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Thread: Non Resident Hunting Regs

  1. #1

    Default Non Resident Hunting Regs

    Can anyone answer this for me. As a Non-Resident Alien Hunter do I have to hunt with my guide. More specificallly, are we to hunt shoulder to shoulder or can we be seperated by say 1-5 miles with or without radio contact. Thanks

  2. #2

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    It says you have to be accompanied in the field by an Alaska licensed guide, so my interpretation of that means he has to be with you at all times. I'd call F&G and get the clarification from them, make sure you get the persons name too. And you are not allowed to use radios while hunting either.

  3. #3
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default together...not sep

    A non-res alien is to be "accompanied" by the licensed contracting registered/master guide-outfitter, or a licensed assitant (assistant/registered/master guide) working under the contracting guide-outfitter. A contract must exist and the contracting guide-outfitter must be legally licensed, insured and permitted.

    The non-res alien hunter is to be "more shoulder-to-shoulder", as you described it. A mile away, for more than a very brief period ot time, will never meet the legal reguiement. If the non-res-alien client gets injured or dead, while hunting seperate from the licensed guide, then that alien-client or the surviving spouse will become quite wealthy. If that non-res-alien-client is visited by Mr. Trooper, then Mr. Contracting Guide-Outfitter will get the opportunity to explain the space-seperation in court 9...(and will lose).

    AK F&G will probably not answer that question, because they do not enforce wildlife or guide laws. They will refer you to an AK State Trooper, with wildlife law enforcement experience.

    Hope this helps...

    Dennis
    AK TAGS

  4. #4

    Default Non - Resident regs

    Thanks for the replies. I'll assume that all day would exceed the "for a brief moment" you describe? Your comments regarding radios', would that include marine channel emergency response radios? Also do you know what the regs say regarding the carrying of firearms on an A.T.V.? Also, hunitng hours, I have been told that the "legal" hunitng time is, IF YOU CAN SEE IT YOU CAN SHOOT IT? Is that true? Usually it is from 1/2 hr before and after sunrise/sunset? Thanks again.
    Last edited by mcreg; 05-22-2009 at 14:39. Reason: added question

  5. #5
    Member AK6Pack's Avatar
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    Default

    You can use radios as long as you do NOT use them in the aid of taking an animal. For safety reasons or communicating with a base camp radios are fine.
    You are also allowed to have firearms on ATVs.

  6. #6

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    Thanks< do you know if the firearms can be loaded?. the last thing I want is to meet a bear on the trail and have to load my gun while he's charging!

  7. #7

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    Time to go to your local sporting goods store or license vendor or ADF&G - get a copy of the current regulations and READ THEM (a bunch of times.)
    Your questions seem to be far beyond the range of general clarification.
    Good Luck
    Joe (Ak)
    Quote Originally Posted by mcreg View Post
    Thanks< do you know if the firearms can be loaded?. the last thing I want is to meet a bear on the trail and have to load my gun while he's charging!

  8. #8
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Default

    AK does not have the firearms laws of other states in the US. Loaded guns in cars, boats, personal planes, and ATVs.

    You need to read the standard hunting regs in the front of the booklet that apply to everyone, not just NR aliens.

    Back in college days my best friends relatives came up from the midwest to go moose hunting with his dad and us. They walked around all day with their gun cases hanging over one shoulder because we were on a "road" to get to the trail. Back home they have to have the gun cased when on a road whether or not they are in a car. My friend and I loaded our rifles and walked off into the brush leaving them to fumble with their cases and un loaded rifles on the atv trail. By the end of the day they stopped "Feeling Minnesota" and got to hunting.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    Time to go to your local sporting goods store or license vendor or ADF&G - get a copy of the current regulations and READ THEM (a bunch of times.)
    Your questions seem to be far beyond the range of general clarification.
    Good Luck
    Joe (Ak)
    RIGHT.
    You need to take your chances on understanding them, just like the rest of us.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  10. #10
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Here's a link...

    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    RIGHT.
    You need to take your chances on understanding them, just like the rest of us. Smitty of the North
    - "...and read them very carefully" --Tony Russ.
    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...ations.hunting

    Mcreg: A lot of experience in the posted advice here. Does your guide think "...1-5 miles" is OK? I'm brand new at this myself, but that doesn't sound right. Plus, the use of a radio, while permitted for safety, is not permitted "...to aid in taking of game" (pg 17, 2008-2009 Ak hunt Regs).

    In one of our first guided outings here, two wildlife officers stopped our boat just to check license/documents. I was impressed by how one guy approached our guide, while the other maintained separation and behind cover. We were fishing instead of hunting, and maybe the appearance of felony-stop tactics was just my perception, but these guys struck me as quite serious; professional and courteous but there on business. Of the several ways to mess up a hunting trip, meeting wildlife officers if you have a problem has got to be one of the best. Depending on your experience level, besides reading the regs carefully, you could actually take online Basic Hunter Ed. Unless you take the exam, I think there's no charge. If you're not planning to quailify (target qualification), you don't have to take the exam. Link: http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...dfg=he.fdbasic

    Game animals/behavior and Alaska terrain/weather conditions surprise a lot of people. Seems like having a guide close by advising you about regs, recognizing hazards (that brown bump in the tundra ahead), shot selection (a friend passed on a good shot on a brown bear because his experienced partner pointed out the bear was standing on a small rise that would make visually tracking the bear difficult if the bear fell backward and could still walk) would be valuable, even necessary to avoid other kinds of problems too.

    Best wishes on your planned hunt.

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