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Thread: Flounder off the Spit: edible?

  1. #1

    Default Flounder off the Spit: edible?

    I was screwing around on the Spit yesterday and hooked some flounders. I also caught some pollack (I think) that I gave to the people next to me.

    The question is, does anyone here eat these flounders? The reason I ask is that they were the stinkiest fish I have ever cleaned. Like, some unholy awful smell. It wasn't so much a fishy smell as an awful trash sort of thing. (Oddly, my wife said they didn't smell bad to her and that they just reminded her of the ocean). I used to surf cast for stripers out east and caught some crazy stuff, but nothing that smelled like this.

    So yeah, I am probably being a wimp or something, but I have some serious doubt about the fillets I have in my fridge. Do you guys eat these? Should I eat these? Or should I put them in the garden?

    Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default

    Those are usually yellowfin sole out there off the spit. I've caught and eaten some. Can't remember them smelling bad, but the flesh was ok, a bit on the mushy side, but definitely edible. Lot's of folks take home bucketloads of them, and there's also a commercial fishery for them in the Bering Sea and perhaps elsewhere. The pollock and cod I've caught there were practically swimming with worms, and I tossed the couple I began to fillet.
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

  3. #3

    Default

    Yeah, I suspected that about the pollack. Didn't really see any in the sole/flounder though.

    Thanks for info.

  4. #4

    Default arrowtooth flounder

    most those at the split are arrowtooth flounder.I have heard you need to cook arrowtooth flounder after you catch .I had some frozen from publix that turned to mush when fried after being frozen

  5. #5

    Default

    I've fished there probably 10 times and never seen an arrowtooth....I suppose you might catch one casting way out for halibut, but all the flatfish I've seen caught a little closer to shore, usually between shore and the large pylons, has been a yellowfin sole. Homerdave says there are some rock sole there as well. I've done fish ID as a part of my job before, and yellowfin sole are unmistakable, as would be an arrowtooth in comparison. If you know your fish ID and have caught arrowtooth there, I'm not arguing, just offering my own experience.

    http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/species/Arr...h_flounder.php
    http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/species/yellowfin_sole.php

    Mouth size, body shape, etc, clearly distinguish the two. YF sole also have a black line that runs around the perimeter of their body, which sets off the yellowish color of the fins.
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

  6. #6

    Default And some people eat ---

    sure they are safe to eat, but then again some people eat sea cucumbers.

    They where catching small 20 to 30 pound halibut off the beach at Deep creep, even a king or two.

    june 1976 a 196# halibut was caught off the end of the spit from shore!

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskapiranha View Post
    They where catching small 20 to 30 pound halibut off the beach at Deep creep, even a king or two.
    Recently?

    Like this month?
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

  8. #8
    Member AKShawn's Avatar
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    Default

    Yeah, I am intersted too.
    AKShawn

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