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Thread: how to tow a canoe behind a 19' Grumman?

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up how to tow a canoe behind a 19' Grumman?

    I'd like to tow a light canoe behind my 19 footer next moose season ... to carry into ponds off the river.... Have any of you done this?...how far did you tow it behind the motor and how did you hitch it to the Grumman? Any suggestions appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default

    Rick, the towed canoe tends to get squirrely at times when you're under power, and can really mess you up when it decides to nose dive off to one side or the other. I've found it better to make the two into a catamaran by tying two poles across the thwarts of both canoes, side by side, leaving a good foot between the two so the waves don't splash in.

    Mark

  3. #3
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default swim skilak lake

    I set some Canoes off in Skilak lake a couple of years ago and watched the families paddle towards the River out to the south west. A well meaning boat pulled along side the canoes and they tied the canoe bows to the power boat. I was yelling for All I was worth, but they were a full half mile from the dock.
    In just a minute both canoes did just like Bushrat said,, got really funking, diving the nose into the lake and then they go swimming.
    I waited for the well meaning people in the boat to rescue the Group and put them in his power boat. he righted the canoes, and for some reason supposed without any weight in them they would magically tow along nicely..
    he sunk them again..
    finally when they got to the dock, I put the women and children in the warm car and then showed the boat operator how to tow a canoe.
    you pull along side the boat and hang on to the boats gunwhales. you can go pretty good this way until your get tired of hanging on to the side of the boat, but at least its very stable.
    I have towed a canoe by wrapping a rope around the front end of the canoe and making a bite on the keel line and then to the power boat. this way the canoe is pulled from the lowest part of the front of the canoe and it tows along at slow speeds quite nicely..
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  4. #4

    Default towing a canoe

    Alaskacanoe has the solution. QT(I have towed a canoe by wrapping a rope around the front end of the canoe and making a bite on the keel line and then to the power boat. this way the canoe is pulled from the lowest part of the front of the canoe and it tows along at slow speeds quite nicely..)QT
    The first time I tried to tow a canoe I tied to the bow ring. It "walked the dog" at almost any speed and even tried to pass me once. Fortunately a guy that was a lot smarter than me told me how to attach the lines. I tied a short line to the fwd thwarts on either side so the loop came almost to the bow. Tie a small loop in the center that will ride behind and below the bow, under the canoe, when the large loop is tight. Fasten your tow rope to the small loop so the tow rope is pulling the bow of the canoe up instead of down. Keep the towed canoe empty and it should trail real well. Watch the turns though. If you are going too fast the towed canoe will swing wide. I've tried this same configuration on a couple of jon boats and it worked on them too.

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    Default towing

    canoes aren't made for towing hydraulically speaking. With a powerboat, you're best off pulling them aboard. With another canoe, Bushrat had the best idea, making a catamaran of the two.

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    Thumbs up towing...

    Thanks for the info, guys....The catamarran method looks great where there's adequate room...however, on my favorite river, there's a stretch of some miles I call "the Maze" - full of obstacles - that I cut my way thru on the initial passage each season. The light canoe will have to be towed thru there...and now I have a game plan on how to....
    Again, thanks guys.

  7. #7
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Correct

    Godevilalaska is correct. To tow a canoe you have to loop the rope around the bow 2-3 feet back and pull from the bottom. It does work but remember that you ar not going to go 20 knots doing so.
    "Never again shall one generation of Veterans abandon another".
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