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Thread: Tips for Amatuer

  1. #1
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    Default Tips for Amatuer

    Wife and I are leaving for Cordova Bear hunt in 1 week and am having issues with a newly purchased Olympus 850SW.

    Outdoor shots seem to be grainy---

    What setting should I use or could you reccomend -- should I use the image stabilization or leave it alone-- I guess what I,m trying to say is is their a foolproof setting we can use for general landscape shots to subject shots.

    Any tips appreciated

    Sincerely

    CapnJack

  2. #2
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    Leave Image Stabilization on all the time unless you have the camera mounted to a steady tripod. Some IS systems don't play well with tripods, and I don't know what the Oly will do.

    Grainy usually means high ISO or under exposure. ISO should be as low as you can go for the conditions, so 100 in most daytime situations. Raise it to as much as 400 if you absolutely have to (in low light) to keep the camera shake blur to a minimum. You can go higher, but it will definitely be grainy.

    If you are already shooting at 100 ISO, and have grainy pictures, your camera might be under exposing. I believe the Oly has exposure compensation to deal with that.

  3. #3
    Member tull777's Avatar
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    I would try setting the cameras functions to fully automatic and try a few shots in broad daylight and a few shots just after the sun has set behind the mountains or bellow the horizon.

    It is good to get to know your new camera and all of its functions, but It may be better to just play it safe and go with the fully auto settings for now. Might be risky to try some manual shots on a trip like the one you are taking. I agree with Jim, Leave the IS turned on and get to know the ISO.

    You may want to borrow a small digital camera for the trip as a backup.

    Looking forward to viewing the shots from your trip and good luck with the hunt!
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    Agree with you Tull777.

    The OP can always try the camera in a sort of semi-automatic mode such as Av for the time being, since he doesn't have much time before he leaves. However, there are books specifically written for the XS, and these books save a great deal of time learning how to use it properly.

    On Av (aperture priority) mode, the OP controls the lens aperture, and the camera matches it with the proper shutter speed. The OP still has control of the aperture, ISO, and most camera functions, so he will have to learn how to set those properly. That's where the book becomes handy.

    Things to remember are such as setting the correct WB (white balance):
    -For taking photos in the shade
    -Daylight
    -Night
    -Tungsten lights
    -Fluorescent, etc.

    ISO:
    -Lowest ISO's for sunny or bright days
    -Around 200-400 on cloudy days, shade, etc.

    The camera manual should get him going on the right direction, but he will need a book written for it.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by RayfromAK View Post
    Agree with you Tull777.

    The OP can always try the camera in a sort of semi-automatic mode such as Av for the time being, since he doesn't have much time before he leaves. However, there are books specifically written for the XS, and these books save a great deal of time learning how to use it properly.

    On Av (aperture priority) mode, the OP controls the lens aperture, and the camera matches it with the proper shutter speed. The OP still has control of the aperture, ISO, and most camera functions, so he will have to learn how to set those properly. That's where the book becomes handy.

    Things to remember are such as setting the correct WB (white balance):
    -For taking photos in the shade
    -Daylight
    -Night
    -Tungsten lights
    -Fluorescent, etc.

    ISO:
    -Lowest ISO's for sunny or bright days
    -Around 200-400 on cloudy days, shade, etc.

    The camera manual should get him going on the right direction, but he will need a book written for it.
    If it were me... I would try to stay away from even ISO 400 - as that can get grainy to discerning eyes. My suggestions are to get a tri or even a mono-pod to the shade/darker shots (if possible). Pictures with DSLR's are not the of the point and shoot mentality - and you should take the time to set things up and focus on what you are taking. As with any piece of technical equipment it needs to become an extension of yourself.

    But...this is my opinion and how I do my pictures - so take it as a suggestion but not a 'do it'!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by wxmanSam View Post
    If it were me... I would try to stay away from even ISO 400 - as that can get grainy to discerning eyes. My suggestions are to get a tri or even a mono-pod to the shade/darker shots (if possible). Pictures with DSLR's are not the of the point and shoot mentality - and you should take the time to set things up and focus on what you are taking. As with any piece of technical equipment it needs to become an extension of yourself.

    But...this is my opinion and how I do my pictures - so take it as a suggestion but not a 'do it'!
    Please accept my most sincere apologies. I posted at the wrong location in response to another thread.

    To the OP: Please ignore my explanations above, since you are referring to another camera than the one I talked about.

  7. #7
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Thumbs up, for great advice !! Keep it on auto, learn your camera and play with it. that is the only way to learn how to use your camera to its full potential.

    Probably the best advice I can add to this, and it is very important, the results will become evident, when you learn how to breathe and squeeze, never press that shutter.!! it should comes as a surprise when that shutter trips. (hand held). take a deep breath, let half out and hold and squeeze. -=[click]=- practice.. .. makes better !!

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