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Thread: Liner or Bivy sack to increase sleep bag temp

  1. #1

    Default Liner or Bivy sack to increase sleep bag temp

    I have a 20 degree bag that is right on the line of comfort when it gets down to around 30. Want to give myself a little pad. Looking at liners or a bivy sack to increase temp rating just a little. Any recommendations on which way to go.

  2. #2
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    both will increase your temp rating for your bag. but, unless you are sleeping outside under a tarp or without any covering, i would not use a bivy bag to increase your temp rating. most are waterproof so their ability to breath and let out condensation is poor. a sleeping bag liner is the way to go. check out REI, they carry several. some are poly and some are wool/poly. some folks use them to keep their body oils off their sleeping bag, but i don't see the point of a sleeping bag in the wilderness if you are going to treat it as if it can't get dirty. a washing every now and then will take care of it. they sell thick ones and thinner ones. you should be looking towards the thinner ones. will help you in what you are trying to achieve.

    i just saw the above post, and your pad should be looked at as well. a thin ultralight pad will not keep you as warm. good point.
    Last edited by hre814; 05-10-2009 at 19:55. Reason: extra info

  3. #3

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    There are other ways to increase your warmth rating using the same bag. Possibly using a higher rated pad, wearing additional or warmer garments to bed, or adding a down or insulated jacket inside with you in the bag?

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Yep, many bags are given their rating based on using at least a base layer while in the bag. I have a bulky fleece liner that I haul on winter hunts for some added warmth when out overnight on the sled. I am looking at one of the thin silk ones for backpacking. They are only a couple ounces and if they work then are probably worth the added weight. Of course you could buy a Wiggy's bag and then have one that is actually rated to sleep at the temp specified though they do have a bit more bulk than some highly compressible sacks.

  5. #5

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    I had the 20 deg bag made over at Barney's and it was pretty warm on the top side, but I got cool on my back. I was sleeping on an air mattress instead of the normal ground pad. I think that might have been part of the issue. I am thinking I will get the reactor liner for the bag. Just wanted to see if anyone had some good ideas before I go down that road. Don't know whether to look towards a fleece or silk liner as an alternative.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    I do not know about silk bag liners, but my silk long johns add a lot of warmth for very little weight.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Cocoon liners are available is several different materials. I started using one just to keep my bag clean but it also helps with warmth. Especially by eliminating that cold nylon touching your skin when you first climb in. These days I take a dedicated set of thermal underwear to sleep in. They accomplish the same thing and I don't get tangled up in the middle of the night. The primary purpose is still to keep the bag clean but the comfort factor is a welcome bonus.

  8. #8

    Default liner

    I use a silk liner in mine which only weighs a couple of ounces but raises the rated warmth by about 7 degrees.... people keep talking about why you need your bag clean... the reason for the liner is that it keeps the body oils from your bad.... people ask why that is important.... " I am camping, dirty is fine."..... well for anyone who has an expensive down sleeping bag ( mine ran me over 300 ) a liner will prevent your bag from absorbing the oils from your skin. Those oils will gradually get to the down and clump it up.. in other words you can keep your equipment in better shape longer with something as simple as a liner. If I had a sythetic bag I or some crappy bag, I wouldn't bother with a 50 dollar liner fyi.

  9. #9
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    Default what I did...

    I use Barney's 20 degree bag...

    I got cold once... Here's what I did...

    Reactor Thermolite bag liner - http://www.seatosummit.com/products/display/24

    Hot socks - http://www.integraldesigns.com/produ...ail.cfm?id=681

    Never been cold again!

  10. #10
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    Default Breathable Bivy

    When humidity and moisture are a concern, I have heard really great things about the Event stuff, better than Gore Tex. The Mountain Hardwear brand has a few bags also using Pertex Endurance? Some gear editor slept out in the open air with mild snow and rain and had no loss of loft or breathability. If I was spending big bucks (over $200) on a sleeping bag, I would go with something like this. I also sleep in fleece to keep the bag clean and add a few degrees warmth. I find that in the age of "lighter is better", adding a couple oz's for a specific item used only in one way is less advantageous than adding a couple items of clothing that can multi task.

  11. #11

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    I have a nice integral design bag with the pertex endurance fabric. It is a great bag that was made to fit my larger size. I got the 20 degree rating based upon the temps that I normally hunt at. I have a 0 degrees Wiggy's bag that I use when things cool off a bit, but it is heavy for packing around. I think I will get the reactor bag liner and call it good. Should not have an issue at that point.

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    I have the silk liner and it does add an extra couple of degrees that everyone talks about, and I think it feels better then fleece against the skin which enhances sleep comfort. But if I were to do it again I would buy a dedicated set of long johns (your preference) silk or silk weight fleece and use them to replace the bag. The reason being that the long johns could be used for more then just sleeping if needed and could be added to your clothing system if the weather was not if your favour.
    I didnít notice any funk factor with the silk liner as I had on a wool top layer to sleep in.

    Here is some silk options from MEC.

    http://search.mec.ca/?N=10&Ntt=silk&bmUID=1242748304726

    I know there was a company in the US that made silk liners but I canít find the web address I will add the link if I find it.

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