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Thread: Hewescraft VS Seasport?

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Default Hewescraft VS Seasport?

    We just got back from Homer, using our 20 foot riverboat for something other than what it was intended for, had a great trip.
    Had such a great trip that it wasnt long and I was thumbing thru my stack of "real boats" brochures. While flipping thru the Hewes book I took notice of a testimony for a 22 foot Ocean Pro. It went something like this,
    "If someone were to tell me a 22' welded aluminum skiff would ride better than my 22' Sea Sport, I wouldnt have given them much credibility, but its true." So it got me to thinking, now I know some of it is just plain ole marketing and advertising, but I would like to know if its true. I am not intending to start a thread on which boat is better. I would just like to hear from someone who has had both boats or at least spent some time on both boats. Which one handles the rough weather better?
    Other pros-cons?
    Favorite motors?

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    This sounds like war.......And so it begins....

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    I agree..... close but so different smooth quiet S.S. or tie it to a log for the afternoon O/B vs. I/O and on and on..........fun one good job

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    Maybe we should start a pool on how long this one isn't locked by Brian......

  5. #5

    Question Well...

    I have owned the 26' Alaskan Sea Runner for 8 years. A friend of mine had a 27' Sea Sport for several years. I consider his boat a better "blue water ocean boat". He probably never took his any place I can't go, weather permitting. But, he never took it 170 miles up the Koyukuk. His boat could sleep 6 or 7 for a few days if needed. No way I could do that. They are both good boats and the Sea Sport costs a lot more.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    I have owned the 26' Alaskan Sea Runner for 8 years. A friend of mine had a 27' Sea Sport for several years. I consider his boat a better "blue water ocean boat". He probably never took his any place I can't go, weather permitting. But, he never took it 170 miles up the Koyukuk. His boat could sleep 6 or 7 for a few days if needed. No way I could do that. They are both good boats and the Sea Sport costs a lot more.
    Having never been, I am amazed.
    You can run props that far up the Koyukyk?
    Dual motor set up on your Sea Runner?

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    I would tend to think that the glass boat would ride better in chop, but the downside would be that you can't beach it like you might with an aluminum boat. I am interesed in folks' imput as well since I am in the long process of saving up for and purchasing a boat in the seeminly endless distant future.
    Ask not what your government can do for you. Ask how your government can go away and get out of your life

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    "If someone were to tell me a 22' welded aluminum skiff would ride better than my 22' Sea Sport, I wouldnt have given them much credibility, but its true."
    Owned a Hewes before our Sea Sport. Difference in how they handle the seas is like the difference between driving a Lexus and a Yugo.
    Tennessee

  9. #9

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    We did own a Sea Sport around 1996 or so. It was a 22 footer or so. And now we have a 24 foot Hewes. Little different length. The sea sport was a lot faster cause we had a big engine in it. It hauled *****. The Hewes is not quite as fast but outboards are way easier to handle than an inboard. Now to the really bad stuff about sea sports. In our experience and friends experiences handling them, they are the roughest pieces of junk there is. Unless the water is completely flat like glass, it it will not be comfortable at all. Even little 2 foot waves will toss you around like no other. It was the same for our friends. If you use trim tabs which are really nice, will toss the boat around to. Also the boat we had was fiberglass, pain in ***** to take care of. I think its the same now with Sea Sport. For the inboard we had was a 350 chev. There wasn't even enough room to get an arm down the engine compartment to work on it. In the years we owned it we couldn't/didn't change oil filter on it. It was physically impossible. To do any work on it we had one arm pinched down with a mirror and trying to do work with the other one. Now to the 24 foot Hewes. Not quite as fast but very dependable. We went through 4-5 foot waves still on the step, barely felt one wave, just went through it. With the Hewes we have a 250 Yamaha with a 9.9 HT. and love it. Now Yamaha came out with the 350 and 300. so more power and still the same fuel efficiency with lower RPMS and higher speed. Check out the Yamaha spec. sheets on their website. They have done boat tests with all of their motors. From like 28ft north river, hewes, etc. With the Sea Sport you wouldn't have been able to even think about going out. I don't know if Sea Sport has changed their designs with them, but we still won't even get on one, let alone think of purchasing one. In my opinion the Hewes aluminum will be the better buy for sure. Raider makes a good boat. North River makes an incredible boat. Gulf Explorer makes a good boat to. This is my experience with them, and had both. Overall Hewes is better.

  10. #10

    Talking seasport better for my family

    Cant say much about hewescraft cause i dont have one but my seasport is a great boat. i have a small family who also like to get out on the water so being able to camp out comfortably onboard for the weekend was important fun factor. the seasport accomidations were a bit more plush than the hewes. in addition seasports seemed to hold value alot longer than the hewescraft. the utility functions of the hewes couldnt out weigh the functionality for my specific needs at the time of purchase this is one of the only reasons why i decide to go with seasport.......and they look better

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    For the price Hewes is a great boat. It does everything I ask it to do. I don't know much about the other boat so I can say anything. Are there better boats then Hewes? YES, but you will pay for it. As for me, I would not give up my Hewes...
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Default my analogies

    I own a 20' hewes sea runner.

    I've fished on 22' ocean pro and 24' Sea Sport and a 26' Sea Sport...

    Here's my take... I'm an analogy guy:

    I said it one other time in a post and it just seems to fit... The Hewes craft boat is like the pick up truck of the boats I see up here. There are much nicer boats out there but the Hewes is well built and gets the job done.

    The smaller 18-20' Hewes are like a 1/2 ton pick up. It will haul and pull loads decent but is not necessarily a Heavy Duty rig. They will take on more than they should.

    The 22 Hewes is like a 3/4 ton truck - better built to handle the work load.

    The 24-26 are like the 1 ton truck - You get the idea...

    The 22 Ocean Pro is a combo/hybrid... Like a 3/4 ton HEAVY DUTY. The OCEAN PRO handles the water very well and is very functional.

    Of course there are the Pacific Cruiser boats but that's another story...

    Now on to my opinion of the Sea Sport... Sea Sport seems (to ME) to be a much nicer boat. It's not just fiberglass vs. aluminum but that is a big part of it. The amenities seem nicer. Of course you pay for them as well...

    I guess in some ways the SS seems like the kind of pick up truck Peterbuilt would build. (if in fact they built pick-up trucks)...

    If you question is which handles the rough weather better - Here's how I answer that:

    If I were standing dock side during gale force winds and were going to steal a boat to set sail into open waters with... I'd choose Sea Sport. If I'm foot'n the bill for a boat to use 10-15 weekends a year I'd pick a Hewes everytime...

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I haven't ridden on either boat, so can't comment there. But the real question is, are you looking for a fishing boat, or a cruising boat?

    In general, the fiberglass boats are set up as cruising boats, comfortable for going out and just being on the water, and comfortable for sleeping on. You can fish on them, but they really aren't set up for that use.

    If on the other hand your main goal is to slather the deck with slime and blood, and you'll have cod sinkers bouncing around, you'll generally find the aluminum boats are better set up for that application.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I haven't ridden on either boat, so can't comment there. But the real question is, are you looking for a fishing boat, or a cruising boat?

    In general, the fiberglass boats are set up as cruising boats, comfortable for going out and just being on the water, and comfortable for sleeping on. You can fish on them, but they really aren't set up for that use.

    If on the other hand your main goal is to slather the deck with slime and blood, and you'll have cod sinkers bouncing around, you'll generally find the aluminum boats are better set up for that application.
    Lots of great info here, thanks everyone. Primarily we will be fishing and hunting, throwing out some pots as I learn about that. That will be the primary function but I enjoy "gunkholing" and just muking about with boats.
    I am not sure about sleeping on a boat this size? I have only done it once and that was a 25" sailboat in Florida years ago, a lot less gear required in a warm climate. I know these boats have some basic accommodations but I sure enjoyed the State cabin we stayed at in Tutka Bay last week. Its nice to sit by the fire in the evening or just have room to walk around and get off the boat for awhile. I would like a head on the boat, galley? I dont know? how much folks use them on a boat this size? .338 Mag mentioned his trip on the Yukon Koyukuk, something I had not considered. Living in the interior I like the idea I could use an aluminum boat to explore the Yukon, at least from the bridge down. Certainly could be done in a glass boat? but just doesnt sound like a good idea.
    Thanks for all info, keep it coming, John

  15. #15

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    I have been on SS and on Hewes during the boat show. I have been on an 19' sea sport back in the late 90's off of Kodiak and thought the ride was somewhat plush (smooth) but the weather was fairly nice. Haven't been on a Hewes yet on water. I have seen them out and they appear to do fine in the seas. Sure would be nice if you could link up with owners of each type to get a personal feel. Then after telling them your in the market you'll be pulling hairs.

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    Don't know what a 24 foot Hewes Ocean Pro costs but we paid less than $70k for our new 24 foot Sea Sport with a 496 ci - 375 hp inboard when we bought it new a few years ago. This price includes the Yamaha 10 HT kicker, rear helm station, macerator pump for the fish well and the triple axle trailer. Purchased the boat from AMDS before they dropped the Sea Sport line. Boat can carry 120 gallons of gas and 25 gallons of water. Cruising range with 3 adults on it is approximately 250 miles with a little reserve to insure we can make it back on the kicker if need be.
    We only camp on the boat once or twice a year if we are lucky and mostly use it to run out of Sewerd or Homer chasing butts. Easy to sleep three on the boat. Fish slime and blood wash off easily as it does from a metal boat. Carry a 10 foot dingy on the roof so I could care less about beaching it. We been caught in 6-8 foot seas and were able to stay on step. Never once did we feel like we were in any danger of getting swamped.
    Metal boat guys talk about polishing there boats or putting sharkhide on them. We wax our boat once a year and it takes about 8 hours and it looks as good as the day we bought it. Doesnt even get covered with tarps in the winter.
    Only problems to date have been with the outdrive, and only because it was not installed correctly and the bellows was cut allowing water to enter and the drive shafts had to be replaced. I change the oil in the motor once a year and it takes about an hour to pull the hoses so all the water drains out to winterize it.

    If I had the money I most likely would buy one of the following:
    Sea Wolf
    Bigger Sea Sport
    GC
    The bigger ocean boats that Wooldridge are building
    Hewes Craft
    In the order listed

    Nothing wrong with any of the boats listed above and many good brands of boats are not listed. Before anybody should buy a Ocean boat they should be spending a few weekends at Seward or Homer walking the docks and talking to owners. You absolutely do not want a heavy glass boat if you want to use it on the Yukon or Koyukuk. With the outdrive they draw to much water.
    Tennessee

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    If I had the money I most likely would buy one of the following:
    Sea Wolf
    Bigger Sea Sport
    GC
    The bigger ocean boats that Wooldridge are building
    Hewes Craft
    In the order listed

    Nothing wrong with any of the boats listed above and many good brands of boats are not listed. Before anybody should buy a Ocean boat they should be spending a few weekends at Seward or Homer walking the docks and talking to owners. You absolutely do not want a heavy glass boat if you want to use it on the Yukon or Koyukuk. With the outdrive they draw to much water.[/QUOTE

    Randy,
    Thanks for all the input, I did notice the salt got after my "raw" aluminum river boat rather quickly, and that was only a weeks time. I like the idea of not having a OB hanging off the back, but wonder how the servicability is on a big V-8 under the deck? Do you still have room for a fish box? Do you have a slip or pull the boat in & out? On a weekend trip I presume you would still sleep on the boat in the Harbor? Sorry for all the questions, its just a lot to consider. I wanted to walk the docks last week but because we stayed at Tutka never got a chance. I would sure like to buy new.....but most likely will decide what I want and then....Wait........for the right deal. John

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    We trailer the boat and it has two fish boxes. One directly in front of the inboard V8 and the other just behind the cabin door. One we use for wet storage and the other is the width of the boat and about 2 feet wide and at least 2 feet deep. It would hold at least 1,000 pounds of fish (that is not a misprint).
    As far as working on the motor the oil filter is up near the top as are the fuel filters. Oil is pumped out when you change it. The 496 does take up more room than the standard 350 motor.
    I have no strong feelings about either inboards or outboards. Could live with either one. But the heater and defroster sure is nice when you are running.

    When we run to Homer we sleep on the boat before we launch the next morning. Vee berth can sleep two adults and the table converts to another bed. We did remove the porta pottie as we all decided it is easier just to use a bucket.
    Tennessee

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    One important fact (at least to me down in S.E.) is that the Hewes are not self bailing boats. I think Hewes really dropped the ball on that one.
    If you have never had it, then you wont be dissapointed.

    Oz

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtyoz View Post
    One important fact (at least to me down in S.E.) is that the Hewes are not self bailing boats. I think Hewes really dropped the ball on that one.
    If you have never had it, then you wont be dissapointed.

    Oz
    Could you elaborate on that? I am a new Hewescraft owner (26' Alaskan) and I kind of know what you are talking about, but what are the downsides to a non-self bailing boat?

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