Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Weighting Shrimp Pots

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    198

    Default Weighting Shrimp Pots

    I lost a pot last weekend and suspect it was because it got too deep and simply floated away during an over night soak. When I dropped my pots, the depth finder said I was at 450'; however, when I started picking them up the next day, I found them at 550'. Each pot has 600' of line. The area I was in had a fairly steep decent down to over 1000'.

    It's pretty easy for me to understand how an unweighted pot can drift a fair amount as it sinks; so, I was thinking that if I put some weight in my pots they will sink faster and drift less on their way down.

    My pots are the round nesting type with netting material around the frame. I've considered just putting a brick in the pot but I don't want to damage the netting material of the pot.

    How do you guys handle the issue?

  2. #2

    Default

    Mushroom anchor on the end of the line.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    712

    Default

    Rebar, wired or zip-tied to the bottom frame hoop. 10 extra lbs, minimum...

  4. #4

    Default

    Short pieces of old 3/8" chain zip tied to the bottom of the pot works for me. I try to get 7 to 10 pounds in each pot. I'll bet it still takes 10 minutes for the pot to reach the bottom when trying to get down 500ft.

  5. #5
    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    I put lead weights in all of my pots, not cheap but works. I also don't set one pot at a time. From my bouy to the first pot is the 600' of line, from that pot to the next is a 50' line. I set 2 strings this way, one with 2 pots and the other with 3 pots and 2-50' lines between them all. When setting the pots I start deap and head towards shore so the shallowest pot has the main line attached. Haven't had a problem yet. My only concern with rebarr is it rusting and making a mess, not sure if anyone has had an issue with that though.

    If you've seen the Pot builders pots (of course different that yours) he has what looks like concrete poored into each end of his pots so they are heavy. Then again everyone doesn't have a puller capable of pulling the way he does.

  6. #6
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    637

    Default

    I usually attach five or six halibut weights around the bottom perimeter of each pot, and have my pots set up 2/3 - two on one string, three on another. I've not had problems with my post moving so far, but I try to set in no more than 500' . . .

    Cheers,

    SH

  7. #7
    Member garnede's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    soon to be back in Alaska
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKBighorn View Post
    My only concern with rebarr is it rusting and making a mess, not sure if anyone has had an issue with that though.
    If you are concerned about rust you could use some marine grade epoxy paint on them.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,117

    Default Anything to get it down will work.

    We also use chain and or halibut weights all zip tied to the bottom and set our pots just like Akbighorn does and have not had any problems with the pots drifting. We are using Potbuilders rectangular collapsable models and they work excellent.
    BK

  9. #9
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Boater View Post
    I lost a pot last weekend and suspect it was because it got too deep and simply floated away during an over night soak. When I dropped my pots, the depth finder said I was at 450'; however, when I started picking them up the next day, I found them at 550'. Each pot has 600' of line. The area I was in had a fairly steep decent down to over 1000'.

    It's pretty easy for me to understand how an unweighted pot can drift a fair amount as it sinks; so, I was thinking that if I put some weight in my pots they will sink faster and drift less on their way down.

    My pots are the round nesting type with netting material around the frame. I've considered just putting a brick in the pot but I don't want to damage the netting material of the pot.

    How do you guys handle the issue?
    OK here we go First of all you've got to realize that those webbed pots will want to kite in the current as they sink, thats because the webbing sort of wants to float and where its all puckered on the bottom acts as lets say are drift anchor. If you put a brick in you'll need to tie it in so it doesn't roll over to one side of the pot while it sinks and won't fish very well if at all. Also remember that cement isn't as heavy under water as it is on land. If it were me i'd tie in some steel ("steel is real" ) on each side of the pot and/or bend another hoop out of steel and lace it to the bottom of the pot or get rid of those kites and get some wire gear(pots) they sink fast(with added weight) and stay put on the bottom.
    Yup i do have concrete runners on my pots and they are heavy but i'm going to add at least another runner or two to them to make them even heavier. You can't make them too heavy

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  10. #10
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKBighorn View Post
    I put lead weights in all of my pots, not cheap but works. I also don't set one pot at a time. From my bouy to the first pot is the 600' of line, from that pot to the next is a 50' line. I set 2 strings this way, one with 2 pots and the other with 3 pots and 2-50' lines between them all. When setting the pots I start deap and head towards shore so the shallowest pot has the main line attached. Haven't had a problem yet. My only concern with rebarr is it rusting and making a mess, not sure if anyone has had an issue with that though.

    If you've seen the Pot builders pots (of course different that yours) he has what looks like concrete poored into each end of his pots so they are heavy. Then again everyone doesn't have a puller capable of pulling the way he does.
    JR,
    Get some oxsilic acid (wood bleach powder) at a paint store and mix it up in some water, use a sponge to put it on the rust and watch the stain disappear. Isn't the green colored rebar vinyl coated? then all you'd have to do is coat the ends with some plasti-dip to seal them up.

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •