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Thread: long term storage so hide doesnt slip

  1. #1

    Default long term storage so hide doesnt slip

    For the first time I think I want to keep a hide rather than give it away of a spring black bear but due to some cost will have to wait a little while to get it to taxidermy. Should I salt it and then freeze it or just get it home in a freezer right away to prevent slippage

  2. #2

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    I'd flesh it real good then freeze it.

  3. #3
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    Default Alpha Fur Dressers

    I have in the past brought it to alpha fur dressers over behind spenard builders supply and just have it fleshed and tanned.. doesnt cost that much to have it tanned then you can save freezer space, and bring it to a taxidermist when you get the $$$$

  4. #4
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default Tan it.

    I have done the same thing. (actually NEVER took the hide to taxidermy like I planned) Have it tanned. It will keep forever and the only maintenance will be a nail in the corner to hang the nose on. If you freeze it, you just lost a bunch of freezer space which is kinda like a crime! You'll regret it every time you have to move it to get to the moose burger.

  5. #5
    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Default

    Do not salt it then put it in the freezer ,It will not freeze with salt on it major slipping then. Just freeze it .Flesh it if possible Roll it tight so all the air is out of the bag and freeze it will keep for years with out freezer burn if done right.

    Roger
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

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    Member akfirefighter's Avatar
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    Default

    Flesh it first then freeze it if that is what you want to do. If you flesh it out before you freeze it you will be happier then fleshing it when it comes time to thaw it. It is alot easier to flesh the hide when it is fresh and not frozen and thawed. No need to salt if you are going to freeze it right away. Good luck to ya.

  7. #7

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    talked to alpha fur he said 325 to tan and remove skull and seal so i am going tio go with him

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    Default Alpha Fur

    Quote Originally Posted by blackbear View Post
    talked to alpha fur he said 325 to tan and remove skull and seal so i am going tio go with him

    They are awesome... and reasonably priced.. you will be happy you wont have to worry about freezing it and wasting space and worrying about losing power....and hid get ruined..

  9. #9
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    If you do have the hide tanned but you intend to have it mounted someday it is still best to freeze the hide after it is tanned. It will last much longer that way. Even a tanned hide will only last a couple of years for a life size mount if it is not frozen

  10. #10

    Talking long term storage

    I you're going to store a hide or cape in a freezer for considerable time, then it needs to be fleshed properly, lips split, cartlidge removed from nose, eyes split, ears turned and bones completely removed from feet or paws. If this isn't done, then later it can freezer burn and dry out so badly that the hide's a loss. Best way is to have all the prep work done and tanned...then soak the hide in warm water for a short time (or soak the feet and head, then sponge the rest), let it drain, roll it up tight and then bag it and freeze it. Now it will last for years, and when thawed, it will be just like a fresh tan. As Cub stated, a tanned hide not frozen will only last for a certain period (depending on the tan) because the leather fibers continue to break down and when they are soaked for mounting, then they can fall apart or at best, lose size because their elasticity deteriorates. If the hide isn't going to be mounted, then that won't matter because they will not be soaked.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  11. #11

    Default If I were going to store

    it for a long time (years), I would make sure everything is turned and fleshed and then salt it heavily and let it dry out. You can store it for years that way and not worry about it. Have had bear hides done like that and then tanned and they were perfect.

  12. #12
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Thumbs up increase your skills set

    Here I go again....
    My suggestion would be to take it to Alfa Furs. Ask Gary if you can watch how his crew does the paws, head , and fleshing and salting. The guys will let you help if you appear like you can gets your fingers dirty.

    Then stay and assist with a second bear, a big brown bear. If his crew speaks entirely espanole and refers to you are Gringo, then its time to leave and continue your education with your taxidermist. But if they speak occasional english and call you Hombre then stay and do a third a bear pelt. And presto, you just learned everything there is to know about processing a bear pelt. You just started to increase your Outdoors Skills Set.

    Gary will send your processed pelt to whatever taxidermist you radvise, and bill that taxidermist for the work already accomplished.

    So now, at your taxidermist.... If your an unknown client, or if you have scared him with "late finances" before, he will process the job when you have paid 1/2 or 2/3 of the price.

    If you are a reliable paying client then he will finish your entire job with his next batch of bears. He will let you pay as you can. Tell that taxidermist you want to learn some, and then perhaps he will turn you loose on another bear or an early caribou. Don't worry, and go slow. He will be watching you so you don't cost him any future business. Note- it is not brain surgery.

    And before you know it, you just added skinning to your skill set. You just became a more complete hunter/outdoorsman, and isn't that really what we all want to become?

    ...or should I apoligize to you because you already know all that stuff, or already considered against my route?

    Dennis
    Alaska True Adventure Guide Service

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by northway View Post
    it for a long time (years), I would make sure everything is turned and fleshed and then salt it heavily and let it dry out. You can store it for years that way and not worry about it. Have had bear hides done like that and then tanned and they were perfect.

    Second what Northyway says. Properly fleshed and turned hides that are salted will out last all. Tanned hides have a shelf life, same with freezing. Never salt then freeze!

  14. #14
    Member Fuse's Avatar
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    Default NO!!!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by blackbear View Post
    For the first time I think I want to keep a hide rather than give it away of a spring black bear but due to some cost will have to wait a little while to get it to taxidermy. Should I salt it and then freeze it or just get it home in a freezer right away to prevent slippage

    What ever you do, don't salt and then try to freeze the hide. The salt will work on the hide just like on the sidewalk in winter to keep it from freezing, guaranteeing that it will rot. Either salt it, turn the ears and lips and dry it really well or flesh it and freeze it (I would recommend the latter). Talk to your taxidermist and he can give you great advice. Some of them up here in Fairbanks will flesh and freeze it themselves until they can get around to doing the work.

    Fuse

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