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Thread: Simple fishing in alaska - is it possible?

  1. #1
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    Default Simple fishing in alaska - is it possible?

    So I am experienced with camping and hiking, I am not much of a fisherman. I like to fish with a cane pole, bobber, and worm and a hook. I am coming up from the lower 48, and was interested in fishing, but just something simple.

    From what I have seen so far there are all kinds of regluations for types of fish, locations, etc. Are there any simple fish, like bluegill or bass, that has less regulations? Also, how do you control which fish takes your bait?

  2. #2
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    Fishing hole on the Homer Spit bobbers will work there with a herring
    so will a blue vibrex as well as a 16 oz snagging hook-----kinda fun to watch with a glacier-d and a strawberry shake!!

  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Where in Alaska will you be? There are some options that are more simple than others, but it is highly varied depending on location.

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    Member akshrop's Avatar
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    You can fish very simply if you wish. You must read the regs for where you are fishing. They are location and species specific and have restrictions on bait, hooks, dates, ect... Pay very close attention to the regs and know what fish is what. Don't get discouraged with the regs, if you look and read, you will find out what you can do where. You will be able to find a place you can do what you would like to do. Stop by a bait shop close to where you want to fish (after you know the regs) and get some local info. Finally just have a good time and stay legal.

    Alaska fish and game has the regs on line plus a ton of other info, including the stocked fisheries.

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    Default Go on a half day halibut charter

    go to homer and get on rainbo charters half day boat its simple you just reel up fish it cant get any easyer

  6. #6
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Most lakes allow the use of bait. I have not found a species yet that will not take a nightcrawler. You won't be fishing for salmon, but Dolly Varden, Rainbow Trout, Lake Trout, Burbot, and maybe Whitefish and grayling, depending on where in the state you are at.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    It's tough to beat a canoe and a lake for a nice relaxing evening or day of fishing. While I love motoring out into the sound for creatures from the deep, when it comes to relaxed enjoyable fishing it's padlling out into a lake with no one around, listening to the loons call, casting spoons from an u/l outfit into lilly pads, and waiting for the rainbows to strike the lure.

    I've used bobbers with salmon eggs and have also heard that cocktail shrimp is very effective. I'm just too impatient to fish with bait, a man's got to know his limitations

  8. #8
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    Default Stocked Lakes

    To fish as you describe, your best bet is any of the dozens of stocked lakes. ADF&G stocks many lakes with most of the salmonoid species: Rainbow Trout, Dolly Varden, Arctic Char, Grayling, and land-locked kings and silvers (Chinook and Coho). Any of these stocked lakes are great for just sitting in a canoe with a pole and bobber, and it almost doesn't matter what you put on your hook - worms, shrimp, brightly colored balls of yarn - they hit it all (don't use the yarn - it's just an example - they have hit my stike indicator on many occasions). Makes it great for getting younger children interested in fishing, or for us children-at-heart to just relax on the water.

    Check this link to get a list of all stocked lakes, sorted by region, so that you can look for whatever area you'll be visiting.
    http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/statewide/lakedata/

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