Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Rust Bluing

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4

    Default Rust Bluing

    I have a 1976 Citori that needs to be re-blued. I have been told that I am unable to hot blue it because of the cold solder. Rust bluing was suggested to me and I was curious if anybody in Alaska, Anchorage area, rust blues?

    Kirt

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kdog View Post
    I have a 1976 Citori that needs to be re-blued. I have been told that I am unable to hot blue it because of the cold solder. Rust bluing was suggested to me and I was curious if anybody in Alaska, Anchorage area, rust blues?

    Kirt
    I'm not sure if anyone does it, but rust bluing is one of those things that works very well at home if you pay attention to detail. I'll NEVER cold blue again with any product after trying rust bluing. I use Laurel Mountain Forge Barrel Brown and Degreaser. I've used it for years to brown muzzleloaders and finally got around to trying it for rust bluing. What great uniform results. And in my experience, the results are a lot tougher than hot bluing. Here is the instruction sheet for rust bluing. Scroll down to the bottom half of the page. One little bottle is plenty for doing a couple of guns at least.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    In an easy chair in Cyberspace
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    Send it to Browning

  4. #4
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    I have done it a bunch and it's a very durable finish. A true rust blue or brown takes a heck of a lot of work to do a good job and you need a worm box to do the rusting in. Not many smiths do it because it’s a lot of work and like true case hardening you don’t know how it will look till it’s done. Sometimes I re-rust them a couple times before I’m happy with the look but the actual rusting is easy once all the other prep is done. I can send you a copy of my instructions if you want to take it on but I don’t know of anyone to do it for you, it’s more a labor of love than a profit maker.

    There are some good paint on type finishes now days that cover different metals and stay same color no matter what is under it. I don’t know much about them but I think that is the direction you should be looking unless you want to do your own rust brown job.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  5. #5
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I'm not sure if anyone does it, but rust bluing is one of those things that works very well at home if you pay attention to detail. I'll NEVER cold blue again with any product after trying rust bluing. I use Laurel Mountain Forge Barrel Brown and Degreaser. I've used it for years to brown muzzleloaders and finally got around to trying it for rust bluing. What great uniform results. And in my experience, the results are a lot tougher than hot bluing. Here is the instruction sheet for rust bluing. Scroll down to the bottom half of the page. One little bottle is plenty for doing a couple of guns at least.
    BrownBear, that stuff sounds like it could be a good way to go also. I love that it works through oil, finger print oil and spillage from the oil protecting the bore is the biggest pain of the true rust browning process. Do you have any pix of what it looks like when done?
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    BrownBear, that stuff sounds like it could be a good way to go also. I love that it works through oil, finger print oil and spillage from the oil protecting the bore is the biggest pain of the true rust browning process. Do you have any pix of what it looks like when done?
    I've only got one photo of browning and none of the rust bluing, but I'll attach it. Not real closeup, but you can get a glimpse. It's a refinish of an existing gun. Slick and easy, and like you say, tough as nails. For the bore, I just shove a cork in the muzzle and another in the socket for the nipple to brown muzzleloaders, and for the lever action I rust blued, I just shoved a cork in each end.

    After my first attempt to brown, I decided I wanted more humidity for a faster, more even job. I built a 4x1x1 sweat box from plywood and wired in a light socket and 60 watt bulb at one end. Added a wet towel and hung the barrel in there. Really fast and uniform browning. Probably had half an hour in building the box and $5 in hardware.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Posts
    448

    Default

    I do German rust bluing for several of the Montana custom rifle builders. It is not difficult but is time consuming. I do the rusting in the room that contains my well head; the humidity in there is usually high enough to do a reasonable job. I use my own concoction or Pilkington's (from Brownell's); both work about the same. I get a great deal of satisfaction from doing a quality job and this is one of those things that with patience, you will not have to take a back seat to anyone. Good luck and have fun. J.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Thanks for the input, I will be downloading the instructions as soon as the in-laws leave. It will be something challenging and rewarding. Maybe a winter project.

    Kirt

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kdog View Post
    Thanks for the input, I will be downloading the instructions as soon as the in-laws leave. It will be something challenging and rewarding. Maybe a winter project.

    Kirt
    One bit of advice. In my experience, on refinishes it pays to get off every last speck of original bluing before proceeding. You can use naval jelly for the first pass, which removes it down to a dull grey. Follow that with a careful light polish to get it down to bare white metal. After that it goes like a dream, but if there's any original bluing left you'll have trouble getting the LMF solution to work in that spot.

    I think you'll enjoy the project and really appreciate the results!

  10. #10
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,602

    Default

    Remember that rust blueing gives more of a matt finish which I like better anyway

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Where can you get Pilkingtons or Laural Mt? No one will ship it and I can't find a local supplier.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moosenuggets View Post
    Where can you get Pilkingtons or Laural Mt? No one will ship it and I can't find a local supplier.
    I think Pilkingtons comes from Brownels, and they're kinda starchy about shipping liquids to Alaska. I get my Laurel Mountain Forge from Track of the Wolf with no problems. LMF is basically an organic soap solution so there shouldn't be any trouble from anyone, but some of the companies have their heads in dark places.

  13. #13
    Member aknewbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ft. Richardson
    Posts
    175

    Default Other ideas......

    Kdog, check out this link, http://beartoothbullets.com/tech_not...h_notes.htm/58 It isnt nescessarily about browning but may give you a few ideas. If not it is a good read anyways. Hope it helps!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •