sounds like it is possible to bone out the entire sheep other than possibly the ribs? It also looks like you don't have to salvage the meat below the knees (distal joint)?

    If sheep meat is eaten at camp or if some of the meat is damaged by bullet how do you prove this to the game warden? I guess it may be good to take photos at the kill site and cooking at camp?

    I can understand how 2 x boned hind qtrs could easily weigh 30 lbs each or 60 lbs/pair and w/cape, horns, boned front legs, backstraps, etc could add up to 100 lbs quickly!

  13. #13
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Common sense, if the trooper doesn't believe you ate the ribs give him the position of your kill and your camp and let him investigate. He will have to prove you are lying to prosecute you. No ribs at the kill site = you are probably telling the truth. Bar-B-Qed rib bones at the camp site is further validation. They have the burden of proof and you are innocent until prove guilty. As far as regs go, the term "edible" leaves a lot of grey area! I do not try and salvage anything below the knee on any game animal, I also don't take grouse legs. Blood shot meat is not required to be removed. My wife had much of the neck roast destroyed on her moose due to the 180grn silvertip hitting a vertibre. The impact was explosive and turned a good roast into jello. There is no expectation to remove that from the field. As I said Fish and feathers may go and inspect your kill site, if they find evidence that you left edible meat you can and should be charged.

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    I prefer to leave the meat on the bones even when I am by myself. I have weighed the leg bones on 3 different sheep after I have trimmed the meat off back at home. One sheep was 6 pounds total for all 4 legs (not including the hooves left in the field) the other 2 sheep were 7 pounds each. Not much of a weight penalty for much more and much better quality off meat. Every cut you make into meat in the feild often turns into wasted meat. Not a big fan of boning.

    Hide adds a lot of weight so if you are not planning on mounting or selling the hide you can save some weight. Once back to camp if the pack is to heavy or the terrain too tough I turn it into two loads and relay it out.... not as bad as it sounds.

  15. #15
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    You guys don't try to harvest the meat below the knee? Or...do you mean the ankle? The meat of the calf is excellent for making burger or sausage, and there is a lot of it there.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    You guys don't try to harvest the meat below the knee? Or...do you mean the ankle? The meat of the calf is excellent for making burger or sausage, and there is a lot of it there.
    We salvage to the knee, no meat below that point. Attachment shows where we cut the legs on everything (we going to eat).
    Percentage listed are amazingly close to what I found on six mature dall rams I weighted in their entirety.
    Joe (Ak)
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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Multiplied weight

    7 pounds x's 1 million steps= Alot more work!

    7 pounds x's 1 million steps= Happy dogs!

    Somtimes I love my dogs alot! Other times, Not so much.

    With great care and good field work boned meat can be just fine. I do agree with you that bone in is best. What I've done as a compromise is, I'll do a quick job of loading the pack, bones and all and move to a location where I can work very clean and at my own pace. Sometimes the next day. With great care and consideration I can produce a product fit for the table.

    I've always been a weight watcher at that stage of the game. Not too anal though......I still pack out my trash or burn it completely.

    I love working up a sweat with a heavy game laden pack......noisy and happy.

  18. #18
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default FYI

    I take the lower leg muscles too. Below the knee for burger.

  19. #19
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Default Sheep Meat

    Diagram did NOT show harvesting neck meat?

  20. #20
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    Default

    It's too valuable and tasty to leave any of it. I too like to eat the ribs. heart too. But there's nuthin like a big hunk of sheep meat on a stick over a fire a poppin and a sizzlin, and when that fat runs down your chin.... well... you know...



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