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Thread: Scent Bag

  1. #1

    Default Scent Bag

    I've never bothered to put down a scent bag, but I'm sure many of you have. Over this past weekend, With tides being what they were, I decided to give it a try. I tied my bag of goodies to my Bruce halfway down between the clasp and the safety tie. I couldn't get my hook to hold, always seemed to be dragging a little. What seemed like a good idea turned into a pain in the rear. I ended up mucking the idea and reset without the bag, no problems (and caught fish). What did I do wrong?

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    I tie mine where my rode line connects to the chain, not to the anchor. I haven't had any problems with it hanging up when pulling the anchor.

    But I generally drift rather than anchor.

  3. #3
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Send it down!

    No need to tie it off. I use a mesh bag like you buy oranges in, fill it with smelly bait, throw in a cannonball weight, and tie it up with some gagnon line (leaving a loop). After I set my anchor, I send the bag down the anchor line on a pre-rigged stainless hoop with a snap. It stops where my rode meets my chain.

  4. #4

    Default

    use a downrigger or we use a gurdey reel keep the bag off the bottom a foot and check and herring oil it up every hour......
    BONEYARDBAITS THE BEST HALIBUT, ROCKFISH GRUBS ON THE PLANET....''06'' WORLD RECORD LINGCOD ''08'' HOMER HALIBUT DERBY WINNER''. BOTH FISH CAUGHT WITH BONEYARDBAIT GRUBS WWW.BONEYARDBAITS.COM

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks Boneyard. That was going to be my next try. It just seems easier, including hauling the anchor (with a bouy), as well as keeping it fresh.

  6. #6
    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    I've used both methods with great success for the past twelve years. If using a downrigger, crank the downrigger up if you hook into a big one. We lost our largest halibut in twenty-five years because it got wrapped around the cable and was cut.

  7. #7

    Default

    we also use a five gallon rubber chum bag and smash it with a fish bat in the five gallon pail.........the more sent trail the better......... they sell the bags on ebay.......good luck
    BONEYARDBAITS THE BEST HALIBUT, ROCKFISH GRUBS ON THE PLANET....''06'' WORLD RECORD LINGCOD ''08'' HOMER HALIBUT DERBY WINNER''. BOTH FISH CAUGHT WITH BONEYARDBAIT GRUBS WWW.BONEYARDBAITS.COM

  8. #8

    Default The "Blood Bomb"

    One deck hand tied a ziplock bag onto my line that was full of frozen blood and fish parts, a couple of small holes on it. Within a few minutes I caught the largest fish on the boat.

  9. #9
    Member
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    Default Bait freezer

    Every year I clean out the bait freezer to make chum balls with an old meat grinder. This years batch has herring, hooligan, old cured salmon eggs, guts and heads of my ice fishing bounty. This made about a 10 gallon batch. Scoop about gal and a half into freezer bag and let freeze. Rip bag off on day of fishing and put into crap pot bait bag. Goes down with a 5lb weight on extra rod. Convinced it helps without a doubt.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Homertime View Post
    I've never bothered to put down a scent bag, but I'm sure many of you have. Over this past weekend, With tides being what they were, I decided to give it a try. I tied my bag of goodies to my Bruce halfway down between the clasp and the safety tie. I couldn't get my hook to hold, always seemed to be dragging a little. What seemed like a good idea turned into a pain in the rear. I ended up mucking the idea and reset without the bag, no problems (and caught fish). What did I do wrong?
    I'm with Paul on tying it to the top link of chain where it joins the anchor line. No interference with anchoring while the action of the boat tends to "shake" it and keep pumping out the scent. That's a bonus after it's been in the water awhile.

    We have one refinement that's worthwhile when you're moving lots. We tie the bag onto the chain with a 3' piece of line. When you haul the anchor that allows you to pause and stick the bag into a 5-gallon bucket before bringing the chain and anchor onboard. No dripping mess and no tangles with the anchor rig while you're changing locations. We move around a lot and anchor half a dozen times a day, so the extra 3' of line is pure bonus points.

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