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Thread: Trip Gun-camping,hiking

  1. #1

    Default Trip Gun-camping,hiking

    As summer is approaching I am ready to set foot again on some terrain and enjoy the weather. I plan on going on several road trips, camping, boating, and hiking throughout Alaska. I am wanting to get a decent rifle less than $500.

    I am wanting a Marlin 45/70,30/30,or 30-06.

    I do not own any rifles yet, and this would be pretty much the first one I have shot in several years. I am wondering if the 45/70 and 06 would be too much to start out with, recoil wise. I would be carrying the gun for protection, and also plinking.

    I want a scope. I know the 30-30 can come with one but I don't know if that can carry enough to offern any protection if needed.

    What are your opinions? Thank you..

  2. #2
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    45-70 is the way to go for a protection rifle and to me they don't kick any more that a well loaded 30-30. 30-06 is a great hunting round but I don't think it fits with what you are looking for as well as a 45-70. 30-30 is also a great round but you had better be good with it to use it for protection in Alaska.
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  3. #3

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    oh really?? Okay, well I don't want to be scared to shoot it everytime, especially when I want to use it at the range..

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    AD is right AGAIN. Well, pretty much, but what do I know?

    A Marlin Guide Gun in 45-70 is probably your best bet of the ones you mention.

    The recoil shouldn't be a problem IF, you shoot the standard loads, and NOT the powerful ones that aficionados of the above are prone to use, and recommend. They're the ones you see at the range, with the grimaces on their faces.

    I'm of this opinion because I usta have a 45-70 Trapdoor Springfield Carbine. The recoil wasn't much since I only shot the 405 grain Factory Loads.

    BESIDES, if you don't like it, you can easily find someone who does, to sell it to.

    I think that Proud American needs one pretty bad.

    Smitty of the North
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    Sounds like you haven't been doing much shooting. There's alot of difference in the firearms you're considering, so you might want to narrow things down before you buy. Suggest you take your .22 or something and go out to the range at Birchwood or Rabbit Creek on a nice morning and see what others are shooting. Most shooters are glad to talk about their firearms, what they like, etc. I've had a number of them offer to let me shoot theirs and I've learned something from just about everyone I've talked to.

  6. #6
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    I agree with Smitty and AD. I would (and have) gone with the 45/70 for the camping, hiking gun. for me, the size, weight and comfort of carry are more important than power.

    I actually have several rifles in each chambering that you reference. and at least one of each that is set up as a hiking, camping kind of thing. As such, I prefer shorter barrels, with none of mine being longer than 18" and that is my Remington 7600 carbine in 30-06 (the only one that wears a scope). My 45/70 is a Marlin guide gun that has been shortened to 16" and my camping, hiking 30-30 is a Winchester 94 trapper that also has a 16" barrel.

    my suggestion would be to find a rifle that is easy to carry and shoot. Chambering is really seccondary to that. Afterall, if it isnt easy to cary around, it will end up being left in the truck, and then it really doesnt matter whether its a 458 Lott, a .22 long rifle, or a clay brick...... because they will all be equally worthless unless you have your hands on it when you need it!
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  7. #7

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    Alright, thanks for all of the tips. I think the 45/70 would be a good choice, so I would have that edge of power when needed. Is that gun pretty comfortable and fairly easy to handle while hiking and such?

    I have not gone shooting much, I don't have a rifle, just a pellet rifle, I have handguns though-and have only shot a handful of rifles before.

    If i can get a smaller load just to practice with, I think it would be a good choice. It is more expensive then the 30-30 though so if anyones selling a used one let me know! Thanks

  8. #8
    Member Hope and Change my *'s Avatar
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    Save you money on a scope. Just get to know the limits of the iron sights on the marlin. Thats all I have for mine. Save your scope ambitions for something when and if you ever want a hunting rifle and want to shoot game across canyons. The Guide gun is about the best choice you can have for hiking, trekking, camping. Its very compact and quick to maneuver. Unless your a proud american.

  9. #9

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    the 1894, 44 magnum, is supposedly less recoil then the 45-70 and I have read good reviews about that in other posts..

    any opinions comparing the 1894?

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    44 Mag compares poorly with a hot 45-70 load. For what you want, I would suggest thinking about the Marlin Guide Gun. Shoot the cowboy (low power) or regular factory fodder in it for practice. But buy Buffalo Bore, Garrett, etc.. for carrying in the woods. They are much, much, more powerful than the other ammo. Not something you will likely enjoy shooting very regularly. But much better for protection from bears. Pricey though. You might want to check the prices of the ammo before buying the gun. I hate to say this, but ammo prices are going through the roof in recent years. Go to the Marlin Owners forum and read some there. Tons of info...

    http://www.marlinowners.com/forums/i...oard,56.0.html
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  11. #11
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    Check out the Meehan Report on certain rounds do. It is a report from US Fish and wildlife from the 1980's.

    Ron

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    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    The guide gun makes a great hiking, camping, ATV and truck gun as is out of the box. That said, I took the fat fore arm off of mine and sanded the crap out of it until it had the same profile as a Winchester 94. Then I cut the barrel down to 16 ¼” and had a good recoil pad fitted to the butt stock. The slab sided receiver makes one handed carry very comfortable, and the overall weight is not objectionable. It is certainly not as easy to carry as my Winchester 94 trapper in 30/30, but it’s not bad.

    The Remington loaded ammo with the 405 grain jacketed bullet is a moderately powerful round that is also pleasant to shoot. I personally would not hesitate to poke a bear with one, but would prefer to use one of my home grown re-loads if I had a crystal ball that told me when a real encounter was likely…….

    Modifications and aftermarket parts abound for the Marlins, and pretty much the sky is the limit. See the previously mentioned Marlin Forums for tons of information.

    If you want to go the economy route, I would go with a used Remington 760 or 7600 pump action carbine in 30-06. they don’t seem to be very popular for some reason and can be picked up on the auction sites or locally (if you can find one) for reasonable prices. I paid $200 for mine and it was in about 90% condition. They balance and carry very well (without the scope) and are very quick for follow up shots. I load mine with 220 grain Hornady round nose bullets over H4350 and am confident that they would do well on bears at close range if needed. The Remington pumps are underrated in my opinion and are actually quite easy to use and maintain. You can have the entire thing disassembled with the barrel off the action, trigger group out, bolt soaking in kroil and a cold beer in your hands in about 5 minutes. Trigger pull weight is a job best left for the pro’s, but take-up and creep are easy to fix with a vice and a good file.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  13. #13

    Smile 45-70

    Get a Marlin 45-70 and learn to shoot it. Forget the scope on that type of lever gun. Not needed and just plain un-American to scope it. Put a scope on the 30-06 if needed.

  14. #14

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    I'd add ghost rings to the marlin,you'll like em more than a scope.

  15. #15
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Agreed. Upgrade the sights to some ghost rings with large aperture. Fast acquisition sites if you will. I put some XS Sight Systems ghost rings on my guide gun. Love them.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    I've got a Guide Gun in 450 Marlin (very similar to the 45-70) & it's my packing around the woods gun. I love it. Light, handy, quick, & powerful. I added XS Ghost ring peep sights (with the wings on the rear), an oversize lever & light weight pull Trigger from DRC, a butstock shell carrier that holds 6 rds, & a slip on Simms recoil pad. The add ons were fun but it was a fine functioning & capable gun right out of the box.
    Vance in AK.

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  17. #17

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    maybe I could just get a Marlin 336 30-30 and load it with heavier stuff for defense? Or would that not be nearly enough? I seem to be able to only come across used 336s for sale in my price range..I would like a used 1894 or 1895 model though, under $400

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    Don't quit looking. I bought my 1895M (450 Marlin Guide Gun) in as new condition for $400. from the classifides here in Feb. They are out there, you just have to keep looking.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  19. #19

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    the 1894 44 mag seems like a really good idea. its light, less recoil then 45/70, cheaper to shoot..

    I want to use the gun also for the range so I don't want to be spending a load for only a few rounds each time I go..the 45/70 would be nice but it is made for protection and hunting big game

    I think I can get away with a 1894 in 44 mag. It has power, and a 10 cap mag, two quick shots should take anything down if needed...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jduvall89 View Post
    the 1894 44 mag seems like a really good idea. its light, less recoil then 45/70, cheaper to shoot..

    I want to use the gun also for the range so I don't want to be spending a load for only a few rounds each time I go..the 45/70 would be nice but it is made for protection and hunting big game

    I think I can get away with a 1894 in 44 mag. It has power, and a 10 cap mag, two quick shots should take anything down if needed...
    The 1894 will work fine with the right ammo (I'd recomend 320gr hardcast for bear protection), but I'll be honest with you. In stock form I think I'd rather shoot my Marlin 1895 in 450 with 405 gr bullets at 1850-1900 fps (it's factory ported) than my Winchester 1894 Trapper carbine in 44 mag with hot 320 gr loads.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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