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Thread: egg sucking leech question

  1. #1
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    Default egg sucking leech question

    I'm getting ready to tie some of these for use this August .My first trip up and was wondering if I should wrap all of them with lead wire to help get them down .

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    generally yes.

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    One more question , my egg sucking leech recipe is calling for a mustad 9672 3x long streamer hook , I already have a 79580 in size 2 and 4 , should I use the ones I have or is there enough difference that I should get the 9672 , also what size hook is best for silvers , chums , pinks ?

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    The hooks you have will work just fine. 4x, 3x, 2x, long... it's all close enough. Just use what you have. Size 2 and 4 will do you fine for silvers, chums, and pinks. You could tie up a few 6's as well to key towards pinks, but I think the hooks you have now will get you a long way.

    That's the beauty of tying your own. I usually think of fly recipes as guidelines or suggestions.

    I too usually weight my ESLs to get 'em down.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

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    Definitely hit em with the lead wrap. Also, if you happen to have overly fluffy (thick hide etc.) bunny fur, open up the wraps so it's not quite as buoyant and water resistant when swinging, definitely helps keep em down and they are still plenty puffy. I usually add barbell eyes as well, if that isn't already part of your recipe.

    I usually feel that most Alaskan flies have three things in common....fur, hook, lead. The rest is personal preference.

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    Great , I'm glad they will work , it seems like every time I want to tie something different I have to go buy more materials , it gets expensive !!!

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    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chugbug View Post
    Great , I'm glad they will work , it seems like every time I want to tie something different I have to go buy more materials , it gets expensive !!!
    You learn quickly grasshopper!

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by chugbug View Post
    Great , I'm glad they will work , it seems like every time I want to tie something different I have to go buy more materials , it gets expensive !!!

    It's a total trap.

  9. #9
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    Default Bigger (longer) is (occasionally) better?

    Quote Originally Posted by chugbug View Post
    One more question , my egg sucking leech recipe is calling for a mustad 9672 3x long streamer hook , I already have a 79580 in size 2 and 4 , should I use the ones I have or is there enough difference that I should get the 9672 , also what size hook is best for silvers , chums , pinks ?
    Good advice.
    Your 79580 looks like a down-eye 4X-long hook, vs the recipe's suggested 3X. The 4X leeches (wooly buggers) you tie might even tempt a larger fish .

    The 2 toughest obstacles to catching fish here for me were: getting the fly down (that's where the fish usually seem to be) and feeling the strike.

    Adding weight (lead wrap or heavy dumbbell eyes (my favorite)) will pull your fly down, making each cast/swing more productive because it's closer to the fish (bottom).

    A light fly might have more action (and a fat fly might look tastier), but suited only to slower current/shallower runs of water.

    Hope your trip is productive. Pictures in September?

  10. #10
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Lots of good ideas above. I am going to throw out something different. While I am all about fishing down deep, I find it helpful to use less weight on the flies and a 3' leader on a fast sink tip instead of a super heavy fly. For example a Scienific Anglers "wet tip" line in type IV which is a 14' sinking tip line. Put on a size #2 esl with little or no weight. Let the sink tip line and the 3' leader do the work for you. I think the added action helps here. It could be argued either way of course, but in my experience, lighter flies on a heavy sink tips and short leader works very well. Employed this on silvers and trophy dollies mostly. Works for me. Sidenote on esl colors. Purple with pink head is tough to beat. I have also had great luck with olive bodied and pink heads. Since you are tying your own, skies the limit. But do try some olive with pink head. Not washed out girlie pink man. I am talking flourescent, need sunglasses, girls lipstick would be called "neon pink" pink. Food for thought anyway.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    dantherock, nailed it on the head. How much weight your using on the fly depends on the type of line you are using. If I'm swinging a 10ft sink tip I like to have some flies weighted and some not. That way if I get into slow or shallow water I'm are not snagging the bottom too often. If you plan on dead drifting you are probably going to split shot your long leader. So any amount of weight can be used via split shots. If you plan on swinging with a floating line I would definately weight some and not others. A jigging strip (ie weighted head) definately makes a differance though.

  12. #12

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    I've never tied them with lead or dumbell eyes and have done just fine. they are still productive. That said, I have bought the ones with dumbell eyes and they have been a little more productive, but it depends on what you're trying to do with the fly. I would suggest tying all types and variations of colors. Purple, olive, and black bodies have worked best for me.

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    Great info guys , Thanks , I'll be looking today for some pink chenille and get to tying some of these little critters up real soon. Can't wait !!

    Is there any sites where you can see the hooks in actual size ???

  14. #14
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    There is some info here that may be of interest to you...

    http://www.alaskaflyfish.net/esl.htm
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    I like to use bigger hooks for salmon...usually mustad salmon hooks in #2 to 1/0....usually 1/0. Mustad b/c their cheap and work just fine. IMO a size 4 hook for silvers is pretty small...big and nasty usually does the trick for me. If the bite is off, I'll switch to small egg type patterns and dead-drift, usually dime-sized glo-bugs on a #2 gamakatsu. Pinks will bite just about anything if you twitch it right

    I always use dumbel eyes for leeches. Cactus chenille for the body and plenty of flashabou. Easier to make a nice egg-head and better action if you use a rapala knot.

    If you want to stay cheap, make a bunch of popcicles...they work great for silvers and are very cheap and quick to tie. Just a few chicken feathers and some flash. The hook is the only spendy part. Big-arse clouser minnows work good too and are simple to tie.
    Nice Marmot.

  16. #16
    Member TruBluTex's Avatar
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    I've had luck usin' a brass cone-head which is good for weighin' it down, too!
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  17. #17
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    Default More good information...

    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    There is some info here that may be of interest to you...

    http://www.alaskaflyfish.net/esl.htm
    Great website - fly recipes and step-by-step instructions, illustrated. Thanks, Dan.

  18. #18

    Default Depends on the Situation

    I never weight my flies for silvers when fishing my favorite river. I don't use my fancy sink tips either. I use varying amounts of split shot. Sometimes a lot!

    You definately have to change your casting stroke to keep the fly and split shot from hitting you or the rod. I cast slightly up, down or straight acrossed the stream depending on the depth of the water. I then strip in short 1 foot increments with my rod tip low to the water to keep in contant contact with the fly. When you feel a tug or bump I lift the rod to set the hook and hang on. Often it's bottom, but often enough it's a cartwheeling salmon.

    Yes, it's check and duck. Yes, it hurts like hell if the split shot wack you in the back of the head. Yes, it can be a bit ugly. And yes, it gets the fly in the strike zone RIGHT NOW! And it yes it slays the silvers in my favorite river.

    I might not even fish that river this year. I just purchased an ocean boat and am going to try silvers in the salt if the opportunity arises this summer or fall. Maybe its time to break out my super fast sinking lines again?

    Tight lines

  19. #19
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Different weights, colors, techniques for different water depths, currents

    Different weights/techniques for different conditions. Bill England, who used to teach fly tying at Mtn View, said he tied different colors for different weights; so he could tell by color which woolly bugger/ESL was heavier.

    BTW: I guess you can thread a bead (attractor) on before a woolly bugger to make an Egg-Sucking Leech. I wonder if anyone's found that to work as well as the usual ESL?

    Good luck this summer.

  20. #20

    Default legal?

    be shure if you weight you fly you are not in a fly fishing only area. In these areas you may only use one unweighted fly.

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