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Thread: My rifles, which one for interior grizzlies?

  1. #1
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    Default My rifles, which one for interior grizzlies?

    I am going on a brown bear hunt in the interior this fall. I do not have the money to buy a gun just for a single hunt so I have to use what I've got. My options are as follows.

    .280 Remington- It's a stainless steel ruger hawkeye all weather. Not having to worry about getting it wet and rust is a big relief for me. It is not as powerful of a round as I'd like for brown bear but I do hand load and can work up a .175 grain load for it and keep my shots inside 200.

    .308 Springfield M1A Standard. I like the .308 ballistics better than my .280 REM but the barrel is a parkerized and I do not have a scope for it. My shots would be limited to about 100-150 yards. As far as the parkarized steel it will not hold up to the elements as well as the stainless of my .280 and I'd hate to do any damage to a gun like that.

    .45-70 in a NEF Single Shot 18 inch barrel with open sights. Obviously the .45-70 has the necissary power and can actually stop a bear if one was to charge me but I am limited to 75-100 yards with this gun. It also has a blued barrel and will not stand up to the elements as well as stainless.

    Getting close is something I am use to doing and willing to do as I am also a bow hunter but this is going to be my last hunt in Alaska before I PCS and my last chance at a brown bear for the next several years. I'd hate to have a bear out at the 200 yard mark on the last day and not be able to shoot it.

    I know there are better cartridges out there for bear and believe me if I could afford a gun I would buy one for the occasion but I can't so I will have to choose one of the above. Thanks for any pointers.
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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARKY View Post

    I'd hate to have a bear out at the 200 yard mark on the last day and not be able to shoot it.
    Doesn't the above statement answer your own question?
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Do you know anyone that you could borrow a gun from?

    If you want to meet at the range sometime, I have a 30-06 that I'd be willing to let you take out if you'd feel comfortable with that. For a service member on his last Alaskan hunt, I'd be happy to lend a hand. It's not a pretty gun, but it's accurate and has taken plenty of animals. No pressure - just let me know sometime.

  4. #4
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    Go with your 280. Use a premium bullet and it should do the job as well as a 30-06 would.
    It's all about shot placement. Just wait for the the right time and squeeze the trigger.

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    I'll also suggest the .280 if you shoot it well, alternatively Brian's generous offer of the .30-06 isn't a bad choice either if you're so inclined.

    I'd use the .280 with a good bullet- Partition, TSX, etc. and put it where it counts.

    Good luck!

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    My dad's buddy has been using .270 to take down moose for 30+ years. That's all he'll every use. A .280 will do the job fine.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by shirtr View Post
    Go with your 280. Use a premium bullet and it should do the job as well as a 30-06 would.
    It's all about shot placement. Just wait for the the right time and squeeze the trigger.
    I think your 280 will do well, but you should probably be picky about your shot and keep it inside 200 yds. I wouldn't try a shoulder shot unless at close range.

    Another option.... sell one or two of your guns and buy another one. How important is this hunt to you? I know a lot of guys like the 30.06, and it's a good round... but... would you take a 200 yd plus shot on a large griz with one? I just pushed some 180 E-Tips through my 300 WSM @ 3200 fps last Sat. That load will hit a griz at 300 yds with the same punch an .06 will at 25 yds.

    something to think about...

    Hope you get a nice griz,

    MR

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    I stole this off Wikpedia:
    The .280 Remington is capable of developing energy nearly equal to the .30-06 Springfield, but with lighter bullets having a better ballistic coefficient. Thus, the .280 has a better trajectory and retains more energy downrange. However, the .30-06 produces more energy than the .280 with bullets heavier than 180 grains. The .280 is suitable for hunting any game in North America.

    Doesn't seem like a 30-06 offers any real difference.

    The average interior griz isn't so big it will take any more killing than a young moose.
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    Default Which One?

    If your worried about not having enough knock down power, take the 45-70. Getting it wet should be the least of your worries.

    However, if you shoot the .280 well and are confident with shot placement it would do the job just fine, your 200 yds limitations seems reasonable for this weapon.

  10. #10
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    Default I second that

    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    I'll also suggest the .280 if you shoot it well, alternatively Brian's generous offer of the .30-06 isn't a bad choice either if you're so inclined.

    I'd use the .280 with a good bullet- Partition, TSX, etc. and put it where it counts.

    Good luck!
    I would have to agree with hodgeman.

    Kudo's to you Brian

  11. #11
    Member dwhunter's Avatar
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    I would not hesitate to use my 280 rem on interior grizz, having seen what it will do with 140gr tsx bullets I have the utmost confidence in the round. I would though consider taking a buddy with a larger round just in case.

    Doug

  12. #12
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    Default .280

    Think about it. Traditional .30-06 loaded with 180 grain bullet @ 2700 fps versus .280 with 175 grain bullet @ 2700 fps. There's only 5 grains difference in bullet weight, but the .280 bullet will have a better sectional density. I doubt the bear will know the difference.

    I will be taking my .280 sheep hunting this year, and will probably take a few 175 grainers along just in case I see a bear that I can't live without.

  13. #13

    Thumbs up just do it....

    Stick a 160 grain Barnes X or 175 grain Nosler Partition or Swift A Frame in your .280 and kill your self a griz. After you have shot him in the right place he is yours, just keep shooting as needed. Nothing wrong with a self imposed 200 yard limit for your first shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    I'll also suggest the .280 if you shoot it well, alternatively Brian's generous offer of the .30-06 isn't a bad choice either if you're so inclined.

    I'd use the .280 with a good bullet- Partition, TSX, etc. and put it where it counts.

    Good luck!
    I too agree.
    And as far as the stainless/blue thing, blued rifles can be maintained easily to last fine in the weather, & the parkerized finish on the M1A will withstand some nasty weather too.
    Vance in AK.

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  15. #15

    Default Rifle

    The M1A is a good rifle but very heavy for this job and battle style sights would be very limiting as far as light enhancement at ranges. The 45-70 is a good rifle for close in work and is capable of doing your desired job. The blue finish can be coated with a protectant and should do fine should you choose this rifle. The 280 may be the best choice though. This rifle should allow you to ambush an interior grizzly at ample range with adequate power to accomplish your mission.
    The scope will give you more time in the evening and morning (providing your hunting that time of year) and help increase your bullet placement.
    I would suggest an ammo with a heavy for caliber premium bullet; something 160 grs or more. Then add lot of practice. NOT from a bench but from different positions; prone,sitting, standing. Learn your capabilities from those positions;PRACTICE,PRACTICE,PRACTICE. Get in shape and have a good hunt!
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    Given the options you have and the fact that you aren't confident in the others at the range you want to be able to shoot, I think the 280 is the clear choice here. For interior grizzlies, it will be just fine. Just be careful with your shots and don't do anything stupid like chasing a bear into the willows. If you shoot one and have to follow it into cover, sit down and wait for an hour or so first....but, better yet, just make that first shot count.
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    I think even if you did have the money to spend on a new rifle, there would be no need. Any of those you listed are fine, take whichever you shoot best.
    But I am a one gun hunter for anything larger than deer, and smaller than Kodiak bears (which I don't hunt anyway) so it takes all the confusion out of it....just grab the ol' hot-6.....
    My dad handily killed an interior grizz handily with a .270 a few years ago.
    That's a limited amount of data to make a scientific conclusion from, but it satisfied me that the 270 at least is sufficient under the right conditions.
    And you have stated your self imposed limitations, which I think are very realistic.
    OK we want to see pictures this fall....

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    If all else fails, I might loan you my .375, gotta know you a little first. Its a little big but what the heck. Of the ones listed, I would take the 45-70, but that's just me.

  19. #19

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    I would say the options in order of desirability would be as follows.

    1. borrow a more suitable gun early enough to get comfortable with it.

    2. Use the 45-70 buy and learn to use a rangefinder and take the time to learn the trajectory of you're gun. Try to practice at unknown ranges and see if you can't put the first shot in the kill zone. Either buy a scope or borrow one from another gun.

    3. Use the .308, but only if you have a friend backing you up with something bigger.

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    If I were you, I would just chase one down barefooted and gnaw on his neck till he gives up!!!!!!!!!

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