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Thread: Fly fishing from a canoe? How practical?

  1. #1
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    Default Fly fishing from a canoe? How practical?

    Is it possible to fly fish from a canoe?

    Friend of mine has a canoe he is thinking of trading off and if practical I may get it to use on area lakes. Just not sure how stable a canoe would be for fly fishing. Seems like it would be fine once I get used to handling one.
    Just a bitter Alaskan clinging to his guns and religion.....

  2. #2
    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Default Easy Stuff

    Fly fishing from a canoe may have its issue however very doable. The key is you and if you have a fishing buddy that you learn to cast without shifting your body. Back in the day I had one fishing friend who mastered it we always had a great time rarely rocked the boat even in a stream fishing anchored up in deep holes very fund. I had another friend who just could not cast without shifting his weight all the time and trust me not fun at all dumped us a couple of times (not fun).

    As with anything practice practice practice oh and get your casting arm and wrist in shape :-)

    Go For It!

    Best Wishes and Tight Lines

    Blue Moose

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    then for 119.00 you can get a colman pontoon to stabliize it...

    at least thats what they were 3-4 years ago..
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  4. #4

    Default Easy

    Its real easy to flyfish out of a canoe. It takes a little practice, that's all.

    When I was a kid we'd take turns standing up in the canoe to get more distance on our cast. I don't do that anymore.

  5. #5

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    While canoes are faster I usually prefer a float tube. When fishing for rising trout a canoe can often swing around in the slightest puff of wind. It is also more likely to make ripples tht could put fish down. That said, if all I
    I had were access to a canoe that is what I'd use.

  6. #6

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    Only advice is dont bring inexperienced flyfishermen that might overturn you. Had an old roomate years ago I took that was new to flyfishing and probally was a little too big for being in a canoe going down a river. (my poor judgement). We got to a slow section we were going to fish and his rocking back and fourth our canoe had no chance. Tipped over, he lost all his gear, mine was tied to the boat, so I was lucky. That is my only drawback. I would flyfish out of it by myself, or someone that knows how to handle themselves in a canoe and fishing.

  7. #7

    Default Canoes OK w/ us

    My daughters and I flyfish out of our Old town Guide 147 without a problem. That canoe is very stable on flatwater and my girls have grown up in it so no problem at all.

    -hiker

  8. #8
    Member JimJimmers's Avatar
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    I prefer the canoe....alone. If you've got 2 people in the canoe, you're asking for trouble. Aside from literally 'rocking the boat', you're really limiting yourself from casting direction. unless you're both trolling behind the boat, you should consider going solo. I've found that I can catch just as many fish from my canoe as I can in my float tube...plus you can cover more ground quickly.

  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    One small thing you may be overlooking, don't assume that to fly fish you need to stand up. I use Ally pack canoes on most of our Alaska float trips. We can fly fish from the canoes fine, but we would never stand up. Never. Your timing is important and you will cut back to about 70% of your normal casting distance, but it is easier to do than you might at first think. Same applies back in my home state (North Carolina), we fly fish from our kayaks all the time. Give up on the thought of standing and enjoy.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  10. #10

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    I fish out of mine alone quite a bit. I have a canoe and a sevylor inflatable kayak, that btw has been through hell and back and has treated me very well including a 140 mile solo float trip (sheep hunt). The inflatable is looow to the water so you'd better be good at shooting line. That is the key, tight loops and not casting too much to get line out...but if you can you can do quite well. If not you'll still do fine. I dont stand up in mine at all, there is no point. Canoe seats are plenty high enough to cast with and I'd prefer to be alone in it then have a 'buddy' one person fishes the other paddles...no thanks...bring your canoe we can both fish!

  11. #11
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    Default

    I stand up in my canoe and fly fish all the time. I've never really had a problem doing that either. I wouldn't recommend doing it with a second person in the boat, unless you're good at casting while sitting down.

    Practice, practice, practice. Remember your PFD as well, tie everything in and don't worry about flipping during your practices.

  12. #12
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Longer fly rod?

    I think the float tube guys like a slightly longer fly rod for lifting the line off the water -- Of course, that's an added expense, but if your friend has a 9'6" or 10' 4-5 wt fly rod too, you're set!

  13. #13

    Default I've always fished out of a canoe

    usually with someone else, mostly lake fishing. With the new tubes and small cats, if I were going alone I would grab one of them. For two people, if you switch off casting, you can really put your partner in some sweet spots to fish to. If you align the canoe canted a little toward the left, no matter how much body english they put into the cast, you should be out of the backcast and not upset the boat. I used to enjoy the boat handling almost as much as the fishing! Both people casting need to make sure they are "out of sync" with their casts.
    Mike
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  14. #14
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I've been fishing from canoes for 15 years, never flipped one. I like my float tube better for local lakes though.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  15. #15

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    I think it depends on the individual doing the casting. My buddy does it without a problem. I have never been accused of being over-coordinated and managed to flip his canoe so that it sunk with all our gear. Luckily there was a raft passing by and he rescued us and saved the canoe and all gear. Lesson learned. He can cast standing, by mutual agreement I don't.
    It doesn't matter what you miss them with.

  16. #16
    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    You know your not catching any fish when you start talking about the weather...


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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bilder View Post
    Is it possible to fly fish from a canoe?

    Friend of mine has a canoe he is thinking of trading off and if practical I may get it to use on area lakes. Just not sure how stable a canoe would be for fly fishing. Seems like it would be fine once I get used to handling one.
    Surpisingly not mentioned by other forum members......IT DEPENDS ON WHAT TYPE OF CANOE. I've owned at least 2 dozen diff. canoes over the years. The three I have right now are two 17.5 ft. square sterned canoes, and one penobscot (all Old Town Canoes as I used to work for em). The Penobscot 17 is only about 33 inches at the waterline and 36 inches wide (gunwale width). I've had a couple "whoopdewhoops" in that son of a gun....trying to get that perfect standing/long distance cast. Now....my freighters are about 44 inches wide (fat) and very stable. Square sterned freighter and sport canoes are much better suited for casting a fly. Two flyfisherman can cast with ease. Some of these freighters are well beyond 20 ft. long so it works out great. Actually........the square sterned canoe of sufficient width......is IMO one of the finest fly fishing boats around. You can car top em, motor them, paddle them, haul moose meat, caribou meat, dip net for hooligan, get down the sloughs n creeks for ducks, and fit a bunch of people. So....for the ROADSIDE angler....a small outboard and a freighter will get you plenty of places all summer long.......and still haul your moose meat upriver in September. They have some big time pros over a float tube too........you can motor anywhere in a resonable amount of time, shut off the motor......and quietly stalk weary late season trout by paddle. Favorite flyfishing in a canoe.........Susitna Lake with a monster Lake Trout ripping backing off my reel as if he was related to a King Salmon.......I lost him.....u never forget the ones you loose.

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    Default Fly fishing from a canoe How practical

    So, just for Clarity, you said this is a Bear hunt and fishing trip. Youre the guide and youll do it for "3500 each for two people".

    I think people are mistaking this for a 10 day grizz hunt for 2 people for 3,500...... Thats not what youre saying.. is it ?

  19. #19
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    Fly fishing in northern minnesota on the lakes I always take a canoe up with me. Never had a problem... but I fish from a seated position! Did an earlier post say he stands up in the canoe?!! Yep, that would probably result in a few close calls. (On a few occassions I take the dog out with me, and things still pretty stable.) All said, haven't fallen in the drink yet!

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