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Thread: Seeking to join hunt parties

  1. #1
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    Default Seeking to join hunt parties

    Postgraduate student from Queens University Belfast (Northern Ireland) studying hunter emotions in Alaska seeks to join hunts. Willing to pay my own way and able and willing to help where I can. If you are interested reply to this message or email me on pmccreary01@qub.ac.uk

  2. #2

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    That's an interesting topic of study. Who is funding the project and why? Why Alaskan hunters?

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    Study is not funded by any organisation or group, though my postgraduate programme is supported by an educational body in the UK. I came to Alaska three years ago to carry out what I now think of as a pilot project for this study, primarily because my sister lives here.

    A little bit of info on me: I'm 44-year-old guy, 5'10'', slim build, well used to outdoor life through extensive mountain hiking, been on three hunts across Alaska during my previous stay in 2006.
    Last edited by Pmac; 05-20-2009 at 23:09. Reason: Add more detail

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    So, Your in Alaska now?

    How long you got?
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Just arrived and am staying in Anchorage with sister, probably moving on to Fairbanks next week. Will be in Alaska until May next year.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default pm coming your way

    Quote Originally Posted by Pmac View Post
    Just arrived and am staying in Anchorage with sister, probably moving on to Fairbanks next week. Will be in Alaska until May next year.
    Check your pm box; got a note headed your way. Let's talk!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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    Default Good guy

    Pmac tagged along with me on a couple of hunts back in 2006 and I can vouch for him. He's a fine fellow, very easy to talk to and I thoroughly enjoyed his company. His interest in Alaska hunting culture is genuine and open minded. I read some of his academic work a year or so later and found it to be insightful.

  8. #8
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Interesting, is the goal to follow sport hunters or subsistence hunters? Or perhaps both and do a comparison? I hunt for food but I won't starve if I don't connect. I prefer wild game meat to store bought for it's taste and health bennefits and I enjoy hunting! Then there are people like Strangerinastrangeland that pretty much get all of their meat off of the land.

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    Do you have access to a 4 wheeler and have you sheep hunted before?

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    The ideal is to learn how sports hunters and subsistence peoples differently experience hunting, although my main focus - at this stage at least - is on the emotions felt by sports hunters. The direction my study takes depends almost entirely on how people respond to my efforts at engaging with hunters.

    It might be possible for me to get the loan of a four wheeler. I rode one at Point MacKenzie and Nabesna in 06. No, I've never been on a sheep hunt. I'm really interested in why you asked that AKHunter45.....

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    Default Links to your works/publications?

    Any links/references you can provide to some of your works or publications?

  12. #12

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    I asked because I might be going on a sheep hunt with a friend and we are using atv's, nothing set in stone yet as I am waiting for him to decide.

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    I've nothing published as yet, though i'm happy for some people to read my previous dissertation on Alaskan hunting and my current research proposal, which give a clear indication of my perspective. These things best arranged and trust established face-to-face.

    Keep me posted on sheep hunt....

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    Appears to be a worthwhile study...I will, in the name of science give you one of my emotions on the subject:
    I'm by no means politically correct...but in the world stage of public opinion, I don't like to be referred to as a sport hunter. To joe public, a sport hunter has the same connotation as any other sport. To me (and most other hunters I know), hunting is a way of life, not a sport. Of course we could all "live" without hunting in today's world. Even the "subsistence hunters".

    Yes, for some reason I do enjoy getting out in the fowlest of weather to hunt, I don't know why, other than it's instinct that was instilled in me over thousands of years. I'm as much a subsistence hunter as anyone else in Alaska...we all eat what we harvest. The fact that I live where I can find work does, but shouldn't separate me from any other peoples. My ancestors were subsistence hunting as long as anyone else's...maybe longer. "Subsistence" has become an all-encompassing moniker that means free money and special privledges. It's big business and makes a lot of people a lot of money.

    I've read a number of posts from people living in rural areas...and us weekend warriors get hacked on because we live where we can work and support our families the best we can, and in many ways, help support their families. Those that live in rural areas say "well, if you want special privileges, move to the rural areas. You can't work and get special rights too". Which in itself is an bragging about special priviledges, but even moreso, very telling of what's broke with today's system. We reward mediocrity...and worse yet, lack of responsibility. But...."when the government robs Peter to pay Paul...you can always count on the support of Paul"-GB Shaw.

  15. #15

    Default hunting perspectives

    Pmac, have you considered the insights that might be gained by a full on participatory study design? As most everyone on here will attest, it is a completely different thing to do rather than watch.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    I met with Paul the other day and he seems genuine. He's been on some big-game hunts up here already and knows a bit about what happens up here. If any of you guys journal your thoughts on a hunt and can hook up with him, that would be a welcome thing. He looks like he is capable of carrying his load in the field, and I don't believe he would be a burden to anyone at all.

    For me hunting, especially hunting alone, is an intensely personal thing. But I would not mind sharing my thoughts about it with someone like this. It's an interesting study and I hope some of you can participate.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  17. #17
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    "Subsistance is a poor word for a great way of life"
    ....someone said that I dont know who, but its a very descriptive phrase.
    I dont know how folks go with that word.....(Didnt Bill Clinton get a Moniker??)

    Maby because it rymes with subsidise or any other word beginning with "Sub', which to me means "lesser than" in most situations.
    Even I'm not too hot about the word, and some have said some far out stuff when I tell them how we make a lving.
    Yep.... Your a subsistance Hunter AK DUX, and I dont assume you are unemployed

    "well, if you want special privileges, move to the rural areas. You can't work and get special rights too"
    .....is about the only thing that I dont agree with.

    Subsistance in no way means unemployed.

    Most guys I know that are Subsistance Hunters have jobs.

    Even if your a full time Hunter, Its a lotta work as you know, and the more successful you are, the more work you have to do.

    Now dont confuse a Subsistance hunter with a foodstamp shopping bargin hunter.....~~LOL!!~~

    Fodstamps = store food.....subsistance hunting =Food and a whole LOT more, as noted, and food stamps are usless to people who hunt/gather/fish to eat wild foods.

    I bet 1/2 the guys reading this are job holding Subsisitance Hunters, and wont admit it!!! ~~LOL!!!~~~ Shoot , eat it, subsist.....

    Some guys only get to hunt on wek ends.
    Alot of guys work part time and fill in the lost hours by hunting and gathering wood, to avoid the costs of store food and heating oil.
    Subsistance hunters here in the villages are just like guys in any city, and vice versa. Some are weekend hunters, and some are seasonal workers, and a vast majority work two-three weeks somewhere (oilfeilds/mines, ect) and do two-three weeks at home.

    Few people do it full time...Gathering/fishing/hunting and none of them are lazy.
    Its alot of work to pack water, cut wood, hunt, fish ,watch kids, gather and keep things repaird, clean and in order.

    My wife is an artist. She has a business license and pays tax's, and is very much self-employed, and we manage on our own.
    The hunting/fishing/gathering is a stedy income for us. It fluctates with the economy and markets and we have our times at it.
    Subsistance hunting requires $$ for gas, ammo, clothing and transpo.
    We make our money with artwork from byproducts such as horns, bones antlers and skins, some people do it with the fish themselfs, some people live from $$$ with furs.
    Hunting IS big business, and Guides are making a living from this land as we do, though indirectly through money.
    Money is a nessessity right up there with Coffee and toilet paper.


    I agree as well , that medeocrity is rewarded, and its like an addicting drug.
    People on foodstamps and getting free stuff wont lift a finger.......The ones that eat the pop and chips are mostly not hunting for food, or much else more than whats on TV....
    These folks rarely hunt,or own/maintain a vehicle to hunt with, and most are on drugs/alcohol and cant hunt because their probation officer wont let them outta sight.

    I have alot of friends that fly up in season from Anchorage and Fairbanks and hunt for a couple weeks, as residents catching their winters meat.
    I think this is rather typical, and I see the same faces almost every Fall, in Kotzebue.

    My concept, as a subsistance hunter, of a "Sports hunter" is a guy with a southern accent,in September at the airport, in Realtree cammo gear with a .338 mag looking for "My Caribou" and offering the pilot an extra 500$ to forget about the fog and take off anyway....
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  18. #18
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Default Hunter

    Good on ya!!

  19. #19
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    Default Sure have a way w/words

    Stranger~ man, you captured the intent here. Many of you all have chimed in and I like the concept of this post. The only thing or problem I see, is why are the Irish doing what fellow Americans need to do? I applaud Pmac's efforts, too bad some American college's can't do the same...

    Like Michael Strahan said, it is a personal vendetta while "Sport Hunting."
    As humans, we ARE the top predator. Centuries of hunting have culminated and condensed into what our forefathers taught us about hunting. Surely "hunting" began as the only way to get a meat source, that protein punch needed to grow big brains to use tools and become the modern humans we are. Now, fast forward a few hundred years... We have grocery stores, and for the most of us, modern accomodations. This is where the subsistenance hunter and sport hunter part ways. Subsistenance hunters have a valid need to support their very existance, whereas sport hunters do it because they are privledged to do so. I do not "need" to hunt, I do so like many others who replied. Not to get off subject, I do think the terminology "subsistenance" is wrongly utilized. Here's my rationale: If you lived deep in the wilderness, and in order to survive needed to "live off the land," Why are the regs even applicable? Charecterization of who gets to hunt what, where, why & how; is yet another step-in to manage/provide oversight for subsistenance hunting. Sport hunting is also a mis-managed term. I'd like to think of myself as a subsistenance hunter for I persue wild critters to help make ends meet/offset my expenses (and I love to eat 'em too! )

    The sport hunter, IMO, is the filthy rich guy/gal whom flies in with the term trophy on his/her mind. They may eat what they kill, but from my viewpoint, it is the trophy that is the lure. Surely some could be happy with an inferior sized mount, but it may be a trophy in their eyes.

    I hunt for food, for it captures the intent of my existance. The thrill of the chase, the spot & stalk and the smell/taste of fresh meat cooked over an open flame, mmmm mm! It's also a lot of work, costs money to persue the game (unless you walk) & outfit yourself properly. Bottom line, we ALL pay to hunt, subsitenance or not.

    My 2 cents...
    Respect what you do not own but are privleged to enjoy, Mother Earth thanks you...

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